Read by QxMD icon Read


Jiunn-Wei Wang, Chien-Ning Hsu, Wei-Chen Tai, Ming-Kun Ku, Tsung-Hsing Hung, Kuo-Lun Tseng, Lan-Ting Yuan, Seng-Howe Nguang, Chih-Ming Liang, Shih-Cheng Yang, Cheng-Kun Wu, Pin-I Hsu, Deng-Chyang Wu, Seng-Kee Chuah
The association of Helicobacter pylori eradication with the occurrence of renal dysfunction in patients with peptic ulcer diseases is still unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relevance of H. pylori eradication to the occurrence of chronic kidney diseases in patients with peptic ulcer diseases. Data that were available from 2000-2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, and all patients with peptic ulcer diseases (n = 208 196) were screened for eligibility. We divided randomly selected patients into an H...
2016: PloS One
Christian Quinet, Guy Czaplicki, Elise Dion, Fabiana Dal Pozzo, Anke Kurz, Claude Saegerman
BACKGROUND: Infection due to bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is endemic in most cattle-producing countries throughout the world. The key elements of a BVDV control programme are biosecurity, elimination of persistently infected animals and surveillance. Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is a notifiable disease in Belgium and an official eradication programme started from January 2015, based on testing ear notches sampled during the official identification and registration of calves at birth...
2016: PloS One
James J Cody, Wannaporn Ittiprasert, André N Miller, Lucie Henein, Margaret M Mentink-Kane, Michael H Hsieh
Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Racquel Domingo-Gonzalez, Oliver Prince, Andrea Cooper, Shabaana A Khader
Chemokines and cytokines are critical for initiating and coordinating the organized and sequential recruitment and activation of cells into Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Correct mononuclear cellular recruitment and localization are essential to ensure control of bacterial growth without the development of diffuse and damaging granulocytic inflammation. An important block to our understanding of TB pathogenesis lies in dissecting the critical aspects of the cytokine/chemokine interplay in light of the conditional role these molecules play throughout infection and disease development...
October 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Anup Arumughan, Yvette Roske, Carolin Barth, Laura Lleras Forero, Kenny Bravo-Rodriguez, Alexandra Redel, Simona Kostova, Erik McShane, Robert Opitz, Katja Faelber, Kirstin Rau, Thorsten Mielke, Oliver Daumke, Matthias Selbach, Elsa Sanchez-Garcia, Oliver Rocks, Daniela Panáková, Udo Heinemann, Erich E Wanker
Interaction mapping is a powerful strategy to elucidate the biological function of protein assemblies and their regulators. Here, we report the generation of a quantitative interaction network, directly linking 14 human proteins to the AAA+ ATPase p97, an essential hexameric protein with multiple cellular functions. We show that the high-affinity interacting protein ASPL efficiently promotes p97 hexamer disassembly, resulting in the formation of stable p97:ASPL heterotetramers. High-resolution structural and biochemical studies indicate that an extended UBX domain (eUBX) in ASPL is critical for p97 hexamer disassembly and facilitates the assembly of p97:ASPL heterotetramers...
October 20, 2016: Nature Communications
Alessandra Bandera, Elisa Colella, Giuliano Rizzardini, Andrea Gori, Mario Clerici
Antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection reduces, but does not eliminate, viral replication and down modulates immune activation. The persistence of low level HIV replication in the host, nevertheless, drives a smouldering degree of immune activation that is observed throughout the natural history of disease and is the main driving force sustaining morbidity and mortality. Areas covered: Early start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and intensive management of behavioural risk factors are possible but, at best, marginally successful ways to manage immune activation...
October 20, 2016: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Chien-Ying Lee, Hung-Che Shih, Min-Chien Yu, Ming-Yung Lee, Ya-Lan Chang, Ya-Yun Lai, Yi-Ching Lee, Yu-Hsiang Kuan, Chun-Che Lin
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether three strains of probiotics, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, and L. sporogenes, had significant inhibitive effects on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: This is a 4-week, randomly assigned, parallel-group, doubled-blind, and placebo-controlled study. Fifty patients with a positive H. pylori infection urea breath test (ΔUBT) result > 10% and without ulcer symptoms were randomized into a treatment group and a placebo group by a computer generated allocation sheet with 1:1...
October 19, 2016: Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine
Yushu Yin, Georgia Papavasiliou, Olga Y Zaborina, John C Alverdy, Fouad Teymour
The human gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization of multidrug resistant pathogens and the major source of life-threatening complications in critically ill and immunocompromised patients. Eradication measures using antibiotics carry further risk of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment can adversely shift the intestinal microbiome toward domination by resistant pathogens. Therefore, approaches directed to prevent replacement of health promoting microbiota with resistant pathogens should be developed...
October 19, 2016: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Jessalyn M Ubellacker, Sandra S McAllister
Systemic factors including cytokines, cell-free nucleic acids, microvesicles, and platelets are appreciated as important regulators of adenocarcinoma progression. Research findings using pre-clinical mouse models have revealed that many such systemically acting factors are either secreted by or responsive to peripheral tumors and impact bone and bone marrow (collectively referred to as the bone microenvironment) to initiate processes that ultimately govern disease progression, even in the absence of detectable bone metastases...
September 2016: Journal of Bone Oncology
Jennifer L Smith, Corey L Anderson, Don E Burgess, Claude S Elayi, Craig T January, Brian P Delisle
The molecular mechanisms underlying congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) are now beginning to be understood. New insights into the etiology and therapeutic strategies are emerging from heterologous expression studies of LQTS-linked mutant proteins, as well as inducible pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) from LQTS patients. This review focuses on the major molecular mechanism that underlies LQTS type 2 (LQT2). LQT2 is caused by loss of function (LOF) mutations in KCNH2 (also known as the human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene or hERG)...
October 2016: Journal of Arrhythmia
Takaki Yoshikawa, Tsutomu Sato, Takanobu Yamada, Toru Aoyama, Takashi Ogata, Haruhiko Cho
Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate residual micro-metastatic tumor cells existing at distant sites outside the surgical field. The current standard adjuvant chemotherapy is S-1 for 1 year or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for 6 months after D2 gastrectomy. However, there are some rooms in the overall survival of Stage III. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC)is a promising approach that combines intensive chemotherapy with high compliance; however, it is under development in Japan. Two JCOG phase II trials suggested that NAC was effective for bulky nodal disease...
October 2016: Gan to Kagaku Ryoho. Cancer & Chemotherapy
Cheryl K Zogg, Fernando Payró Chew, John W Scott, Lindsey L Wolf, Thomas C Tsai, Peter Najjar, Olubode A Olufajo, Eric B Schneider, Elliott R Haut, Adil H Haider, Joseph K Canner
Importance: Trauma is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults, who are also among the most likely to be uninsured. Efforts to increase insurance coverage, including passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), were intended to improve access to care and promote improvements in outcomes. However, despite reported gains in coverage, the ACA's success in promoting use of high-quality care and enacting changes in clinical end points remains unclear...
October 19, 2016: JAMA Surgery
Paulina J Paszkiewicz, Simon P Fräßle, Shivani Srivastava, Daniel Sommermeyer, Michael Hudecek, Ingo Drexler, Michel Sadelain, Lingfeng Liu, Michael C Jensen, Stanley R Riddell, Dirk H Busch
The adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is effective for treating human B cell malignancies. However, the persistence of functional CD19 CAR T cells causes sustained depletion of endogenous CD19+ B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to ablate transferred T cells after tumor eradication is complete to allow recovery of normal B cells. Previously, we developed a truncated version of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRt) that is coexpressed with the CAR on the T cell surface...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Laleh Mahmoudi, Shohreh Farshad, Mehrdad Seddigh, Paria Mahmoudi, Fardad Ejtehadi, Ramin Niknam
BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common gastric pathogen which is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. It has worldwide distribution with higher incidence in developing countries. Gemifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic with documented in vitro activity against H pylori. Considering that there is no clinical data to verify gemifloxacin efficacy in H pylori eradication, this pilot clinical trial was designed. METHODS: This prospective pilot study was performed during February 2014 to February 2015...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
N M Scott, J F Lauzon-Joset, A C Jones, K T Mincham, N M Troy, J Leffler, M Serralha, S L Prescott, S A Robertson, C Pasquali, A Bosco, P G Holt, D H Strickland
Infection-associated inflammatory stress during pregnancy is the most common cause of fetal growth restriction and/or miscarriage. Treatment strategies for protection of at-risk mothers are limited to a narrow range of vaccines, which do not cover the bulk of the common pathogens most frequently encountered. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that oral treatment during pregnancy with a microbial-derived immunomodulator (OM85), currently used clinically for attenuation of infection-associated airway inflammatory symptoms in infants-adults, markedly reduces risk for fetal loss/growth restriction resulting from maternal challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide or influenza...
October 19, 2016: Mucosal Immunology
(no author information available yet)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common Gram-negative bacterium associated with nosocomial and life-threatening chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is well-known for its ability to attach to surfaces of indwelling medical devices to form biofilms, which consist of a regular array of extracellular polymers. Tenaciously bound to the surface of devices and inherently resilient to antibiotic treatment, P. aeruginosa poses a serious threat in clinical medicine and contributes to the persistence of chronic infections...
October 19, 2016: Current Drug Targets
Adolfo Paolin, Diletta Trojan, Antonio Carniato, Fabio Tasca, Ervino Massarin, Alessandro Tugnoli, Elisa Cogliati
Bacterial contamination of tissues retrieved from cadaveric donors is a common feature worldwide, and every tissue bank, albeit using different methods, conducts decontamination to guarantee safe tissues suitable for clinical use. The effectiveness of the methods used to eradicate pathogens differs. In order to reduce the tissue bioburden at retrieval, we have introduced a new method involving rinsing tissues in a sodium hypochlorite solution. To test its effectiveness we analyzed two comparable groups of tissues: Group A: 1881 tissues, all rinsed with isotonic saline solution after retrieval, and Group B: 1968 tissues immersed in an isotonic saline solution containing sodium hypochlorite (final concentration 0...
October 18, 2016: Cell and Tissue Banking
Héloïse M Delagrèverie, Constance Delaugerre, Sharon R Lewin, Steven G Deeks, Jonathan Z Li
In chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, long-lived latently infected cells are the major barrier to virus eradication and functional cure. Several therapeutic strategies to perturb, eliminate, and/or control this reservoir are now being pursued in the clinic. These strategies include latency reversal agents (LRAs) designed to reactivate HIV-1 ribonucleic acid transcription and virus production and a variety of immune-modifying drugs designed to reverse latency, block homeostatic proliferation, and replenish the viral reservoir, eliminate virus-producing cells, and/or control HIV replication after cessation of antiretroviral therapy...
October 2016: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
Vanaja Konduri, Dali Li, Matthew M Halpert, Dan Liang, Zhengdong Liang, Yunyu Chen, William E Fisher, Silke Paust, Jonathan M Levitt, Qizhi Cathy Yao, William K Decker
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, exhibiting a five-year overall survival (OS) of only 7% despite aggressive standard of care. Recent advances in immunotherapy suggest potential application of immune-based treatment approaches to PDAC. To explore this concept further, we treated orthotopically established K-ras(G12D)/p53(-/-) PDAC tumors with gemcitabine and a cell-based vaccine previously shown to generate durable cell-mediated (TH1) immunity...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Qiong Liu, Wen Wen, Liang Tang, Chen-Jie Qin, Yan Lin, Hui-Lu Zhang, Han Wu, Charles Ashton, Hong-Ping Wu, Jin Ding, Wei Dong, Le-Xing Yu, Wen Yang, Dan-Dan Huang, Meng-Chao Wu, Hong-Yang Wang, He-Xin Yan
Despite their central function in tumor immunity, dendritic cells (DCs) can respond to inhibitory signals and become tolerogenic, curtailing T cell responses in vivo. Here, we provide the evidence for an inhibitory function of signal regulatory protein (SIRP) α in DC survival and activation. In tumors from human liver cancer patients, infiltrative DCs expressed elevated levels of SIRPα, which is correlated with the induction of immune tolerance within the tumors. Silencing of SIRPα resulted in a significant increase in the longevity of antigen-pulsed DCs in the draining lymph nodes...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"