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"narrative medicine"

Joanne Jacobson
This piece returns to the writer's memoir essays about her mother's chronic lung disease to examine the relationship between the act of caregiving and the act of writing. In arguing for important differences between the clinical, healing imperatives of narrative medicine and the primacy for the writer of self-reflection, personal need and career, the essay demonstrates how writing remains in many ways at odds with the obligations and the hopes of caregiving. At the same time, the essay argues that writing her mother's stories of illness holds the potential for both honor and mutuality-and can, in fact, constitute a form of caregiving...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Medical Humanities
Abigail Ford Winkel, Nathalie Feldman, Haley Moss, Holli Jakalow, Julia Simon, Stephanie Blank
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a workshop Narrative Medicine curriculum can improve burnout among obstetrics and gynecology residents. METHODS: A Narrative Medicine curriculum was conducted at three obstetrics and gynecology training programs. An explanatory research design examined correlation between Narrative Medicine attendance and changes in survey responses. Residents completed a pretest and 1-year posttest survey that included validated measures of burnout and empathy...
October 2016: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jo Marie Reilly
This commentary reflects the professional life story of a prolific and well-published poet, Howard Stein. An anthropologist by training, Howard's poetry is well known and well respected by family physicians. It is within family medicine that Howard found his professional home, and in his 45-plus-year career he has shared the value of "patient story"; the value of the doctor-patient relationship; and the art of listening deeply to self, colleagues, and patients. This commentary offers a tribute to Howard's professional life and his contributions to family and narrative medicine...
September 2016: Families, Systems & Health: the Journal of Collaborative Family Healthcare
John W Murphy, Berkeley A Franz
The move to patient-centered medical practice is important for providing relevant and sustainable health care. Narrative medicine, for example, suggests that patients should be involved significantly in diagnosis and treatment. In order to understand the meaning of symptoms and interventions, therefore, physicians must enter the life worlds of patients. But physicians face high patient loads and limited time for extended consultations. In current medical practice, then, is narrative medicine possible? We argue that engaging patient perspectives in the medical visit does not necessarily require a lengthy interview...
August 30, 2016: Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy
Ahmad Kalateh Sadati, Mohammad Taghi Iman, Kamran Bagheri Lankarani, Soghra Derakhshan
Doctor-patient interaction is a subject with ethical ramifications, besides being an important issue in medical sociology. The main goal of this critical study is to explore the interactional experience of hospital admitted patients. For this reason, the study, carried out in an educational hospital in southern Iran, entailed 156 recorded clinical consultations, 920 hours of participant observation, and six focus groups consisting of patients and their families. The research method used is Critical Ethnography, which was introduced by PF Carspecken...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Chiara Fioretti, Ketti Mazzocco, Silvia Riva, Serena Oliveri, Marianna Masiero, Gabriella Pravettoni
OBJECTIVE: Since its birth about 30 years ago, Narrative Medicine approach has increased in popularity in the medical context as well as in other disciplines. This paper aims to review Narrative Medicine research studies on patients' and their caregivers' illness experience. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: MEDLINE, Psycinfo, EBSCO Psychological and Behavioural Science, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases were searched to identify all the research studies which focused on the Narrative Medicine approach reported in the title, in the abstract and in the keywords the words 'Narrative Medicine' or 'Narrative-based Medicine'...
2016: BMJ Open
Giorgina Barbara Piccoli, Irene Capizzi, Federica Neve Vigotti, Filomena Leone, Claudia D'Alessandro, Domenica Giuffrida, Marta Nazha, Simona Roggero, Nicoletta Colombi, Giuseppe Mauro, Natascia Castelluccia, Adamasco Cupisti, Paolo Avagnina
Dietary therapy represents an important tool in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD), mainly through a balanced reduction of protein intake aimed at giving the remnant nephrons in damaged kidneys a "functional rest". While dialysis, transplantation, and pharmacological therapies are usually seen as "high tech" medicine, non pharmacological interventions, including diets, are frequently considered lifestyle-complementary treatments. Diet is one of the oldest CKD treatments, and it is usually considered a part of "mainstream" management...
2016: BMC Nephrology
Jonathan Davidson, Wayne Jonas
OBJECTIVES: The benefit and potential mechanisms of action of homeopathy have long been debated. Almost entirely neglected has been the study of individualized homeopathy (IH) as a form of psychotherapy, which incorporates factors that are common to most therapies while using processes that are specific to IH. METHODS: Recent research into the therapeutic components of IH is reviewed; similarities and differences between IH and other forms of psychotherapy are also described...
August 2016: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Antonietta Cappuccio, Tommaso Limonta, Aurora Parodi, Antonio Cristaudo, Filomena Bugliaro, Serafinella P Cannavò, Oliviero Rossi, Carlotta Gurioli, Alice Vignoli, Roberta Parente, Enrico Iemoli, Giacomo Caldarola, Ornella De Pità, Sergio Di Nuzzo, Mauro Cancian, Concetta Potenza, Marco Caminati, Luca Stingeni, Rita Saraceno, Sara Trevisini, Angelo Piccirillo, Claudio Sciarrone, Rosanna Panebianco, Massimo Gola, Antonio Costanzo, Teresa Grieco, Katia Massaroni, Luigi Reale, Maria G Marini
Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is perceived as a difficult to manage disease with negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to highlight how to improve the care of people with CSU, using the methodology of narrative medicine. From June 2014 to March 2015, CSU-diagnosed patients and their physicians were asked to record their experiences of the condition in writing. Fourteen healthcare teams participated: 41% considered CSU as a challenge to overcome, while 22% experienced CSU as a big commitment...
June 8, 2016: Acta Dermato-venereologica
Massimo Breccia, Guendalina Graffigna, Sara Galimberti, Alessandra Iurlo, Ester Pungolino, Michele Pizzuti, Alessandro Maggi, Franca Falzetti, Silvana Franca Capalbo, Tamara Intermesoli, Margherita Maffioli, Chiara Elena, Alessandro Melosi, Federico Simonetti, Enrico Capochiani, Roberta Della Seta, Matteo Pacilli, Mario Luppi, Nicola Di Renzo, Lucia Mastrullo, Elena Trabacchi, Daniele Vallisa, Davide Rapezzi, Ester Maria Orlandi, Carlo Gambacorti-Passerini, Fabio Efficace, Giuliana Alimena
BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) drastically changed the outcome of patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Several reports indicated the advantage of continue long-term adherence associated with positive outcome. Therefore, it is important to better understand from the patient's standpoint the experience of living with the disease and the related treatment. OBJECTIVES: In this study, quantitative analysis and narrative medicine were combined to get insights on this issue in a population of 257 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with TKIs (43 % men, with a median age of 58 years, 27 % aged 31-50 years), followed for a median time of 5 years...
November 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
C Cenci
Healthcare organisations, medical knowledge and clinical practice are among the contexts that have most strongly felt the impact of the over 75 population. This is a population of multimorbidity and polypharmacy patients. They are often seen as a conglomeration of juxtaposed guidelines resulting in the intake of more than 10 drugs a day, with absolutely no certainty of their efficacy. The scientific community is increasingly calling into question the current disease-focused approach. Narrative medicine can provide the tools for a treatment plan which is instead more patient-centred...
July 2016: European Journal of Internal Medicine
Ivana Truccolo
In this article, guest writer Ivana Truccolo presents an overview of her work at the Scientific and Patient Library of a Cancer Comprehensive Centre in Italy coordinating the patient education process. She discusses the historical evolution of the concept of patient education and how this has run alongside the role of the health librarian in the provision of consumer health information. Details are provided about various patient education programmes in place at the Centre. In particular, various activities are discussed including patient education classes, the development of patient education handouts and a narrative medicine programme which includes a literary competition...
June 2016: Health Information and Libraries Journal
Tzipi Weiss, Marci J Swede
ISSUE: The Institute of Medicine identified health care education reform as a key to improving the error prone, costly, and unsatisfying U.S. health care system. It called for health care education that no longer focuses exclusively on the mastery of technical skills but teaches students the human dimensions of care and develops their ability to collaborate with patients and colleagues to alleviate suffering and improve health. When should this educational reform begin, by what frameworks should it be guided, and which methods should it employ are important questions to explore...
May 4, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Dorene Balmer, Anne Gill, Ricardo Nuila
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medical Education
Abigail Ford Winkel, Holli Jakalow, Laura Benton, Haley Moss, Lauren Mitchell, Nathalie Feldman
BACKGROUND: The authors sought to evaluate burnout and empathy among obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) residents, and to explore contributing factors through the analysis of writings from a Narrative Medicine (NM) didactic programme. METHODS: Twenty-four OBGYN residents (out of a possible 29 residents, 83%) participated in an NM workshop series consisting of eight 1-hour reflective writing sessions from 2013 to 2014. They completed pre- and post-workshop surveys composed of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and questions covering demographic information...
April 5, 2016: Clinical Teacher
Bradley Lewis
Mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) are rapidly emerging in health care settings for their role in reducing stress and improving physical and mental health. In such settings, the religious roots and affiliations of MBIs are downplayed, and the possibilities for developing spiritual, even mystical, states of consciousness are minimized. This article helps rebalance this trend by using the tools of medical humanities and narrative medicine to explore MBI as a bridge between medical and spiritual approaches to health related suffering...
March 10, 2016: Journal of Medical Humanities
John W Murphy, Jung Min Choi, Martin Cadeiras
This article is designed to unite theory and practice. The focus of attention is the impact of narrative medicine on clinical records. Specifically important is that records are created through dialogue, whereby patients are able to grow the record through their ability to offer critiques and alternative explanations. Merely allowing patients to peruse their records, through advances in technology, is not sufficient to facilitate this aim. Various theoretical and practical considerations are discussed that may facilitate patient involvement and the creation of more accurate and relevant patient records...
2016: Permanente Journal
Gian Luca Barbieri, Sara Bennati, Stefano Capretto, Barbara Ghinelli, Corrado Vecchi
This article presents a qualitative study realized in the Children's University Hospital of Parma, Italy, aimed at observing the effects of the fictional narrative in the emotions of the young patients. The results showed that, especially by means of projection, identification and symbolization, the imagination helps the children to elaborate in a positive way the bad emotions elicited by the experience of the disease and of the stay in hospital. Furthermore, the study was useful to the healthcare professionals in order to understand the emotive, cognitive and relational needs of the patients...
February 1, 2016: Journal of Child Health Care: for Professionals Working with Children in the Hospital and Community
Mark J Kissler, Ben Saxton, Ricardo Nuila, Dorene F Balmer
As an early and important experience in medical education, dissection in the gross anatomy lab is a locus of professional formation. Because students often think of their professional development in evolving, narrative terms, the authors propose that close attention to these narratives might add to understanding of professional formation in progress. They solicited written reflections from students, to explore ways that both the content and form of written reflections might illuminate themes relevant to professional formation, and to describe some elements of professional formation in the context of one institution (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas)...
June 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Gianpaolo Donzelli, Kathleen S McGreevy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 22, 2016: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
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