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Huawang Wu, Hui Sun, Chao Wang, Lin Yu, Yilan Li, Hongjun Peng, Xiaobing Lu, Qingmao Hu, Yuping Ning, Tianzi Jiang, Jinping Xu, Jiaojian Wang
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that is characterized by cognitive deficits and affective symptoms. To date, an increasing number of neuroimaging studies have focused on emotion regulation and have consistently shown that emotion dysregulation is one of the central features and underlying mechanisms of MDD. Although gray matter morphological abnormalities in regions within emotion regulation networks have been identified in MDD, the interactions and relationships between these gray matter structures remain largely unknown...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Danica Petrovic, Milan Perovic, Biljana Lazovic, Igor Pantic
Relationship between physical activity and mental disorders in late pregnancy is unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that there is a significant association between the time spent on walking and symptoms of depression and anxiety in antenatal period. The cross-sectional study was done on a sample of 200 healthy women in 9th month of physiological pregnancy at Health center Kraljevo, Serbia during 2015. Each participant was given a questionnaire consisting of general questions regarding physical activity, pregnancy, and other parameters...
October 8, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Isabelle F van der Velpen, Stephanie Feleus, Anne Suzanne Bertens, Behnam Sabayan
INTRODUCTION: Cardiac function is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in the brain. Heart failure is closely related to higher risk of neurocognitive disorders. Recent evidence shows that this relationship might not be limited to patients with advanced heart failure, and even suboptimal cardiac functioning is associated with accelerated brain aging. Hence, hemodynamic and serum cardiac markers may provide valuable information about the risk of dementia. METHODS: We provide an overview on the link between cardiac markers and cognitive function by a systematic search in five databases...
October 19, 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Nancy M Lee, Cevat Erisken, Thomas Iskratsch, Michael Sheetz, William N Levine, Helen H Lu
Physiologically relevant models of wound healing are essential for understanding the biology of connective tissue repair and healing. They can also be used to identify key cellular processes and matrix characteristics critical for the design of soft tissue grafts. Modeling the various stages of repair post tendon injury, polymer meshes of varying fiber diameter (nano-1 (390 nm) < nano-2 (740 nm) < micro (1420 nm)) were produced. Alignment was also introduced in the nano-2 group to model matrix undergoing biological healing rather than scar formation...
October 12, 2016: Biomaterials
Shigeto Sato, Masato Koike, Manabu Funayama, Junji Ezaki, Takahiro Fukuda, Takashi Ueno, Yasuo Uchiyama, Nobutaka Hattori
Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS) is an autosomal recessive form of early-onset parkinsonism linked to the PARK9 locus. The causative gene for KRS is Atp13a2, which encodes a lysosomal type 5 P-type ATPase. We recently showed that KRS/PARK9-linked mutations lead to several lysosomal alterations, including reduced proteolytic processing of cathepsin D in vitro. However, it remains unknown how deficiency of Atp13a2 is connected to lysosomal impairments. To address this issue, we analyzed brain tissues of Atp13a2 conditional-knockout mice, which exhibited characteristic features of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, including accumulation of lipofuscin positive for subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, suggesting that a common pathogenic mechanism underlies both neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and Parkinson disease...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Pathology
Allison C Nugent, Bruce Luber, Frederick W Carver, Stephen E Robinson, Richard Coppola, Carlos A Zarate
Recently, independent components analysis (ICA) of resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings has revealed resting state networks (RSNs) that exhibit fluctuations of band-limited power envelopes. Most of the work in this area has concentrated on networks derived from the power envelope of beta bandpass-filtered data. Although research has demonstrated that most networks show maximal correlation in the beta band, little is known about how spatial patterns of correlations may differ across frequencies...
October 22, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
Thomas Vanicek, Alexandra Kutzelnigg, Cecile Philippe, Helen L Sigurdardottir, Gregory M James, Andreas Hahn, Georg S Kranz, Anna Höflich, Alexander Kautzky, Tatjana Traub-Weidinger, Marcus Hacker, Wolfgang Wadsak, Markus Mitterhauser, Siegfried Kasper, Rupert Lanzenberger
Altered serotonergic neurotransmission has been found to cause impulsive and aggressive behavior, as well as increased motor activity, all exemplifying key symptoms of ADHD. The main objectives of this positron emission tomography (PET) study were to investigate the serotonin transporter binding potential (SERT BPND ) in patients with ADHD and to assess associations of SERT BPND between the brain regions. 25 medication-free patients with ADHD (age ± SD; 32.39 ± 10.15;10 females) without any psychiatric comorbidity and 25 age and sex matched healthy control subjects (33...
October 22, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
Danielle Douglas, Sathesan Thavabalasingam, Zahraa Chorghay, Edward B O'Neil, Morgan D Barense, Andy C H Lee
Surprisingly little is known about how the brain combines spatial elements to form a coherent percept. Regions that may underlie this process include the hippocampus (HC) and parahippocampal place area (PPA), regions central to spatial perception but whose role in spatial coherency has not been explored. Participants were scanned with functional MRI while they judged whether Escher-like scenes were possible or impossible. Univariate analyses revealed differential HC and PPA involvement, with greater HC activity during spatial incoherency detection and more PPA activity during spatial coherency detection...
October 22, 2016: Hippocampus
M Nikkhou, M Škarabot, S Čopar, I Muševič
We study topological defect annihilation on a glass fibre with homeotropic surface anchoring of nematic liquid crystal molecules. The fibre is set parallel to the nematic director of a planar cell with variable thickness and we create pairs of Saturn ring and Saturn anti-ring using the laser tweezers. In thick cells we observe in the whole region of defect separation a Coulomb-like pair attraction with no background force, [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text]. In cells with thickness comparable to glass fibre diameter, we observe the Coulomb-like attraction only at small separations of the defect pair...
October 2016: European Physical Journal. E, Soft Matter
Daniela Mier, Sarah Eisenacher, Franziska Rausch, Susanne Englisch, Martin Fungisai Gerchen, Vera Zamoscik, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, Mathias Zink, Peter Kirsch
Schizophrenia is associated with significant impairments in social cognition. These impairments have been shown to go along with altered activation of the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). However, studies that investigate connectivity of pSTS during social cognition in schizophrenia are sparse. Twenty-two patients with schizophrenia and 22 matched healthy controls completed a social-cognitive task for functional magnetic resonance imaging that allows the investigation of affective Theory of Mind (ToM), emotion recognition and the processing of neutral facial expressions...
October 21, 2016: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
Minoo Heidari Kani, Eng-Cheng Chan, Roger C Young, Trent Butler, Roger Smith, Jonathan W Paul
Research insights into uterine function and the mechanisms of labour have been hindered by the lack of suitable animal and cellular models. The use of traditional culturing methods limits the exploration of complex uterine functions, such as cell interactions, connectivity and contractile behaviour, as it fails to mimic the three-dimensional (3D) nature of uterine cell interactions in vivo. Animal models are an option, however, use of these models is constrained by ethical considerations as well as translational limitations to humans...
October 21, 2016: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Frances Marcus Lewis, Kristin A Griffith, Amy Walker, Robin M Lally, Elizabeth T Loggers, Ellen H Zahlis, Mary Ellen Shands, Zainab Alzawad, Hebah Al Mulla, Nai-Ching Chi
PURPOSE: The purposes of the study were to (1) test the short-term impact of a telephone-delivered cancer parenting education program, the Enhancing Connections-Telephone (EC-T) Program, on maternal anxiety, depressed mood, parenting competencies, and child behavioral-emotional adjustment and (2) compare those outcomes with outcomes achieved from an in-person delivery of the same program (EC). METHODS: Thirty-two mothers comprised the sample for the within-group design and 77 mothers for the between-group design...
October 21, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Vicky Long
This article examines Scottish provision of psychiatric care in the 1960s and 1970s. It demonstrates that institutional services did not rapidly disappear across the UK following the Ministry of Health's decision to shut down psychiatric hospitals in 1961, and highlights Scotland's distinctive trajectory. Furthermore, it contends that psychiatric hospitals developed new approaches to assist patients in this era, thereby contributing towards the transformation of post-war psychiatric practice. Connecting a discussion of policy with an analysis of provision, it examines the Department of Health for Scotland's cautious response to the Ministry's embrace of deinstitutionalization, before analysing Glasgow's psychiatric provision in the 1970s...
October 21, 2016: History of Psychiatry
Guillaume Martin, Lionel Roques
Various models describe asexual evolution by mutation, selection and drift. Some focus directly on fitness, typically modelling drift but ignoring or simplifying both epistasis and the distribution of mutation effects (travelling wave models). Others follow the dynamics of quantitative traits determining fitness (Fisher's geometrical model), imposing a complex but fixed form of mutation effects and epistasis, and often ignoring drift. In all cases, predictions are typically obtained in high or low mutation rate limits and for long-term stationary regimes, thus loosing information on transient behaviors and the effect of initial conditions...
October 21, 2016: Genetics
Louise Hetherington, Elena Schneider, Caroline Scott, David DeKretser, Charles H Muller, Hubert Hondermarck, Tony Velkov, Mark A Baker
Globally, approximately 1 in 15 men of reproductive age are infertile, yet the precise mechanisms underlying their gamete failure are unknown. Although a semen-analysis is performed to determine fertilizing potential, the diagnostic suitability of this analysis has been questioned in several reports, as many men, classified as "infertile" according to their semen analysis, subsequently turn out to be fertile. Herein, we have used a quantitative (phospho)-proteomic analysis, using enrichment on titanium dioxide followed by ion-trap mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), to compare the semen of infertile versus fertile males...
October 21, 2016: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics: MCP
Francesc R Garcia-Gonzalo, Jeremy F Reiter
Cilia are plasma membrane protrusions that act as cellular propellers or antennae. To perform these functions, cilia must maintain a composition distinct from those of the contiguous cytosol and plasma membrane. The specialized composition of the cilium depends on the ciliary gate, the region at the ciliary base separating the cilium from the rest of the cell. The ciliary gate's main structural features are electron dense struts connecting microtubules to the adjacent membrane. These structures include the transition fibers, which connect the distal basal body to the base of the ciliary membrane, and the Y-links, which connect the proximal axoneme and ciliary membrane within the transition zone...
October 21, 2016: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology
Fraser Henderson, Istvan Takacs
BACKGROUND: Troubleshooting of deep brain stimulators (Activa SC/PC/RC Medtronic PLC) sometimes results in a decision to replace a tunneled stretch-coil extension cable. We present a simple technique to accomplish this atraumatically without a tunneling tool. OBJECTIVES: In the treatment of patients with deep brain stimulators, complication avoidance and efficiency of operative time are paramount. We sought to find the most safe, effective, and rapid method for performing the conceptually-simple yet technically-nuanced act of replacing lead extension cables...
October 18, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Guoliang Sa, Xuepeng Xiong, Jiangang Ren, Yifang Zhao, Sangang He
Several animal models have been used in studies associated with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF); however, an appropriate model based on the histopathological characteristics of OSF is still needed. This study aimed to provide histological references for selecting a potential model. The expression intensities of collagen type I (Col I), type III (Col III), type IV (Col IV), fibronectin (FN), transforming growth factors β (TGF-β), and connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) in the oral mucosa of the human and six non-human animal species were measured by immunohistochemistry...
October 18, 2016: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Delfo D'Alessandro, Giuseppe Perale, Mario Milazzo, Stefania Moscato, Cesare Stefanini, Gianni Pertici, Serena Danti
The ideal scaffold for bone regeneration is required to be highly porous, non-immunogenic, biostable until the new tissue formation, bioresorbable and osteoconductive. This study aimed at investigating the process of new bone formation in patients treated with granular SmartBone(®) for sinus augmentation, providing an extensive histologic analysis. Five biopsies were collected at 4-9 months post SmartBone(®) implantation and processed for histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometric analysis was performed...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Pharmaceutics
Franziska Richter, Julia Gerstenberger, Anne Bauer, Chun-Chi Liang, Angelika Richter
Hereditary generalized dystonia is often caused by a GAG deletion in TOR1A (DYT1) that encodes for the protein torsinA. Although mutation carriers show alterations in neuronal connectivity and sensorimotor deficits, only 30% develop dystonia. Uncovering the factors triggering the dystonic symptoms and underlying pathophysiology would greatly benefit the development of more effective therapies. In DYT1 knock-in (KI) mice, the expression of torsinA mutant alters the connectivity of neurons and the function of striatal cholinergic interneurons...
October 18, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
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