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Speech-in-noise

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420270/stages-of-change-in-audiology-comparison-of-three-self-assessment-measures
#1
Elisabeth Ingo, K Jonas Brännström, Gerhard Andersson, Thomas Lunner, Ariane Laplante-Lévesque
OBJECTIVE: In a clinical setting, theories of health behaviour change could help audiologists and other hearing health care professionals understand the barriers that prevent people with hearing problems to seek audiological help. The transtheoretical (stages of change) model of health behaviour change is one of these theories. It describes a person's journey towards health behaviour change (e.g. seeking help or taking up rehabilitation) in separate stages: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and, finally, maintenance...
April 19, 2017: International Journal of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418327/auditory-and-cognitive-factors-associated-with-speech-in-noise-complaints-following-mild-traumatic-brain-injury
#2
Eric C Hoover, Pamela E Souza, Frederick J Gallun
BACKGROUND: Auditory complaints following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) are common, but few studies have addressed the role of auditory temporal processing in speech recognition complaints. PURPOSE: In this study, deficits understanding speech in a background of speech noise following MTBI were evaluated with the goal of comparing the relative contributions of auditory and nonauditory factors. RESEARCH DESIGN: A matched-groups design was used in which a group of listeners with a history of MTBI were compared to a group matched in age and pure-tone thresholds, as well as a control group of young listeners with normal hearing (YNH)...
April 2017: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406683/evaluating-the-sources-and-functions-of-gradiency-in-phoneme-categorization-an-individual-differences-approach
#3
Efthymia C Kapnoula, Matthew B Winn, Eun Jong Kong, Jan Edwards, Bob McMurray
During spoken language comprehension listeners transform continuous acoustic cues into categories (e.g., /b/ and /p/). While long-standing research suggests that phonetic categories are activated in a gradient way, there are also clear individual differences in that more gradient categorization has been linked to various communication impairments such as dyslexia and specific language impairments (Joanisse, Manis, Keating, & Seidenberg, 2000; López-Zamora, Luque, Álvarez, & Cobos, 2012; Serniclaes, Van Heghe, Mousty, Carré, & Sprenger-Charolles, 2004; Werker & Tees, 1987)...
April 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28395561/acoustic-and-perceptual-effects-of-magnifying-interaural-difference-cues-in-a-simulated-binaural-hearing-aid
#4
Tobias de Taillez, Giso Grimm, Birger Kollmeier, Tobias Neher
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of an algorithm designed to enhance or magnify interaural difference cues on speech signals in noisy, spatially complex conditions using both technical and perceptual measurements. To also investigate the combination of interaural magnification (IM), monaural microphone directionality (DIR), and binaural coherence-based noise reduction (BC). DESIGN: Speech-in-noise stimuli were generated using virtual acoustics. A computational model of binaural hearing was used to analyse the spatial effects of IM...
April 10, 2017: International Journal of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390599/medial-olivocochlear-function-in-children-with-poor-speech-in-noise-performance-and-language-disorder
#5
Caroline Nunes Rocha-Muniz, Renata Mota Mamede Carvallo, Eliane Schochat
OBJECTIVES: Contralateral masking of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions is a phenomenon that suggests an inhibitory effect of the olivocochlear efferent auditory pathway. Many studies have been inconclusive in demonstrating a clear connection between this system and a behavioral speech-in-noise listening skill. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activation of a medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent in children with poor speech-in-noise (PSIN) performance and children with language impairment and PSIN (SLI + PSIN)...
May 2017: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389484/long-term-use-benefits-of-personal-frequency-modulated-systems-for-speech-in-noise-perception-in-patients-with-stroke-with-auditory-processing-deficits-a-non-randomised-controlled-trial-study
#6
Nehzat Koohi, Deborah Vickers, Jason Warren, David Werring, Doris-Eva Bamiou
OBJECTIVES: Approximately one in five stroke survivors suffer from difficulties with speech reception in noise, despite normal audiometry. These deficits are treatable with personal frequency-modulated systems (FMs). This study aimed to evaluate long-term benefits in speech reception in noise, after daily 10-week use of personal FMs, in non-aphasic patients with stroke with auditory processing deficits. DESIGN: This was a prospective non-randomised controlled trial study...
April 7, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372135/spatial-release-from-masking-based-on-binaural-processing-for-up-to-six-maskers
#7
William A Yost
Spatial Release from Masking (SRM) was measured for identification of a female target word spoken in the presence of male masker words. Target words from a single loudspeaker located at midline were presented when two, four, or six masker words were presented either from the same source as the target or from spatially separated masker sources. All masker words were presented from loudspeakers located symmetrically around the centered target source in the front azimuth hemifield. Three masking conditions were employed: speech-in-speech masking (involving both informational and energetic masking), speech-in-noise masking (involving energetic masking), and filtered speech-in-filtered speech masking (involving informational masking)...
March 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28367129/different-measures-of-auditory-and-visual-stroop-interference-and-their-relationship-to-speech-intelligibility-in-noise
#8
Sarah Knight, Antje Heinrich
Inhibition-the ability to suppress goal-irrelevant information-is thought to be an important cognitive skill in many situations, including speech-in-noise (SiN) perception. One way to measure inhibition is by means of Stroop tasks, in which one stimulus dimension must be named while a second, more prepotent dimension is ignored. The to-be-ignored dimension may be relevant or irrelevant to the target dimension, and the inhibition measure-Stroop interference (SI)-is calculated as the reaction time difference between the relevant and irrelevant conditions...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349534/hearing-loss-and-speech-perception-in-noise-difficulties-in-fanconi-anemia
#9
Emmy Verheij, Karin P Q Oomen, Stephanie E Smetsers, Gijsbert A van Zanten, Lucienne Speleman
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Fanconi anemia is a hereditary chromosomal instability disorder. Hearing loss and ear abnormalities are among the many manifestations reported in this disorder. In addition, Fanconi anemia patients often complain about hearing difficulties in situations with background noise (speech perception in noise difficulties). Our study aimed to describe the prevalence of hearing loss and speech perception in noise difficulties in Dutch Fanconi anemia patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review...
March 27, 2017: Laryngoscope
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346653/how-successful-is-the-fitting-of-digital-hearing-aids-implications-for-the-allocation-of-resources-within-national-health-systems
#10
Petros V Vlastarakos, Alastair I Cameron, Thomas P Nikolopoulos
We conducted a retrospective study to determine the success rate of initial fittings in digital hearing aid (DHA) users. We also addressed the implications of national health systems' continuing to provide access to these devices. We identified 1,597 consecutively presenting adults who had undergone a first fitting or a new fitting (i.e., an upgrade from an analogue hearing aid in the first or second ear) of a behind-the-ear DHA during the previous year. We further sought to identify all nominal reprogram appointments that had taken place within 6 months after the first or new fitting; we found 460 such appointments (28...
March 2017: Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334187/individual-differences-in-human-auditory-processing-insights-from-single-trial-auditory-midbrain-activity-in-an-animal-model
#11
Travis White-Schwoch, Trent Nicol, Catherine M Warrier, Daniel A Abrams, Nina Kraus
Auditory-evoked potentials are classically defined as the summations of synchronous firing along the auditory neuraxis. Converging evidence supports a model whereby timing jitter in neural coding compromises listening and causes variable scalp-recorded potentials. Yet the intrinsic noise of human scalp recordings precludes a full understanding of the biological origins of individual differences in listening skills. To delineate the mechanisms contributing to these phenomena, in vivo extracellular activity was recorded from inferior colliculus in guinea pigs to speech in quiet and noise...
October 5, 2016: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286635/maturational-changes-in-ear-advantage-for-monaural-word-recognition-in-noise-among-listeners-with-central-auditory-processing-disorders
#12
Mohsin Ahmed Shaikh, Lisa Fox-Thomas, Denise Tucker
This study aimed to investigate differences between ears in performance on a monaural word recognition in noise test among individuals across a broad range of ages assessed for (C)APD. Word recognition scores in quiet and in speech noise were collected retrospectively from the medical files of 107 individuals between the ages of 7 and 30 years who were diagnosed with (C)APD. No ear advantage was found on the word recognition in noise task in groups less than ten years. Performance in both ears was equally poor...
February 1, 2017: Audiology Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286478/cortical-alpha-oscillations-predict-speech-intelligibility
#13
Andrew Dimitrijevic, Michael L Smith, Darren S Kadis, David R Moore
Understanding speech in noise (SiN) is a complex task involving sensory encoding and cognitive resources including working memory and attention. Previous work has shown that brain oscillations, particularly alpha rhythms (8-12 Hz) play important roles in sensory processes involving working memory and attention. However, no previous study has examined brain oscillations during performance of a continuous speech perception test. The aim of this study was to measure cortical alpha during attentive listening in a commonly used SiN task (digits-in-noise, DiN) to better understand the neural processes associated with "top-down" cognitive processing in adverse listening environments...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28270784/auditory-and-non-auditory-contributions-for-unaided-speech-recognition-in-noise-as-a-function-of-hearing-aid-use
#14
Anja Gieseler, Maike A S Tahden, Christiane M Thiel, Kirsten C Wagener, Markus Meis, Hans Colonius
Differences in understanding speech in noise among hearing-impaired individuals cannot be explained entirely by hearing thresholds alone, suggesting the contribution of other factors beyond standard auditory ones as derived from the audiogram. This paper reports two analyses addressing individual differences in the explanation of unaided speech-in-noise performance among n = 438 elderly hearing-impaired listeners (mean = 71.1 ± 5.8 years). The main analysis was designed to identify clinically relevant auditory and non-auditory measures for speech-in-noise prediction using auditory (audiogram, categorical loudness scaling) and cognitive tests (verbal-intelligence test, screening test of dementia), as well as questionnaires assessing various self-reported measures (health status, socio-economic status, and subjective hearing problems)...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28268288/difficulty-understanding-speech-in-noise-by-the-hearing-impaired-underlying-causes-and-technological-solutions
#15
Eric W Healy, Sarah E Yoho
A primary complaint of hearing-impaired individuals involves poor speech understanding when background noise is present. Hearing aids and cochlear implants often allow good speech understanding in quiet backgrounds. But hearing-impaired individuals are highly noise intolerant, and existing devices are not very effective at combating background noise. As a result, speech understanding in noise is often quite poor. In accord with the significance of the problem, considerable effort has been expended toward understanding and remedying this issue...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264422/application-of-linear-mixed-effects-models-in-human-neuroscience-research-a-comparison-with-pearson-correlation-in-two-auditory-electrophysiology-studies
#16
Tess K Koerner, Yang Zhang
Neurophysiological studies are often designed to examine relationships between measures from different testing conditions, time points, or analysis techniques within the same group of participants. Appropriate statistical techniques that can take into account repeated measures and multivariate predictor variables are integral and essential to successful data analysis and interpretation. This work implements and compares conventional Pearson correlations and linear mixed-effects (LME) regression models using data from two recently published auditory electrophysiology studies...
February 27, 2017: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256107/peripheral-and-central-contribution-to-the-difficulty-of-speech-in-noise-perception-in-dyslexic-children
#17
Axelle Calcus, Paul Deltenre, Cécile Colin, Régine Kolinsky
Noise typically induces both peripheral and central masking of an auditory target. Whereas the idea that a deficit of speech in noise perception is inherent to dyslexia is still debated, most studies have actually focused on the peripheral contribution to the dyslexics' difficulties of perceiving speech in noise. Here, we investigated the respective contribution of both peripheral and central noise in three groups of children: dyslexic, chronological age matched controls (CA), and reading-level matched controls (RL)...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28253695/characterizing-the-binaural-contribution-to-speech-in-noise-reception-in-elderly-hearing-impaired-listeners
#18
Tobias Neher
To scrutinize the binaural contribution to speech-in-noise reception, four groups of elderly participants with or without audiometric asymmetry <2 kHz and with or without near-normal binaural intelligibility level difference (BILD) completed tests of monaural and binaural phase sensitivity as well as cognitive function. Groups did not differ in age, overall degree of hearing loss, or cognitive function. Analyses revealed an influence of BILD status but not audiometric asymmetry on monaural phase sensitivity, strong correlations between monaural and binaural detection thresholds, and monaural and binaural but not cognitive BILD contributions...
February 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28253672/contribution-of-formant-frequency-information-to-vowel-perception-in-steady-state-noise-by-cochlear-implant-users
#19
Elad Sagi, Mario A Svirsky
Cochlear implant (CI) recipients have difficulty understanding speech in noise even at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. Knowing the mechanisms they use to understand speech in noise may facilitate the search for better speech processing algorithms. In the present study, a computational model is used to assess whether CI users' vowel identification in noise can be explained by formant frequency cues (F1 and F2). Vowel identification was tested with 12 unilateral CI users in quiet and in noise. Formant cues were measured from vowels in each condition, specific to each subject's speech processor...
February 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226445/difficulty-understanding-speech-in-noise-by-the-hearing-impaired-underlying-causes-and-technological-solutions
#20
Eric W Healy, Sarah E Yoho, Eric W Healy, Sarah E Yoho, Sarah E Yoho, Eric W Healy
A primary complaint of hearing-impaired individuals involves poor speech understanding when background noise is present. Hearing aids and cochlear implants often allow good speech understanding in quiet backgrounds. But hearing-impaired individuals are highly noise intolerant, and existing devices are not very effective at combating background noise. As a result, speech understanding in noise is often quite poor. In accord with the significance of the problem, considerable effort has been expended toward understanding and remedying this issue...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
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