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Julien Muffat, Yun Li, Rudolf Jaenisch
In vitro differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells provides a systematic platform to investigate the physiological development and function of the human nervous system, as well as the etiology and consequence when these processes go awry. Recent development in three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture systems allows modeling of the complex structure formation of the human CNS, and the intricate interactions between various resident neuronal and glial cell types. Combined with an ever-expanding genome editing and regulation toolkit such as CRISPR/Cas9, it is now a possibility to study human neurological disease in the relevant molecular, cellular and anatomical context...
October 18, 2016: Current Opinion in Cell Biology
Nina Xie, He Gong, Joshua A Suhl, Pankaj Chopra, Tao Wang, Stephen T Warren
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of intellectual disability that is most often due to a CGG-repeat expansion mutation in the FMR1 gene that triggers epigenetic gene silencing. Epigenetic modifying drugs can only transiently and modestly induce FMR1 reactivation in the presence of the elongated CGG repeat. As a proof-of-principle, we excised the expanded CGG-repeat in both somatic cell hybrids containing the human fragile X chromosome and human FXS iPS cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. We observed transcriptional reactivation in approximately 67% of the CRISPR cut hybrid colonies and in 20% of isolated human FXS iPSC colonies...
2016: PloS One
Glenn Yiu, Eric Tieu, Anthony T Nguyen, Brittany Wong, Zeljka Smit-McBride
Purpose: To employ type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonuclease to suppress ocular angiogenesis by genomic disruption of VEGF-A in human RPE cells. Methods: CRISPR sequences targeting exon 1 of human VEGF-A were computationally identified based on predicted Cas9 on- and off-target probabilities. Single guide RNA (gRNA) cassettes with these target sequences were cloned into lentiviral vectors encoding the Streptococcuspyogenes Cas9 endonuclease (SpCas9) gene...
October 1, 2016: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Tetsuya Ishii
Genome editing based on site-directed nucleases facilitated efficient and versatile genetic modifications in human cells. However, recent reports, demonstrating CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in human embryos have raised profound concerns worldwide. This commentary explores the clinical justification and feasibility of reproductive medicine using germline genome editing. Despite the perceived utility of reproductive medicine for treating intractable infertility, it is difficult to justify germline genome editing from the perspective of the prospective child...
October 5, 2016: Reproductive Biomedicine Online
Shenzhao Lu, Jiawei Zhou
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, but its cause and pathogenesis are still not fully understood. Earlier studies have shown that SNCA, which encodes α-synuclein, is one of the key genes associated with PD. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants of SNCA are thought to be correlated with disease onset. The underlying mechanisms however are enigmatic. A recent study published in Nature revealed that one of the SNP variants in the SNCA non-coding element elevated α-synuclein expression in human neurons by reducing the binding efficiency of transcription factors, demonstrating a previously uncharted role for SNPs in the pathogenesis of PD...
October 14, 2016: Neuroscience Bulletin
Xiaotang Hu
Since 2012, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been quickly and successfully tested in a broad range of organisms and cells including hematopoietic cells. The application of CRISPR-Cas9 in human hematopoietic cells mainly involves the genes responsible for HIV infection, β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD). The successful disruption of CCR5 and CXCR4 genes in T cells by CRISPR-Cas9 promotes the prospect of the technology in the functional cure of HIV. More recently, eliminating CCR5 and CXCR4 in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients and targeting the HIV genome have been successfully carried out in several laboratories...
October 2, 2016: Blood Cells, Molecules & Diseases
Hong-Hao Yu, Heng Zhao, Yu-Bo Qing, Wei-Rong Pan, Bao-Yu Jia, Hong-Ye Zhao, Xing-Xu Huang, Hong-Jiang Wei
Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease...
October 9, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Chance M Nowak, Seth Lawson, Megan Zerez, Leonidas Bleris
The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats system allows a single guide RNA (sgRNA) to direct a protein with combined helicase and nuclease activity to the DNA. Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), a CRISPR-associated protein, has revolutionized our ability to probe and edit the human genome in vitro and in vivo Arguably, the true modularity of the Cas9 platform is conferred through the ease of sgRNA programmability as well as the degree of modifications the sgRNA can tolerate without compromising its association with SpCas9 and function...
October 12, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
Xie Dejian, Shi Minglei, Zhang Yan, Wang Tianyi, Shen Wenlong, Ye Bingyu, Li Ping, He Chao, Zhang Xiangyuan, Zhao Zhihu
The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is the main insulator protein described in vertebrates. It plays fundamental roles during diverse cellular processes. CTCF gene knockout mice led to death during embryonic development. To further explore the functions of CTCF, we employed a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering strategy to in-frame insert the mitosis-special degradation domain (MD) of cyclin B into the upstream open reading frame of CTCF gene. Fusion protein is designed to degrade during mitosis leaded by MD. As a control group, mutation of a single arginine (R42A) within the destruction box inactivates the MD leading to constitutive expression of MD(*)-CTCF...
July 20, 2016: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
Yang Yang, Jian-Ge Qiu, Yong Li, Jin-Ming Di, Wen-Ji Zhang, Qi-Wei Jiang, Di-Wei Zheng, Yao Chen, Meng-Ning Wei, Jia-Rong Huang, Kun Wang, Zhi Shi
The RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic (CRISPR) in combination with a CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) nuclease system is a new rapid and precise technology for genome editing. In the present study, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target ABCB1 (also named MDR1) gene which encodes a 170 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein/P-gp) transporting multiple types of chemotherapeutic drugs including taxanes, epipodophyllotoxins, vinca alkaloids and anthracyclines out of cells to contribute multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells...
2016: American Journal of Translational Research
Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir, Haihong Hao, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Hafiz Iftikhar Hussain, Zahid Iqbal, Saeed Ahmed, Adeel Sattar, Mujahid Iqbal, Jun Li, Zonghui Yuan
Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). CRISPR-associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Hanchao Gao, Chengjiang Zhao, Xi Xiang, Yong Li, Yanli Zhao, Zesong Li, Dengke Pan, Yifan Dai, Hidetaka Hara, David K C Cooper, Zhiming Cai, Lisha Mou
Gene-knockout pigs hold great promise as a solution to the shortage of organs from donor animals for xenotransplantation. Several groups have generated gene-knockout pigs via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Herein, we adopted a simple and micromanipulator-free method, handmade cloning (HMC) instead of SCNT, to generate double gene-knockout pigs. First, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) and cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) genes simultaneously in porcine fetal fibroblast cells (PFFs), which were derived from wild-type Chinese domestic miniature Wuzhishan pigs...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Reproduction and Development
Daria R Bulanova, Yevhen A Akimov, Anne Rokka, Teemu D Laajala, Tero Aittokallio, Petri Kouvonen, Teijo Pellinen, Sergey G Kuznetsov
G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR), Class C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) has been implicated in several malignancies. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Using a panel of human cell lines, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout and RNAi-mediated depletion of GPRC5A impairs cell adhesion to integrin substrates: collagens I and IV, fibronectin, as well as to extracellular matrix proteins derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) mouse sarcoma (Matrigel). Consistent with the phenotype, knock-out of GPRC5A correlated with a reduced integrin β1 (ITGB1) protein expression, impaired phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and lower activity of small GTPases RhoA and Rac1...
October 7, 2016: Cell Adhesion & Migration
Chaolong Lin, Huanhuan Li, Mengru Hao, Dan Xiong, Yong Luo, Chenghao Huang, Quan Yuan, Jun Zhang, Ningshao Xia
Genetically modified HSV-1 viruses serve as promising vectors for tumour therapy and vaccine development. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is one of the most powerful tools for precise gene editing of the genomes of organisms. However, whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely and efficiently make gene replacements in the genome of HSV-1 remains essentially unknown. Here, we reported CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the HSV-1 genome in human cells, including the knockout and replacement of large genes. In established cells stably expressing CRISPR/Cas9, gRNA in coordination with Cas9 could direct a precise cleavage within a pre-defined target region, and foreign genes were successfully used to replace the target gene seamlessly by HDR-mediated gene replacement...
October 7, 2016: Scientific Reports
Chul-Yong Park, Jin Jea Sung, Sang-Hwi Choi, Dongjin R Lee, In-Hyun Park, Dong-Wook Kim
Genome engineering technology using engineered nucleases has been rapidly developing, enabling the efficient correction of simple mutations. However, the precise correction of structural variations (SVs) such as large inversions remains limited. Here we describe a detailed procedure for the modeling or correction of large chromosomal rearrangements and short nucleotide repeat expansions using engineered nucleases in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from a healthy donor and patients with SVs. This protocol includes the delivery of engineered nucleases with no donor template to hiPSCs, and genotyping and derivation/characterization of gene-manipulated hiPSC clones...
November 2016: Nature Protocols
Zhenyu He, Kehkooi Kee
Gene targeting and editing is an essential tool for both basic research and clinical application such as gene therapy. Several endonucleases have been invented to fulfill these purposes, including zinc finger nucleases, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9. Although all of these systems can target DNA sequence with high efficiency, they also exert off-target effects and genotoxicity. The off-target effects might not hinder their usage in animal models because the correctly targeted cells can be selected for further studies...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Chew-Li Soh, Danwei Huangfu
The recent advent of engineered nucleases including the CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly facilitated genome manipulation in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In addition to facilitating hPSC-based disease studies, the application of genome engineering in hPSCs has also opened up new avenues for cell replacement therapy. To improve consistency and reproducibility of hPSC-based studies, and to meet the safety and regulatory requirements for clinical translation, it is necessary to use a defined, xeno-free cell culture system...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Kit-San Yuen, Chi-Ping Chan, Kin-Hang Kok, Dong-Yan Jin
The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system is a powerful genome-editing tool for both chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA. DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergoes episomal replication in human cells, can be effectively edited by CRISPR/Cas9. We have demonstrated targeted editing of the EBV genome by CRISPR/Cas9 in several lines of EBV-infected cells. CRISPR/Cas9-based mutagenesis and genome engineering of EBV provides a new method for genetic analysis, which has some advantages over bacterial artificial chromosome-based recombineering...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Ciaran M Lee, Haibao Zhu, Timothy H Davis, Harshahardhan Deshmukh, Gang Bao
The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for precision genome editing. The ability to accurately modify genomic DNA in situ with single nucleotide precision opens up new possibilities for not only basic research but also biotechnology applications and clinical translation. In this chapter, we outline the procedures for design, screening, and validation of CRISPR/Cas9 systems for targeted modification of coding sequences in the human genome and how to perform genome editing in induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency and specificity...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Yang Ou, Shang-Jui Wang, Dawei Li, Bo Chu, Wei Gu
Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis remain critical barriers to cancer development, the emerging role of p53 in cell metabolism, oxidative responses, and ferroptotic cell death has been a topic of great interest. Nevertheless, it is unclear how p53 orchestrates its activities in multiple metabolic pathways into tumor suppressive effects. Here, we identified the SAT1 (spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1) gene as a transcription target of p53. SAT1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism critically involved in the conversion of spermidine and spermine back to putrescine...
October 3, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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