keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Small animal

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545161/classic-galactosemia-study-on-the-late-prenatal-development-of-galt-specific-activity-in-a-sheep-model
#1
Ana I Coelho, Jörgen Bierau, Martijn Lindhout, Jelle Achten, Boris W Kramer, M Estela Rubio-Gozalbo
BACKGROUND: Classic galactosemia results from deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), a key enzyme of galactose metabolism. Despite early diagnosis and early postnatal therapeutic intervention, patients still develop neurologic and fertility impairments. Prenatal developmental toxicity has been hypothesized as a determinant factor of disease. In order to shed light on the importance of prenatal GALT activity, several studies have examined GALT activity throughout development...
May 25, 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545092/are-thermal-barriers-higher-in-deep-sea-turtle-nests
#2
Pilar Santidrián Tomillo, Luis Fonseca, Frank V Paladino, James R Spotila, Daniel Oro
Thermal tolerances are affected by the range of temperatures that species encounter in their habitat. Daniel Janzen hypothesized in his "Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics" that temperature gradients were effective barriers to animal movements where climatic uniformity was high. Sea turtles bury their eggs providing some thermal stability that varies with depth. We assessed the relationship between thermal uniformity and thermal tolerance in nests of three species of sea turtles. We considered that barriers were "high" when small thermal changes had comparatively large effects and "low" when the effects were small...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545068/automatically-tracking-neurons-in-a-moving-and-deforming-brain
#3
Jeffrey P Nguyen, Ashley N Linder, George S Plummer, Joshua W Shaevitz, Andrew M Leifer
Advances in optical neuroimaging techniques now allow neural activity to be recorded with cellular resolution in awake and behaving animals. Brain motion in these recordings pose a unique challenge. The location of individual neurons must be tracked in 3D over time to accurately extract single neuron activity traces. Recordings from small invertebrates like C. elegans are especially challenging because they undergo very large brain motion and deformation during animal movement. Here we present an automated computer vision pipeline to reliably track populations of neurons with single neuron resolution in the brain of a freely moving C...
May 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545054/an-optimized-small-animal-tumour-model-for-experimentation-with-low-energy-protons
#4
Elke Beyreuther, Kerstin Brüchner, Mechthild Krause, Margret Schmidt, Rita Szabo, Jörg Pawelke
BACKGROUND: The long-term aim of developing laser based particle acceleration towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short and ultra-intensive particle beam pulses. After comprehensive cell studies a mouse ear tumour model was established allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~20 MeV) currently available at laser driven accelerators. The model was successfully applied for a first tumour growth delay study with laser driven electrons, whereby the need of improvements crop out...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545034/characterization-of-sudan-ebolavirus-infection-in-ferrets
#5
Andrea Kroeker, Shihua He, Marc-Antoine de La Vega, Gary Wong, Carissa Embury-Hyatt, Xiangguo Qiu
Sudan virus (SUDV) outbreaks in Africa are highly lethal; however, the development and testing of novel antivirals and vaccines for this virus has been limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Non-human primates (NHP) remain the gold standard for modeling filovirus disease, but they are not conducive to screening large numbers of experimental compounds and should only be used to test the most promising candidates. Therefore, other smaller animal models are a valuable asset. We have recently developed a guinea-pig adapted SUDV virus that is lethal in guinea pigs...
May 8, 2017: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544957/zebrafish-as-a-visual-and-dynamic-model-to-study-the-transport-of-nanosized-drug-delivery-systems-across-the-biological-barriers
#6
Ye Li, Xiaoqing Miao, Tongkai Chen, Xiang Yi, Ruibing Wang, Haitao Zhao, Simon Ming-Yuen Lee, Xueqing Wang, Ying Zheng
With the wide application of nanotechnology to drug delivery systems, a simple, dynamic and visual in vivo model for high-throughput screening of novel formulations with fluorescence markers across biological barriers is desperately needed. In vitro cell culture models have been widely used, although they are far from a complimentary in vivo system. Mammalian animal models are common predictive models to study transport, but they are costly and time consuming. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small vertebrate model, have the potential to be developed as an "intermediate" model for quick evaluations...
May 10, 2017: Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544650/diverse-application-of-mri-for-mouse-phenotyping
#7
REVIEW
Yijen L Wu, Cecilia W Lo
Small animal models, particularly mouse models, of human diseases are becoming an indispensable tool for biomedical research. Studies in animal models have provided important insights into the etiology of diseases and accelerated the development of therapeutic strategies. Detailed phenotypic characterization is essential, both for the development of such animal models and mechanistic studies into disease pathogenesis and testing the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. MRI is a versatile and noninvasive imaging modality with excellent penetration depth, tissue coverage, and soft tissue contrast...
May 22, 2017: Birth Defects Res
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544542/conditional-macrophage-depletion-increases-inflammation-and-does-not-inhibit-the-development-of-osteoarthritis-in-obese-mafia-mice
#8
Chia-Lung Wu, Jenna McNeill, Kelsey Goon, Dianne Little, Kelly Kimmerling, Janet Huebner, Virginia Kraus, Farshid Guilak
OBJECTIVE: Macrophages are believed to play a critical role in the inflammation associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA) in obesity. The objective of the study was to investigate whether short-term, systemic depletion of macrophages would mitigate OA following injury in obese mice. METHODS: CSF-1R-GFP(+) Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis (MaFIA) transgenic mice that allow conditional depletion of macrophages were placed on a high-fat diet and underwent surgery to induce knee OA...
May 23, 2017: Arthritis & Rheumatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544323/mass-spectrometric-evidence-for-the-modification-of-small-molecules-in-a-cobalt-60-irradiated-rodent-diet
#9
J K Prasain, L S Wilson, A Arabshahi, C Grubbs, S Barnes
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation on the content of animal diet constituents using global metabolomics. Aqueous methanolic extracts of control and cobalt-60 irradiated NIH 7001 diets were comprehensively analyzed using nanoLC-MS/MS. Among the over two thousand ions revealed by XCMS followed by data preprocessing, 94 positive and 143 negative metabolite ions had greater than 1.5 fold changes and p-values <0.01. Use of Metaboanalyst statistical software demonstrated complete separation of the irradiated and non-radiated diets in unsupervised principal components analysis and supervised partial least squares discriminant analysis...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Mass Spectrometry: JMS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543438/humanized-mice-a-brief-overview-on-their-diverse-applications-in-biomedical-research
#10
REVIEW
Shigeyoshi Fujiwara
Model animals naturally differ from humans in various respects and results from the former are not directly translatable to the latter. One approach to address this issue is humanized mice that are defined as mice engrafted with functional human cells or tissues. In humanized mice, we can investigate the development and function of human cells or tissues (including their products encoded by human genes) in the in vivo context of a small animal. As such, humanized mouse models have played important roles that cannot be substituted by other animal models in various areas of biomedical research...
May 20, 2017: Journal of Cellular Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543171/phenolic-compounds-and-antioxidant-properties-of-arabinoxylan-hydrolyzates-from-defatted-rice-bran
#11
Prachit Yuwang, Ira Sulaeva, Ute Henniges, Stefan Böhmdorfer, Thomas Rosenau, Benjamart Chitsomboon, Sunanta Tongta
BACKGROUND: The water unextractable arabinoxylans (WUAX) contain beneficial phenolic compounds that can be used for food rather than for animal feed. The antioxidant activities of defatted rice bran obtained by xylanase-aided extraction is reported herein. The chemical and molecular characteristics of extracted fractions were investigated. RESULTS: The WUAX hydrolyzate precipitated by 0-60% ethanol (F60), 60-90% ethanol (F6090), and more than 90% ethanol (F90) had the decreased molar masses with increasing ethanol concentration...
May 25, 2017: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542878/foot-shape-in-arboreal-birds-two-morphological-patterns-for-the-same-pincer-like-tool
#12
Anick Abourachid, Anne-Claire Fabre, Raphaël Cornette, Elizabeth Höfling
The feet are the only contact between the body and the substrate in limbed animals and as such they provide a crucial interface between the animal and its environment. This is especially true for bipedal and arboreal species living in a complex three-dimensional environment that likely induces strong selection on foot morphology. In birds, foot morphology is highly variable, with different orientations of the toes, making it a good model for the study of the role of functional, developmental, and phylogenetic constraints in the evolution of phenotypic diversity...
May 23, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542839/how-whales-used-to-filter-exceptionally-preserved-baleen-in-a-miocene-cetotheriid
#13
Felix G Marx, Alberto Collareta, Anna Gioncada, Klaas Post, Olivier Lambert, Elena Bonaccorsi, Mario Urbina, Giovanni Bianucci
Baleen is a comb-like structure that enables mysticete whales to bulk feed on vast quantities of small prey, and ultimately allowed them to become the largest animals on Earth. Because baleen rarely fossilises, extremely little is known about its evolution, structure and function outside the living families. Here we describe, for the first time, the exceptionally preserved baleen apparatus of an entirely extinct mysticete morphotype: the Late Miocene cetotheriid, Piscobalaena nana, from the Pisco Formation of Peru...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540669/tropical-enteropathies
#14
REVIEW
John Louis-Auguste, Paul Kelly
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'tropical enteropathy' originated in observations in the 1960s that small intestinal morphology and function differed in the tropics from the norms found in temperate climates. It was subsequently shown that this enteropathy is more closely related to environmental conditions than latitude, and it was re-labelled 'environmental enteropathy'. It is now recognised that environmental enteropathy (also now called environmental enteric dysfunction) has implications for the health and linear growth of children in low- and middle-income countries, and it may underlie poor responses to oral vaccination in these countries...
July 2017: Current Gastroenterology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540488/an-18s-rrna-workflow-for-characterizing-protists-in-sewage-with-a-focus-on-zoonotic-trichomonads
#15
Julia M Maritz, Krysta H Rogers, Tara M Rock, Nicole Liu, Susan Joseph, Kirkwood M Land, Jane M Carlton
Microbial eukaryotes (protists) are important components of terrestrial and aquatic environments, as well as animal and human microbiomes. Their relationships with metazoa range from mutualistic to parasitic and zoonotic (i.e., transmissible between humans and animals). Despite their ecological importance, our knowledge of protists in urban environments lags behind that of bacteria, largely due to a lack of experimentally validated high-throughput protocols that produce accurate estimates of protist diversity while minimizing non-protist DNA representation...
May 24, 2017: Microbial Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539653/a-second-mortuary-hiatus-on-lake-baikal-in-siberia-and-the-arrival-of-small-scale-pastoralism
#16
Robert J Losey, Andrea L Waters-Rist, Tatiana Nomokonova, Artur A Kharinskii
The spread of pastoralism in Asia is poorly understood, including how such processes affected northern forager populations. Lake Baikal's western shore has a rich Holocene archaeological record that tracks these processes. The Early Bronze Age here is evidenced by numerous forager burials. The Early Iron Age (EIA) is thought to mark the arrival of pastoralists, but archaeological remains from this period have received little analysis. New radiocarbon dates for EIA human remains from 23 cemeteries indicate that no burials were created along this shore for ~900 years...
May 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539440/uncovering-the-repertoire-of-endogenous-flaviviral-elements-in-aedes-mosquito-genomes
#17
Yasutsugu Suzuki, Lionel Frangeul, Laura B Dickson, Hervé Blanc, Yann Verdier, Joelle Vinh, Louis Lambrechts, Maria-Carla Saleh
Endogenous viral elements derived from non-retroviral RNA viruses were described in various animal genomes. Whether they have a biological function such as host immune protection against related viruses is a field of intense study. Here, we investigated the repertoire of endogenous flaviviral elements (EFVEs) in Aedes mosquitoes, the vectors of arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya viruses. Previous studies identified three EFVEs from Ae. albopictus and one from Ae. aegypti cell lines. However, in-depth characterization of EFVEs in wild-type mosquito populations and individuals in vivo has not been performed...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539417/exposure-to-stressors-facilitates-long-term-synaptic-potentiation-in-the-lateral-habenula
#18
Hoyong Park, Jeehae Rhee, Kwanghoon Park, Jung-Soo Han, Roberto Malinow, ChiHye Chung
The lateral habenula (LHb) is a small part of the epithalamus that projects to monoamine centers in the brain. Previously, neurotransmission onto the LHb was shown to be abnormally potentiated in animal models of depression. However, synaptic plasticity in this brain area and the effect of stressor exposure on synaptic plasticity of the LHb have not been investigated. Thus, we explored whether the LHb undergoes dynamic changes in synaptic efficacy or not. First, we observed that a moderate long-term potentiation (LTP) occurs in a fraction of LHb neurons obtained from naïve Sprague Dawley rats...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538678/effects-of-commercial-apple-varieties-on-human-gut-microbiota-composition-and-metabolic-output-using-an-in-vitro-colonic-model
#19
Athanasios Koutsos, Maria Lima, Lorenza Conterno, Mattia Gasperotti, Martina Bianchi, Francesca Fava, Urska Vrhovsek, Julie A Lovegrove, Kieran M Tuohy
Apples are a rich source of polyphenols and fiber. A major proportion of apple polyphenols escape absorption in the small intestine and together with non-digestible polysaccharides reach the colon, where they can serve as substrates for bacterial fermentation. Animal studies suggest a synergistic interaction between apple polyphenols and the soluble fiber pectin; however, the effects of whole apples on human gut microbiota are less extensively studied. Three commercial apple varieties-Renetta Canada, Golden Delicious and Pink Lady-were digested and fermented in vitro using a batch culture colonic model (pH 5...
May 24, 2017: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538012/antiphospholipid-syndrome-an-update-for-clinicians-and-scientists
#20
Andrew P Vreede, Paula L Bockenstedt, Jason S Knight
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a leading acquired cause of thrombosis and pregnancy loss. Upon diagnosis (which is unlikely to be made until at least one morbid event has occurred), anticoagulant medications are typically prescribed in an attempt to prevent future events. This approach is not uniformly effective and does not prevent associated autoimmune and inflammatory complications. The goal of this review is to update clinicians and scientists on mechanistic and clinically relevant studies from the past 18 months, which have especially focused on inflammatory aspects of APS pathophysiology...
May 22, 2017: Current Opinion in Rheumatology
keyword
keyword
6994
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"