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Transgender disparities

Kristen Emory, Francisco O Buchting, Dennis R Trinidad, Lisa Vera, Sherry L Emery
Background: LGBT populations use tobacco at disparately higher rates nationwide, compared to national averages. The tobacco industry has a history targeting LGBT with marketing efforts, likely contributing to this disparity. This study explores whether exposure to tobacco content on traditional and social media is associated with tobacco use among LGBT and non-LGBT. Methods: This study reports results from LGBT (N=1,092) and non-LGBT (N=16,430) respondents to a 2013 nationally representative cross-sectional online survey of US adults (N=17,522)...
March 12, 2018: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Elizabeth A McConnell, Patrick Janulis, Gregory Phillips, Roky Truong, Michelle Birkett
Minority stress theory has widespread research support in explaining health disparities experienced by sexual and gender minorities. However, less is known about how minority stress impacts multiply marginalized groups, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color (LGBT POC). Also, although research has documented resilience in the face of minority stress at the individual level, research is needed that examines macro-level processes such as community resilience (Meyer, 2015). In the current study, we integrate minority stress theory and intersectionality theory to examine multiple minority stress (i...
March 2018: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Carmen H Logie, Candice L Lys, Nicole Schott, Lisa Dias, Makenzie R Zouboules, Kayley Mackay
Scant research has addressed health and well-being among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) persons in the Arctic. The Northwest Territories (NWT) has among Canada's highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). LGBTQ persons in NWT are at the nexus of LGBTQ and Arctic health disparities. Yet little is known of their sexual health needs. This qualitative study explored the sexual health needs of LGBTQ persons in the NWT. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 51 participants, including 16 LGBTQ youth aged 15-24, 21 LGBTQ adults aged 25 and above, and 14 key informants who worked with LGBTQ persons...
March 13, 2018: Global Public Health
Mindy Millard-Stafford, Ann E Swanson, Matthew T Wittbrodt
Men outperform women in sports requiring muscular strength and/or endurance, but the relative influence of "nurture" versus "nature" remains difficult to quantify. Performance gaps between elite men and women are well-documented using world records in second, centimeter or kilogram sports. However, this approach is biased by global disparity in reward structures and opportunities for women. Despite policies enhancing female participation (Title IX legislation), USA women only closed performance gaps by 2 and 5% in Olympic Trial swimming and running, respectively, from 1972 to 1980 (with no change thereafter through 2016)...
February 21, 2018: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Brian A Rood, Jennifer J Kochaver, Elizabeth A McConnell, Miles Q Ott, David W Pantalone
The majority of published research on transgender health focuses on associations between external minority stressors (e.g., discrimination) and health. Little is known about how internal minority stressors (e.g., identity concealment and expecting rejection) might predict HIV disparities. The current study addresses this gap by examining the association between external and internal minority stressors and sexual risk behaviors and HIV testing history in a sample of 300 transgender adults across the U.S. Transgender-related discrimination and expecting rejection were associated with sexual risk behaviors...
February 20, 2018: AIDS and Behavior
Daniel Shumer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 5, 2018: Pediatrics
Jordon D Bosse, Raeann G Leblanc, Kasey Jackman, Ragnhildur I Bjarnadottir
Individuals in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities experience several disparities in physical and mental health (eg, cardiovascular disease and depression), as well as difficulty accessing care that is compassionate and relevant to their unique needs. Access to care is compromised in part due to inadequate information systems that fail to capture identity data. Beginning in January 2018, meaningful use criteria dictate that electronic health records have the capability to collect data related to sexual orientation and gender identity of patients...
February 5, 2018: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: CIN
Phoenix Alicia Matthews, Amanda C Blok, Joseph G L Lee, Brian Hitsman, Lisa Sanchez-Johnsen, Karriem Watson, Elizabeth Breen, Raymond Ruiz, Scout, Melissa A Simon, Marian Fitzgibbon, Laura C Hein, Robert Winn
The Society of Behavioral Medicine supports the inclusion of gender and sexual minorities in all local, state, and national tobacco prevention and control activities. These activities include surveillance of tobacco use and cessation activities, targeted outreach and awareness campaigns, increasing access to culturally appropriate tobacco use dependence treatments, and restricting disproportionate marketing to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities by the tobacco industry, especially for mentholated tobacco products...
January 27, 2018: Translational Behavioral Medicine
Jeffrey Drope, Alex C Liber, Zachary Cahn, Michal Stoklosa, Rosemary Kennedy, Clifford E Douglas, Rosemarie Henson, Jacqui Drope
The continuing high prevalence of cigarette smoking among specific subpopulations, many of them vulnerable, is one of the most pressing challenges facing the tobacco control community. These populations include individuals in lower education and/or socioeconomic groups; from certain racial/ethnic groups; in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; with mental illness; and in the military, particularly among those in the lowest pay grades. Although traditional tobacco control measures are having positive health effects for most groups, the effects are not sufficient for others...
January 31, 2018: CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Hannah Brooks, Carrie D Llewellyn, Tom Nadarzynski, Fernando Castilho Pelloso, Felipe De Souza Guilherme, Alex Pollard, Christina J Jones
BACKGROUND: Significant health disparities between sexual minority individuals (that is, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender [LGBT]) and heterosexual individuals have been demonstrated. AIM: To understand the barriers and facilitators to sexual orientation (SO) disclosure experienced by LGBT adults in healthcare settings. DESIGN AND SETTING: Mixed methods systematic review, including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods papers following PRISMA guidelines...
March 2018: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
Alicia K Matthews, Elizabeth Breen, Priyoth Kittiteerasack
OBJECTIVES: To describe the extant literature on social determinants of health as they relate to the cancer disparities and to highlight the research findings relating to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. DATA SOURCES: Published scientific literature and clinical literature, and published reports from the World Health Organization and US Department of Health and Human Services. CONCLUSION: The larger literature on health inequities is moving beyond individual-level predictors of risk to evaluate the influence of social determinants of health on the persistent health inequalities in a population...
January 17, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Elizabeth W Diemer, Jaclyn M White Hughto, Allegra R Gordon, Carly Guss, S Bryn Austin, Sari L Reisner
Purpose: To investigate whether the prevalence of eating disorders (EDs) differs across diverse gender identity groups in a transgender sample. Methods: Secondary analysis of data from Project VOICE, a cross-sectional study of stress and health among 452 transgender adults (ages 18-75 years) residing in Massachusetts. Age-adjusted logistic regression models were fit to compare the prevalence of self-reported lifetime EDs in female-to-male (FTM), male-to-female (MTF), and gender-nonconforming participants assigned male at birth (MBGNC) to gender-nonconforming participants assigned female at birth (FBGNC; referent)...
2018: Transgender Health
Yi Gao, Toby Maurer, Paradi Mirmirani
In the United States, an increasing number of individuals are identifying as transgender. Males at birth who identify as females are called male-to-female (MTF) transgender individuals or trans women, and females at birth who identify as males are called female-to-male (FTM) transgender individuals or trans men. The transgender patient population possess unique health concerns disparate from those of the general populace. Exogenous hormone therapy for transgender patients leads to changes in the distribution and pattern of hair growth...
January 19, 2018: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Jason A Park, Joshua D Safer
Purpose: Transgender individuals are medically underserved in the United States and face many documented disparities in care due to providers' lack of education, training, and comfort. We have previously demonstrated that specific transgender medicine content in a medical school curriculum increases students' willingness to treat transgender patients. However, we have also identified that those same students are less comfortable with transgender care relative to care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual patients...
2018: Transgender Health
Ariella R Tabaac, Megan E Sutter, Catherine S J Wall, Kellan E Baker
INTRODUCTION: Transgender (trans) and gender-nonconforming adults have reported reduced access to health care because of discrimination and lack of knowledgeable care. This study aimed to contribute to the nascent cancer prevention literature among trans and gender-nonconforming individuals by ascertaining rates of breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancer screening behaviors by gender identity. METHODS: Publicly available de-identified data from the 2014-2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys were utilized to evaluate rates of cancer screenings by gender identity, while controlling for healthcare access, sociodemographics, and survey year...
January 12, 2018: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Ulrike Boehmer
OBJECTIVE: To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. DATA SOURCES: Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. CONCLUSION: There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available...
January 12, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
David Rice, Matthew B Schabath
OBJECTIVES: To synthesize state of the knowledge collected in this volume and propose future directions for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer practice, education, research, and advocacy. DATA SOURCES: Current and extant literature. CONCLUSION: Health care disparities that are known but not yet fully elucidated in the LGBT population carry into the cancer arena. Substantially more effort is required in the domains of patient care, nursing practice, nursing and patient-facing services provider education, patient education, nursing and interprofessional research, governmental commitment, professional organization action, and patient advocacy...
January 9, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Marc Ceres, Gwendolyn P Quinn, Matthew Loscalzo, David Rice
OBJECTIVES: To describe the current state of cancer screening and uptake for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and to propose cancer screening considerations for LGBT persons. DATA SOURCES: Current and historic published literature on cancer screening and LGBT cancer screening; published national guidelines. CONCLUSION: Despite known cancer risks for members of the LGBT community, cancer screening rates are often low, and there are gaps in screening recommendations for LGBT persons...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Asa Radix, Shail Maingi
OBJECTIVES: To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. DATA SOURCES: A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Christopher F Drescher, Eliot J Lopez, James A Griffin, Thomas M Toomey, Elizabeth D Eldridge, Lara M Stepleman
BACKGROUND: Smoking prevalence for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals is higher than for heterosexual, cisgender individuals. Elevated smoking rates have been linked to psychiatric comorbidities, substance use, poverty, low education levels, and stress. OBJECTIVES: This study examined mental health (MH) correlates of cigarette use in LGBT individuals residing in a metropolitan area in the southeastern United States. METHODS: Participants were 335 individuals from an LGBT health needs assessment (mean age 34...
January 5, 2018: Substance Use & Misuse
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