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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811655/a-tissue-engineered-blood-vessel-model-of-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome-using-human-ipsc-derived-smooth-muscle-cells
#1
Leigh Atchison, Haoyue Zhang, Kan Cao, George A Truskey
Hutchison-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, accelerated aging disorder caused by nuclear accumulation of progerin, an altered form of the Lamin A gene. The primary cause of death is cardiovascular disease at about 14 years. Loss and dysfunction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the vasculature may cause defects associated with HGPS. Due to limitations of 2D cell culture and mouse models, there is a need to develop improved models to discover novel therapeutics. To address this need, we produced a functional three-dimensional model of HGPS that replicates an arteriole-scale tissue engineered blood vessel (TEBV) using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived SMCs from an HGPS patient...
August 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712764/nucleocytoplasmic-transport-in-cells-with-progerin-induced-defective-nuclear-lamina
#2
Gianmarco Ferri, Barbara Storti, Ranieri Bizzarri
Recent data indicate that nuclear lamina (NL) plays a relevant role in many fundamental cellular functions. The peculiar role of NL in cells is dramatically demonstrated by the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an inherited laminopathy that causes premature, rapid aging shortly after birth. In HGPS, a mutant form of Lamin A (progeria) leads to a dysmorphic NL structure, but how this perturbation is transduced into cellular changes is still largely unknown. Owing to the close structural relationship between NL and the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC), in this work we test whether HGPS affects passive and active nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of cargoes by means of an established model based of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching...
June 28, 2017: Biophysical Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28674081/mg132-induced-progerin-clearance-is-mediated-by-autophagy-activation-and-splicing-regulation
#3
Karim Harhouri, Claire Navarro, Danielle Depetris, Marie-Geneviève Mattei, Xavier Nissan, Pierre Cau, Annachiara De Sandre-Giovannoli, Nicolas Lévy
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal premature and accelerated aging disease caused by a de novo point mutation in LMNA encoding A-type lamins. Progerin, a truncated and toxic prelamin A issued from aberrant splicing, accumulates in HGPS cells' nuclei and is a hallmark of the disease. Small amounts of progerin are also produced during normal aging. We show that progerin is sequestered into abnormally shaped promyelocytic nuclear bodies, identified as novel biomarkers in late passage HGPS cell lines...
July 3, 2017: EMBO Molecular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28660486/hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome-a-premature-aging-disease
#4
REVIEW
Muhammad Saad Ahmed, Sana Ikram, Nousheen Bibi, Asif Mir
Progeria is sporadic, very rare, autosomal dominant, deadly childhood disorder. It is one of the progeroid syndromes also known as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Aging is a developmental process that begins with fertilization and ends up with death involving a lot of environmental and genetic factors. The disease firstly involves premature aging and then death from complications of atherosclerosis such as myocardial infarction, stroke, atherosclerosis, or heart failure. The lifespan of the patient is normally up to teen age or early twenties...
June 28, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597562/reprogramming-progeria-fibroblasts-re-establishes-a-normal-epigenetic-landscape
#5
Zhaoyi Chen, Wing Y Chang, Alton Etheridge, Hilmar Strickfaden, Zhigang Jin, Gareth Palidwor, Ji-Hoon Cho, Kai Wang, Sarah Y Kwon, Carole Doré, Angela Raymond, Akitsu Hotta, James Ellis, Rita A Kandel, F Jeffrey Dilworth, Theodore J Perkins, Michael J Hendzel, David J Galas, William L Stanford
Ideally, disease modeling using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables analysis of disease initiation and progression. This requires any pathological features of the patient cells used for reprogramming to be eliminated during iPSC generation. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental premature aging disorder caused by the accumulation of the truncated form of Lamin A known as Progerin within the nuclear lamina. Cellular hallmarks of HGPS include nuclear blebbing, loss of peripheral heterochromatin, defective epigenetic inheritance, altered gene expression, and senescence...
August 2017: Aging Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28557611/lamin-a-and-microtubules-collaborate-to-maintain-nuclear-morphology
#6
Zeshan Tariq, Haoyue Zhang, Alexander Chia-Liu, Yang Shen, Yantenew Gete, Zheng-Mei Xiong, Claire Tocheny, Leonard Campanello, Di Wu, Wolfgang Losert, Kan Cao
Lamin A (LA) is a critical structural component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations within the LA gene (LMNA) lead to several human disorders, most striking of which is Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a premature aging disorder. HGPS cells are best characterized by an abnormal nuclear morphology known as nuclear blebbing, which arises due to the accumulation of progerin, a dominant mutant form of LA. The microtubule (MT) network is known to mediate changes in nuclear morphology in the context of specific events such as mitosis, cell polarization, nucleus positioning and cellular migration...
May 30, 2017: Nucleus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515154/progerin-sequestration-of-pcna-promotes-replication-fork-collapse-and-mislocalization-of-xpa-in-laminopathy-related-progeroid-syndromes
#7
Benjamin A Hilton, Ji Liu, Brian M Cartwright, Yiyong Liu, Maya Breitman, Youjie Wang, Rowdy Jones, Hui Tang, Antonio Rusinol, Phillip R Musich, Yue Zou
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder that is caused by a point mutation in the LMNA gene resulting in production of a truncated farnesylated-prelamin A protein (progerin). We previously reported that XPA mislocalized to the progerin-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites, blocking DSB repair, which led to DSB accumulation, DNA damage responses, and early replication arrest in HGPS. In this study, the XPA mislocalization to DSBs occurred at stalled or collapsed replication forks, concurrent with a significant loss of PCNA at the forks, whereas PCNA efficiently bound to progerin...
May 17, 2017: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483909/progerin-induced-replication-stress-facilitates-premature-senescence-in-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome
#8
Keith Wheaton, Denise Campuzano, Weili Ma, Michal Sheinis, Brandon Ho, Grant W Brown, Samuel Benchimol
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in LMNA that produces an aberrant lamin A protein, progerin. The accumulation of progerin in HGPS cells leads to an aberrant nuclear morphology, genetic instability, and p53-dependent premature senescence. How p53 is activated in response to progerin production is unknown. Here we show that young cycling HGPS fibroblasts exhibit chronic DNA damage, primarily in S phase, as well as delayed replication fork progression. We demonstrate that progerin binds to PCNA, altering its distribution away from replicating DNA in HGPS cells, leading to γH2AX formation, ATR activation, and RPA Ser33 phosphorylation...
July 15, 2017: Molecular and Cellular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28477268/expression-of-progerin-does-not-result-in-an-increased-mutation-rate
#9
Emmanuelle Deniaud, Charlene Lemaître, Shelagh Boyle, Wendy A Bickmore
In the premature ageing disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), the underlying genetic defect in the lamin A gene leads to accumulation at the nuclear lamina of progerin-a mutant form of lamin A that cannot be correctly processed. This has been reported to result in defects in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair, leading to the hypothesis that, as in normal ageing and in other progeroid syndromes caused by mutation of genes of the DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways, increased DNA damage may be responsible for the premature ageing phenotypes in HGPS patients...
May 6, 2017: Chromosome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28423660/progerin-impairs-vascular-smooth-muscle-cell-growth-via-the-dna-damage-response-pathway
#10
Daisuke Kinoshita, Ayako Nagasawa, Ippei Shimizu, Takashi K Ito, Yohko Yoshida, Masanori Tsuchida, Atsushi Iwama, Toshiya Hayano, Tohru Minamino
Mutations of the lamin A gene cause various premature aging syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and atypical Werner syndrome. In HGPS (but not atypical Werner syndrome), extensive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells leads to myocardial infarction with premature death. The underlying mechanisms how single gene mutations can cause various phenotypes are largely unknown. We performed an interactome analysis using mutant forms of lamin A involved in progeroid syndromes. We found that the mutant lamin A responsible for HGPS, known as progerin, could not bind to proteins related to the DNA damage response, including DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)...
May 23, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420447/ck2-1-a-bone-morphogenetic-protein-receptor-type-ia-mimetic-peptide-repairs-cartilage-in-mice-with-destabilized-medial-meniscus
#11
Hemanth Akkiraju, Padma Pradeepa Srinivasan, Xian Xu, Xinqiao Jia, Catherine B Kirn Safran, Anja Nohe
BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee involves degeneration of articular cartilage of the diarthrodial joints. Current treatment options temporarily relieve the joint pain but do not restore the lost cartilage. We recently designed a novel bone morphogenetic protein receptor type I (BMPRI) mimetic peptide, CK2.1, that activates BMPRIa signaling in the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Our previous research demonstrated that CK2.1 induced chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo; however, it is unknown if CK2...
April 18, 2017: Stem Cell Research & Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317242/chemical-screening-identifies-rock-as-a-target-for-recovering-mitochondrial-function-in-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome
#12
Hyun Tae Kang, Joon Tae Park, Kobong Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia Choi, Chul Won Jung, Gyu Ree Kim, Young-Sam Lee, Sang Chul Park
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent...
June 2017: Aging Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314379/rejuvenation-by-partial-reprogramming-of-the-epigenome
#13
REVIEW
Andrew R Mendelsohn, James W Larrick, Jennifer L Lei
Epigenetic variation with age is one of the most important hallmarks of aging. Resetting or repairing the epigenome of aging cells in intact animals may rejuvenate the cells and perhaps the entire organism. In fact, differentiated adult cells, which by definition have undergone some epigenetic changes, are capable of being rejuvenated and reprogrammed to create pluripotent stem cells and viable cloned animals. Apparently, such reprogramming is capable of completely resetting the epigenome. However, attempts to fully reprogram differentiated cells in adult animals have failed in part because reprogramming leads to the formation of teratomas...
April 2017: Rejuvenation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229933/nuclear-lamins-and-progerin-are-dispensable-for-antioxidant-nrf2-response-to-arsenic-and-cadmium
#14
Kazunori Hashimoto, Rima Majumdar, Yoshiaki Tsuji
Lamins are important constituents of the nuclear inner membrane and provide a platform for transcription factors and chromatin. Progerin, a C-terminal truncated lamin A mutant, causes premature aging termed Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Oxidative stress appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of HGPS, although the mechanistic role of progerin remains elusive. Here we examined whether nuclear lamins are important for a cellular antioxidant mechanism, and whether progerin compromises it. We investigated the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) which regulates various antioxidant genes including heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), following exposure to sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride in lamin knockdown human cell lines and primary HGPS human fibroblasts...
May 2017: Cellular Signalling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211642/biomechanical-strain-exacerbates-inflammation-on-a-progeria-on-a-chip-model
#15
João Ribas, Yu Shrike Zhang, Patrícia R Pitrez, Jeroen Leijten, Mario Miscuglio, Jeroen Rouwkema, Mehmet Remzi Dokmeci, Xavier Nissan, Lino Ferreira, Ali Khademhosseini
Organ-on-a-chip platforms seek to recapitulate the complex microenvironment of human organs using miniaturized microfluidic devices. Besides modeling healthy organs, these devices have been used to model diseases, yielding new insights into pathophysiology. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease showing accelerated vascular aging, leading to the death of patients due to cardiovascular diseases. HGPS targets primarily vascular cells, which reside in mechanically active tissues...
April 2017: Small
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192606/metformin-alleviates-ageing-cellular-phenotypes-in-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome-dermal-fibroblasts
#16
Seul-Ki Park, Ok Sarah Shin
Metformin is a popular antidiabetic biguanide, which has been considered as a candidate drug for cancer treatment and ageing prevention. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a devastating disease characterized by premature ageing and severe age-associated complications leading to death. The effects of metformin on HGPS dermal fibroblasts remain largely undefined. In this study, we investigated whether metformin could exert a beneficial effect on nuclear abnormalities and delay senescence in fibroblasts derived from HGPS patients...
February 13, 2017: Experimental Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974395/lamins-and-metabolism
#17
REVIEW
Chayki Charar, Yosef Gruenbaum
Lamins are nuclear intermediate filaments (IFs) with important roles in most nuclear activities, including nuclear organization and cell-cycle progression. Mutations in human lamins cause over 17 different diseases, termed laminopathies. Most of these diseases are autosomal dominant and can be roughly divided into four major groups: muscle diseases, peripheral neuronal diseases, accelerated aging disorders and metabolic diseases including Dunnigan type familial partial lipodystrophy (FLPD), acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL) and autosomal dominant leucodystrophy...
January 1, 2017: Clinical Science (1979-)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929926/comparing-lamin-proteins-post-translational-relative-stability-using-a-2a-peptide-based-system-reveals-elevated-resistance-of-progerin-to-cellular-degradation
#18
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Di Wu, Phillip A Yates, Haoyue Zhang, Kan Cao
Nuclear lamins are the major components of the nuclear lamina at the periphery of the nucleus, supporting the nuclear envelope and participating in many nuclear processes, including DNA replication, transcription and chromatin organization. A group of diseases, the laminopathies, is associated with mutations in lamin genes. One of the most striking cases is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) which is the consequence of a lamin A dominant negative mutant named progerin. Due to the abnormal presence of a permanent C-terminal farnesyl tail, progerin gradually accumulates on the nuclear membrane, perturbing a diversity of signalings and transcriptional events...
November 2016: Nucleus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920058/a-novel-somatic-mutation-achieves-partial-rescue-in-a-child-with-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome
#19
Daniel Z Bar, Martin F Arlt, Joan F Brazier, Wendy E Norris, Susan E Campbell, Peter Chines, Delphine Larrieu, Stephen P Jackson, Francis S Collins, Thomas W Glover, Leslie B Gordon
BACKGROUND: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal sporadic autosomal dominant premature ageing disease caused by single base mutations that optimise a cryptic splice site within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. The resultant disease-causing protein, progerin, acts as a dominant negative. Disease severity relies partly on progerin levels. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report a novel form of somatic mosaicism, where a child possessed two cell populations with different HGPS disease-producing mutations of the same nucleotide-one producing severe HGPS and one mild HGPS...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907109/loss-of-h3k9me3-correlates-with-atm-activation-and-histone-h2ax-phosphorylation-deficiencies-in-hutchinson-gilford-progeria-syndrome
#20
Haoyue Zhang, Linlin Sun, Kun Wang, Di Wu, Mason Trappio, Celeste Witting, Kan Cao
Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR) plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). In this study, we explore the potential connection(s) between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox), double strand breaks (DSBs) are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) within an hour...
2016: PloS One
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