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approach emergency abdominal pain

Manuel Guerrero-Hernandez, Carlos A Hinojosa, Javier E Anaya-Ayala, Erika Elenes, Aldo Torre
Portal vein (PV) thrombosis (PVT) in the absence of liver disease or thrombophilia is rare. We report a 57-year-old male with a history of stage 3 chronic kidney disease who presented at the emergency department 18 months after abdominal surgery with progressive abdominal pain and distention. Computed tomography revealed PVT with multiple collaterals and moderate ascites. He had undergone partial gastrectomy and gastrojejunal anastomosis at an outside facility for gastrointestinal stromal tumors that caused an iatrogenic stenotic lesion in the PV...
October 20, 2016: Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Katherine Lambe, Judy Currey, Julie Considine
BACKGROUND: Understanding of clinical deterioration of emergency department patients is rapidly evolving. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and nature of vital sign collection and clinical deterioration in emergency care. METHODS: A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from the records of 200 randomly selected adults with presenting complaints of abdominal pain, shortness of breath, chest pain and febrile illness from 1 January to 31 December 2014 at a 22 bed emergency department in Melbourne, Australia...
October 7, 2016: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal: AENJ
Ting-Chia Yeh
BACKGROUND: Duodenum diverticulum is the most common site for diverticular disease of small intestine. Most of duodenal diverticulum are asymptomatic, but complicated or perforated duodenal diverticulum is rare. Nonoperative management is attractive in selected patients, because of higher surgical complications. We suggest the use of a minimally invasive operative method as an alternative approach for the management of complicated duodenal diverticulum, especially when conservative treatment has failed...
October 5, 2016: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Daniela Alves, Maria Eufémia Calmeiro, Rosa Silva, Hugo Coelho
A 70-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer, previously submitted to surgical castration and trans-urethral resection of the prostate, was admitted to Accident and Emergency department. He had been suffering from osteoarticular and abdominal pain, and recent weight loss. An abdominal and a pelvic CT showed multiple hepatic metastases and a pelvic mass, but his prostate-specific antigen values were low (0.26 n/mL). A biopsy of a hepatic metastasis and of the pelvic mass revealed a small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer, a rare and aggressive androgen-independent form of prostate cancer with a poor prognosis...
October 5, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Hasan Rehman, Elizabeth John, Payal Parikh
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent diagnosis made in the emergency department and can present in many different ways. Abdominal pain is an unusual presenting symptom for PE. It is essential to maintain a high degree of suspicion in these patients, as a delay in diagnosis can be devastating for the patient and confers a high risk of mortality if left untreated. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with worsening right upper quadrant abdominal pain with fevers...
2016: Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
Jennifer Hrabe, Brooke Gurland
Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure...
September 2016: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Yvonne Ying-Ru Ng, James Chi-Yong Ngu, Andrew Siang-Yih Wong
BACKGROUND: Although adhesions account for more than 70% of small bowel obstruction (SBO), they are thought to be less likely aetiologies in patients without previous abdominal surgery. Expedient surgery has historically been advocated as prudent management in these patients. Emerging evidence appears to challenge such a dogmatic approach. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed in all SBO patients with a virgin abdomen admitted between January 2012 and August 2014...
August 25, 2016: ANZ Journal of Surgery
Richard Slama, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
INTRODUCTION: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a deadly condition, particularly with rupture. Emergency physicians provide vital frontline care to the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) has become the gold standard for treatment of AAA, but the management of EVAR complications is not well discussed in the emergency medicine literature. OBJECTIVE OF THIS REVIEW: The purpose of this article is to provide an emergency medicine-focused review of the complications of EVAR...
October 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Giuseppe Piccinni, Giuseppe Massimiliano De Luca, Stefano Lafranceschina, Antonio Biondi, Andrea Marzullo, Angela Gurrado, Mario Testini
Endometriosis occurs in 5%-10% of fertile women, usually in the pelvic region, such as the ovaries, uterine ligaments, pelvic peritoneum, and rectovaginal septum. A mesenteric endometriotic cyst is an exceptional observation and difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We report a case of a large mesenteric endometriotic cyst treated by laparoscopy. A 21-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted as an emergency to our Academic Hospital on the 30th day postpartum for abdominal pain and a palpable epigastric mass. A CT scan revealed a mass measuring 7...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
Hasan S Massloom
CONTEXT: Diagnosis of congenital Bochdalek's hernia (BH) in adulthood is extremely rare and requires a fastidious surgical repair, the failure of which might result in a recurrence with severe complications. We report a rare case of a giant, right BH that recurred after surgical repair and was complicated with complete bowel obstruction. CASE REPORT: A 51-year-old Saudi male, with past surgical history of laparotomy that failed to repair BH, presented to the emergency room with severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and hypovolemic shock...
June 2016: North American Journal of Medical Sciences
Leslie A Favier, Grant S Schulert
Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity...
2016: Application of Clinical Genetics
Haruka Oki, Ryota Kawasaki, Koji Sugimoto
A 79-year-old woman with a complaint of persistent upper abdominal pain was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of thrombosed acute type B aortic dissection. Computed tomography showed the complete static occlusion of the celiac artery. Because of progressive symptom with elevation of liver enzymes and metabolic acidosis 11 h after admission, endovascular revascularization was attempted on an emergent basis. After a failed catheterization of the celiac ostium in an antegrade fashion due to a hard occlusion, we succeeded in a retrograde recanalization through the pancreaticoduodenal arcade via the superior mesenteric artery with stent placement using a pull-through technique...
June 2, 2016: Acta Chirurgica Belgica
Eleonora Giannetti, Annamaria Staiano
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review was to summarize the evidence regarding probiotics treatment for pediatric IBS. RECENT FINDINGS: The overall management of children with IBS should be tailored to the patient's specific symptoms and identifiable triggers. The four major therapeutic approaches include: pharmacologic, dietary, psychosocial, and complementary/alternative medicine interventions.Although there is limited evidence for efficacy of pharmacological therapies such as antispasmodics and anti-diarrheals, these may have a role in severe cases...
July 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Eugenio L C Miller, Luiz F F Miller, Jorge G Carvalho, Alexandre Marsillac, Lucas Pires, Marcio A Babinski, Mauro Monteiro
INTRODUCTION: Psoas abscess is a rare clinical entity with vague symptomatology. We report a psoas abscess that simulated symptoms of acute appendicitis. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A twenty-five year old male presented pain irradiating to the right iliac fossa and lumbar region associated with thigh flexion. Laboratorial exams revealed leukocytosis with a neutrophil shift to the left. Abdominal Ultrasound showed significant intestinal distension and a small quantity of free fluid at the right iliac fossa...
2016: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Amy K Poupore, Miloslawa Stem, Daniela Molena, Anne O Lidor
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to ascertain the incidence of, reasons for, and risk factors associated with hospital readmission after an operation for benign distal esophageal disease. METHODS: Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2012-2014), patients with a primary diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease, paraesophageal hiatal hernia, or achalasia who underwent fundoplication, paraesophageal hernia repair, or Heller myotomy were identified...
September 2016: Surgery
Marco Antonio Avila-Vergara, Alma Rita Peña-Ayón, Luis Enrique Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Jesús Everardo Valenzuela-Verduzco, Carmen Beatriz Caballero-Rodríguez, Felipe Vadillo-Ortega
BACKGROUND: Ovarian pregnancy (OP) is a low-frequency pathology but with devastating effects on women reproductive health. It is often difficult to distinguish from tubal or abdominal pregnancy. Diagnostic procedures and actual medical approaches to the treatment of OP are still a challenge. CLINICAL CASE: In this paper we present a 21 years old woman, seen at the Hospital as emergency abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock, with a pregnancy of 14 weeks of gestational age...
November 2015: Ginecología y Obstetricia de México
Stephanie J Doniger, Aaron Kornblith
OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is as accurate as radiology-performed ultrasound in evaluating children with clinical concern for appendicitis. As part of a staged approach, we further hypothesized that POCUS could ultimately decrease computed tomography (CT) utilization. METHODS: This was a prospective, convenience sampling of patients aged 2 to 18 years presenting with abdominal pain to a pediatric emergency department. Those patients with prior abdominal imaging, pregnant, or unable to tolerate the examination were excluded...
June 14, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Yuhamy Curbelo-Peña, Juan Dardano-Berriel, Xavier Guedes-De la Puente, Maria Saladich-Cubero, Tomas Stickar, Enric De Caralt-Mestres
Mekel's diverticulum is a gastrointestinal malformation. Occurs in one of every 40 patients. It is usually asymptomatic whereas complications can be developed in 2% to 4%. The report is based on a 41-year old male, who attended to emergency, complaining of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Blood tests showed high level of inflammatory markers. With acute appendicitis as presumptive diagnosis, laparoscopy was performed. The intraoperative findings were: a perforated Mekel's diverticulum with normal cecal appendix...
October 2016: Journal of Minimal Access Surgery
Kyle D Lewis, Katrin Y Takenaka, Samuel D Luber
Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients...
May 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
David J Carlberg, Stephen D Lee, Jeffrey S Dubin
Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids...
May 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
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