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Hippocampal volume

M Pruessner, L Bechard-Evans, S Pira, R Joober, D L Collins, J C Pruessner, A K Malla
BACKGROUND: Altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and reduced hippocampal volume (HV) are established correlates of stress vulnerability. We have previously shown an attenuated cortisol awakening response (CAR) and associations with HV specifically in male first-episode psychosis patients. Findings in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis regarding these neurobiological markers are inconsistent, and assessment of their interplay, accounting for sex differences, could explain incongruent results...
October 24, 2016: Psychological Medicine
Anna Walter, Claudia Suenderhauf, Harrisberger Fabienne, Claudia Lenz, Renata Smieskova, Yoonho Chung, Tyrone D Cannon, Carrie E Bearden, Charlotte Rapp, Kerstin Bendfeldt, Stefan Borgwardt, Tobias Vogel
Several magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported reductions in hippocampal volume in patients with psychosis. It is unclear whether structural abnormalities predate illness onset. We conducted a detailed, systematic literature search for studies reporting hippocampal volume in subjects with clinical high-risk, compared to healthy controls. The overall sample size comprised 1429 subjects. Meta-analysis revealed no difference for left, but a small, albeit significant, difference for right hippocampal volume, such that clinical high-risk patients had slightly smaller hippocampal volume than healthy controls (g=0...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Eva F G Naninck, J Efraim Oosterink, Kit-Yi Yam, Lennart P de Vries, Henk Schierbeek, Johannes B van Goudoever, Rikst-Nynke Verkaik-Schakel, Josèe A Plantinga, Torsten Plosch, Paul J Lucassen, Aniko Korosi
Early-life stress (ES) impairs cognition later in life. Because ES prevention is problematic, intervention is needed, yet the mechanisms that underlie ES remain largely unknown. So far, the role of early nutrition in brain programming has been largely ignored. Here, we demonstrate that essential 1-carbon metabolism-associated micronutrients (1-CMAMs; i.e., methionine and B vitamins) early in life are crucial in programming later cognition by ES. ES was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice from postnatal d (P)2-9. 1-CMAM levels were measured centrally and peripherally by using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy...
October 21, 2016: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Eunjoo Kim, Amy Garrett, Spencer Boucher, Min-Hyeon Park, Meghan Howe, Erica Sanders, Ryan G Kelley, Allan L Reiss, Kiki D Chang, Manpreet K Singh
BACKGROUND: Prior studies have suggested that inhibited temperament may be associated with an increased risk for developing anxiety or mood disorder, including bipolar disorder. However, the neurobiological basis for this increased risk is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine temperament in symptomatic and asymptomatic child offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (OBD) and to investigate whether inhibited temperament is associated with aberrant hippocampal volumes compared with healthy control (HC) youth...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Dennis Chan, Laura Marie Gallaher, Kuven Moodley, Ludovico Minati, Neil Burgess, Tom Hartley
This protocol describes the administration of the 4 Mountains Test (4MT), a short test of spatial memory, in which memory for the topographical layout of four mountains within a computer-generated landscape is tested using a delayed match-to-sample paradigm. Allocentric spatial memory is assessed by altering the viewpoint, colors and textures between the initially presented and target images. Allocentric spatial memory is a key function of the hippocampus, one of the earliest brain regions to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and impairment of hippocampal function predates the onset of dementia...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Julia Vakhrusheva, Brielle Marino, T Scott Stroup, David Kimhy
Schizophrenia is characterized by extensive neurocognitive deficits, which are linked to greater disability, poorer functional outcome, and have been suggested to impact daily functioning more than clinical symptoms. Aerobic exercise (AE) has emerged as a potential intervention. This review examines the impact of AE on brain structure and function along with neurocognitive performance in individuals with schizophrenia. Preliminary evidence indicates that AE can increase hippocampal volume and cortical thickness, in addition to exerting a neuroprotective effect against hippocampal volume decrease and cortical thinning...
June 2016: Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
Robert S C Amaral, Min Tae M Park, Gabriel A Devenyi, Vivian Lynn, Jon Pipitone, Julie Winterburn, Sofia Chavez, Mark Schira, Nancy Lobaugh, Aristotle N Voineskos, Jens C Pruessner, M Mallar Chakravarty
Recently, much attention has been focused on the definition and structure of the hippocampus and its subfields, while the projections from the hippocampus have been relatively understudied. Here, we derive a reliable protocol for manual segmentation of hippocampal white matter regions (alveus, fimbria, and fornix) using high-resolution magnetic resonance images that are complementary to our previous definitions of the hippocampal subfields, both of which are freely available at
October 17, 2016: NeuroImage
Eider M Arenaza-Urquijo, Robin de Flores, Julie Gonneaud, Miranka Wirth, Valentin Ourry, William Callewaert, Brigitte Landeau, Stéphanie Egret, Florence Mézenge, Béatrice Desgranges, Gaël Chételat
Engagement in cognitive activity (CA) and physical activity (PA) during the lifespan may counteract brain atrophy later in life. Here, we investigated engagement in CA and PA during late adulthood in association with gray matter volume (GM) in normal older adults, with special focus on the hippocampus. Forty-five cognitively normal older individuals (mean age: 72) underwent T1-weighted MRI and self-reported CA and PA assessment. Whole brain voxel-wise multiple regression models were carried out to assess the relationships between CA, PA and GM volume adjusted by age and sex...
October 18, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Mikkel Vestergaard Olesen, Gitta Wörtwein, Jonas Folke, Bente Pakkenberg
Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) is one of the strongest stimulators of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents that represents a plausible mechanism for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder. Using design-based stereological cell counting, we recently documented an initial 2.6-fold increase in neurogenesis following a clinical relevant schedule of ECS, a treatment also rescuing depression-like behavior in rats. However, these results gave no demonstration of the longevity of newly-generated neurons...
October 18, 2016: Hippocampus
Koki Takane, Yu Hasegawa, Lin Bowen, Takashi Yokoo, Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
OBJECTIVE: Increasing evidences suggest that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show not only cognitive impairment but also physical disorder including cardiac dysfunction and sarcopenia. In this study, we investigated whether central angiotensin II, inducer of oxidative stress, led to the organ dysfunction in a mouse model of AD. DESIGN AND METHOD: 5XFAD which is an animal model of AD and C57BL/6 (WT) were each assigned to 1) normal saline and 2) angiotensin II (20 mg/kg/h) groups...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Lijie Zhang, Lei Qiao, Qunlin Chen, Wenjing Yang, Mengsi Xu, Xiaonan Yao, Jiang Qiu, Dong Yang
Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Woo Hee Choi, Won Sang Jung, Yoo Hyun Um, Chang Uk Lee, Young Ha Park, Hyun Kook Lim
BACKGROUND: Although there is substantial evidence of associations between frontal-striatal circuits and cerebral vascular burden in late-onset depression (LOD), relationships between vascular burden and hippocampal subfields are not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between cerebral vascular burden and hippocampal subfield volume in LOD patients. METHODS: Fifty subjects with LOD and 50 group-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Rene Seiger, Andreas Hahn, Allan Hummer, Georg S Kranz, Sebastian Ganger, Michael Woletz, Christoph Kraus, Ronald Sladky, Alexander Kautzky, Siegfried Kasper, Christian Windischberger, Rupert Lanzenberger
Sex-steroid hormones are primarily involved in sexual differentiation and development and are thought to underlie processes related to cognition and emotion. However, divergent results have been reported concerning the effects of hormone administration on brain structure including side effects like brain atrophy and dementia. Cross-sex hormone therapy in transgender subjects offers a unique model for studying the effects of sex hormones on the living human brain. In this study, 25 Female-to-Male (FtM) and 14 Male-to-Female (MtF) subjects underwent MRI examinations at baseline and after a period of at least 4-months of continuous cross-sex hormone administration...
October 5, 2016: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Benjamin Johnstone, Dennis Velakoulis, Cheng Yi Yuan, Anthony Ang, Chris Steward, Patricia Desmond, Terence J O'Brien
OBJECTIVE: Exposure to early life childhood trauma has been implicated as resulting in a vulnerability to epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), hippocampal atrophy, and psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to explore the relationships between childhood trauma, epilepsy, PNES, and hippocampal volume in patients admitted to a video-electroencephalogram monitoring (VEM) unit. METHODS: One hundred thirty-one patients were recruited from the Royal Melbourne Hospital VEM unit...
October 12, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Ruth L F Leong, June C Lo, Sam K Y Sim, Hui Zheng, Jesisca Tandi, Juan Zhou, Michael W L Chee
Although East Asia harbors the largest number of aging adults in the world, there is currently little data clarifying the longitudinal brain-cognition relationships in this group. Here, we report structural MRI and neuropsychological findings from relatively healthy Chinese older adults of the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study cohort over 8 years of follow up (n = 111, mean age = 67.1 years, range = 56.1-83.1 years at baseline). Aging-related change in structural volume was observed, with total cerebral atrophy at -0...
October 11, 2016: NeuroImage
Fabienne Harrisberger, Roman Buechler, Renata Smieskova, Claudia Lenz, Anna Walter, Laura Egloff, Kerstin Bendfeldt, Andor E Simon, Diana Wotruba, Anastasia Theodoridou, Wulf Rössler, Anita Riecher-Rössler, Undine E Lang, Karsten Heekeren, Stefan Borgwardt
Reduction in hippocampal volume is a hallmark of schizophrenia and already present in the clinical high-risk state. Nevertheless, other subcortical structures, such as the thalamus, amygdala and pallidum can differentiate schizophrenia patients from controls. We studied the role of hippocampal and subcortical structures in clinical high-risk individuals from two cohorts. High-resolution T1-weighted structural MRI brain scans of a total of 91 clinical high-risk individuals and 64 healthy controls were collected in two centers...
2016: NPJ Schizophrenia
Stephen W Scheff, Kelly N Roberts
We have previously shown that pycnogenol (PYC) increases antioxidants, decreases oxidative stress, suppresses neuroinflammation and enhances synaptic plasticity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we investigate the effects of PYC on cognitive function following a controlled cortical impact (CCI). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received a CCI injury followed by an intraperitoneal injection of PYC (50 or 100mg/kg). Seven days post trauma, subjects were evaluated in a Morris water maze (MWM) and evaluated for changes in lesion volume...
October 11, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Markus Sack, Jenny N Lenz, Mira Jakovcevski, Sarah V Biedermann, Claudia Falfán-Melgoza, Jan Deussing, Maximilian Bielohuby, Martin Bidlingmaier, Frederik Pfister, Günter K Stalla, Alexander Sartorius, Peter Gass, Wolfgang Weber-Fahr, Johannes Fuss, Matthias K Auer
Excessive intake of high-caloric diets as well as subsequent development of obesity and diabetes mellitus may exert a wide range of unfavorable effects on the central nervous system (CNS) in the long-term. The potentially harmful effects of such diets were suggested to be mitigated by physical exercise. Here, we conducted a study investigating early effects of a cafeteria-diet on gray and white brain matter volume by means of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Half of the mice performed voluntary wheel running to study if regular physical exercise prevents unfavorable effects of a cafeteria-diet...
October 12, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Cali F Bartholomeusz, Vanessa L Cropley, Cassandra Wannan, Maria Di Biase, Patrick D McGorry, Christos Pantelis
OBJECTIVE: This review critically examines the structural neuroimaging evidence in psychotic illness, with a focus on longitudinal imaging across the first-episode psychosis and ultra-high-risk of psychosis illness stages. METHODS: A thorough search of the literature involving specifically longitudinal neuroimaging in early illness stages of psychosis was conducted. The evidence supporting abnormalities in brain morphology and altered neurodevelopmental trajectories is discussed in the context of a clinical staging model...
October 12, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
A Hasan, T Wobrock, B Guse, B Langguth, M Landgrebe, P Eichhammer, E Frank, J Cordes, W Wölwer, F Musso, G Winterer, W Gaebel, G Hajak, C Ohmann, P E Verde, M Rietschel, R Ahmed, W G Honer, P Dechent, B Malchow, M F U Castro, D Dwyer, C Cabral, P M Kreuzer, T B Poeppl, T Schneider-Axmann, P Falkai, N Koutsouleris
Impaired neural plasticity may be a core pathophysiological process underlying the symptomatology of schizophrenia. Plasticity-enhancing interventions, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), may improve difficult-to-treat symptoms; however, efficacy in large clinical trials appears limited. The high variability of rTMS-related treatment response may be related to a comparably large variation in the ability to generate plastic neural changes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether negative symptom improvement in schizophrenia patients receiving rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was related to rTMS-related brain volume changes...
October 11, 2016: Molecular Psychiatry
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