Read by QxMD icon Read

mucosal barrier injury

A Tassopoulos, A Chalkias, A Papalois, N Iacovidou, T Xanthos
The intestine is highly sensitive to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Intestinal I/R may cause local tissue injury and disruption of the intestinal mucosal barrier, allowing the passage of viable bacteria and endotoxins from the gastrointestinal lumen to distant organs. This phenomenon, known as bacterial translocation (BT), may lead to systemic disorders with high morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress mediators such as reactive oxygen species, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and nitric oxide are believed to contribute to the intestinal I/R injury...
October 13, 2016: Redox Report: Communications in Free Radical Research
G Marelli, C Belgiovine, A Mantovani, M Erreni, P Allavena
Mucosal immunity at the intestinal level is constantly challenged by the presence of external food and microbial antigens and must be kept under strict control to avoid the rise of aberrant inflammation. Among cells of the innate immunity, macrophages expressing the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 are strategically located near the gut epithelial barrier. These cells contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis by producing the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10; however, their role in the control of full blown inflammation and tissue injury is controversial...
August 2, 2016: Immunobiology
Ross N Butler, Margaret Kosek, Nancy F Krebs, Cornelia U Loechl, Alexander Loy, Victor O Owino, Michael B Zimmermann, Douglas J Morrison
The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical meeting on environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) in Vienna (28-30 October 2015; to bring together international experts in the fields of EED, nutrition and stable isotope technologies. Advances in stable isotope labelling techniques open up new possibilities to improve our understanding of gastrointestinal dysfunction and the role of the microbiota in host health. In the context of EED, little is known about the role gut dysfunction may play in macro- and micronutrient bioavailability and requirements and what the consequences may be for nutritional status and linear growth...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Maya Dahan, Shauna O'Donnell, Julie Hebert, Milagros Gonzales, Bonita Lee, A Uma Chandran, Samantha Woolsey, Sandra Escoredo, Heather Chinnery, Caroline Quach
OBJECTIVE Central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. We aimed to determine whether intra-abdominal pathologies are an independent risk factor for CLABSI. METHODS We performed a retrospective matched case-control study of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of the Montreal Children's Hospital (Montreal) and the Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Canada. CLABSI cases that occurred between April 2009 and March 2014 were identified through local infection control databases...
September 9, 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Kang Li, Luobu Gesang, Zeng Dan, Lamu Gusang
The molecular mechanisms for hypoxic environment causing the injury of intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB) are widely unknown. To address the issue, Han Chinese from 100 m altitude and Tibetans from high altitude (more than 3650 m) were recruited. Histological and transcriptome analyses were performed. The results showed intestinal villi were reduced and appeared irregular, and glandular epithelium was destroyed in the IMB of Tibetans when compared with Han Chinese. Transcriptome analysis revealed 2573 genes with altered expression...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
H Hof
BACKGROUND: Yeasts are found in urine specimens relatively often, especially in the elderly and patients under treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics, i. e. especially in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In some cases, the number of pathogens is very high, i. e. >10(5)/ml. The clinical relevance of detecting Candida in urine is difficult to assess. In the German S3 guidelines it is apodictically stated that an ascending infection of the urinary tract by yeasts does not occur but this may undoubtedly happen in certain instances in patients at risk, for example in the elderly, in diabetic persons and in the case of foreign bodies in the urinary tract...
September 2, 2016: Der Urologe. Ausg. A
Lufang Chen, Keying Xu, Qifeng Gui, Yue Chen, Deying Chen, Yunmei Yang
A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that the use of probiotics has the potential to prevent nosocomial infections. However, the mechanism underlying probiotic-induced anti-infection and sepsis remains to be investigated. In the present study, 200 µl/day of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or normal saline (control) was orally administrated to 4-week-old C57BL6 mice 4 weeks prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). A number of mice were sacrificed 24 h after CLP, and the remaining mice were used for survival studies...
September 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Xiaoliang Shu, Jian Zhang, Qingxiu Wang, Zengguang Xu, Tingting Yu
Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is a common clinical pathophysiological process that is common in severe trauma, major surgery, and in post-resuscitation. Glutamine (Gln) reduces intestinal IR injury, however, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) are mediators involved in the pathophysiology of intestinal IR injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Gln on the intestinal mucosa of HMGB1 expression following IR to determine whether Gln relieved intestinal IR injury in the intestinal mucosal barrier...
September 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Esmé van der Gracht, Sonja Zahner, Mitchell Kronenberg
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells...
2016: Mediators of Inflammation
Wenhong Deng, Ablikim Abliz, Sheng Xu, Rongze Sun, Wenyi Guo, Qiao Shi, Jia Yu, Weixing Wang
Recent studies demonstrated that apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, significantly decreased acute pancreatitis‑associated inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. In addition, apocynin was able to reduce ischemic reperfusion injury‑associated damage; however, the exact effects of apocynin on acute pancreatitis‑associated intestinal mucosal injury have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apocynin on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP)...
October 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Veronika Butin-Israeli, Madelyn C Houser, Mingli Feng, Edward B Thorp, Asma Nusrat, Charles A Parkos, Ronen Sumagin
Neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) is a hallmark of inflammatory mucosal disorders. PMN TEM is associated with epithelial injury; however, mechanisms involved in this process are not well defined. The current work describes a new mechanism whereby PMN deposition of membrane-derived microparticles (PMN-MPs) onto intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) during TEM leads to loss of epithelial cadherins, thus promoting epithelial injury and increased PMN recruitment. PMN-MPs secreted by activated PMNs during TEM displayed a high level of enzymatically active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and were capable of mediating potent effects on IEC integrity...
August 23, 2016: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Chao Yu, Shanjun Tan, Chunyu Zhou, Cuilin Zhu, Xin Kang, Shuai Liu, Shuang Zhao, Shulin Fan, Zhen Yu, Ai Peng, Zhen Wang
Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity...
August 9, 2016: Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Chao Yu, Zhen Wang, Shanjun Tan, Qiang Wang, Chunyu Zhou, Xin Kang, Shuang Zhao, Shuai Liu, Huijun Fu, Zhen Yu, Ai Peng
Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress...
2016: Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Borja Ocón, Carlos J Aranda, Reyes Gámez-Belmonte, María Dolores Suárez, Antonio Zarzuelo, Olga Martínez-Augustin, Fermín Sánchez de Medina
Glucocorticoids are widely used for the management of inflammatory bowel disease, albeit with known limitations for long-term use and relevant adverse effects. In turn, they have harmful effects in experimental colitis. We aimed to explore the mechanism and possible implications of this phenomenon. Regular and microbiota depleted C57BL/6 mice were exposed to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis and treated with budesonide. Colonic inflammation and animal status were compared. In vitro epithelial models of wound healing were used to confirm the effects of glucocorticoids...
September 15, 2016: Biochemical Pharmacology
Lei Yan, Chun-Rong Wu, Chen Wang, Chun-Hui Yang, Guang-Zhi Tong, Jian-Guo Tang
BACKGROUND: Inflammation is supposed to play a key role in the pathophysiological processes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI), and Candida albicans in human gut commonly elevates inflammatory cytokines in intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to explore the effect of C. albicans on IIRI. METHODS: Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the status of C. albicans infection and IIRI operation: group blank and sham; group blank and IIRI; group cefoperazone plus IIRI; group C...
July 20, 2016: Chinese Medical Journal
S S Seregin, N Golovchenko, B Schaf, J Chen, K A Eaton, G Y Chen
NLRP6 is a member of the Nod-like receptor family, whose members are involved in the recognition of microbes and/or tissue injury. NLRP6 was previously demonstrated to regulate the production of interleukin (IL)-18 and is important for protecting mice against chemically induced intestinal injury and colitis-associated colon cancer. However, the cellular mechanisms by which NLRP6 reduces susceptibility to colonic inflammation remain unclear. Here, we determined that NLRP6 expression is specifically upregulated in Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes that infiltrate into the colon during dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammation...
June 29, 2016: Mucosal Immunology
Gracie Vargas, Kathleen Listiak Vincent, Jingna Wei, Nigel Bourne, Massoud Motamedi
BACKGROUND: Concern regarding the effect of epithelial damage to the colorectal surface and possible impact on sexually transmitted infection transmission prompts the need for methods to evaluate the mucosal microscopic surface in preclinical studies examining such injury. This includes determining the effect of topical HIV prevention products on mucosal barrier integrity. In vivo imaging with high-resolution endomicroscopy could reveal defects in the mucosal barrier resulting from injury/surface trauma...
June 28, 2016: Journal of Microscopy
Krista A Power, Jenifer T Lu, Jennifer M Monk, Dion Lepp, Wenqing Wu, Claire Zhang, Ronghua Liu, Rong Tsao, Lindsay E Robinson, Geoffrey A Wood, David J Wolyn
SCOPE: This study investigated the effects of cooked whole asparagus versus its equivalent level of purified flavonoid glycoside, rutin, on dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis and subsequent colitis recovery in mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: C57BL/6 male mice were fed an AIN-93G basal diet (BD), or BD supplemented with 2% cooked asparagus (ASP) or 0.025% rutin (RUT) for 2 weeks prior to and during colitis induction with 2% DSS in water for 7 days, followed by 5 days colitis recovery...
June 28, 2016: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
S Martínez-Herrero, A Martínez
Adrenomedullin (AM) and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) are 2 biologically active peptides produced by the same gene, ADM, with ubiquitous distribution and many physiological functions. Adrenomedullin is composed of 52 amino acids, has an internal molecular ring composed by 6 amino acids and a disulfide bond, and shares structural similarities with calcitonin gene-related peptide, amylin, and intermedin. The AM receptor consists of a 7-transmembrane domain protein called calcitonin receptor-like receptor in combination with a single transmembrane domain protein known as receptor activity-modifying protein...
July 2016: Domestic Animal Endocrinology
Khalidur Rahman, Chirayu Desai, Smita S Iyer, Natalie E Thorn, Pradeep Kumar, Yunshan Liu, Tekla Smith, Andrew S Neish, Hongliang Li, Shiyun Tan, Pengbo Wu, Xiaoxiong Liu, Yuanjie Yu, Alton B Farris, Asma Nusrat, Charles A Parkos, Frank A Anania
BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is evidence from clinical studies that compromised intestinal epithelial permeability contributes to the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but the exact mechanisms are not clear. Mice with disruption of the gene (F11r) encoding junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) have defects in intestinal epithelial permeability. We used these mice to study how disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier contributes to NASH. METHODS: Male C57BL/6 (control) or F11r(-/-) mice were fed a normal diet or a diet high in saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (HFCD) for 8 weeks...
October 2016: Gastroenterology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"