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CRC AND MICROBIOTA

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29670137/a-systems-biology-approach-to-predict-and-characterize-human-gut-microbial-metabolites-in-colorectal-cancer
#1
QuanQiu Wang, Li Li, Rong Xu
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. It is estimated that about half the cases of CRC occurring today are preventable. Recent studies showed that human gut microbiota and their collective metabolic outputs play important roles in CRC. However, the mechanisms by which human gut microbial metabolites interact with host genetics in contributing CRC remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that computational approaches that integrate and analyze vast amounts of publicly available biomedical data have great potential in better understanding how human gut microbial metabolites are mechanistically involved in CRC...
April 18, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29657127/the-intestinal-microbiota-in-colorectal-cancer
#2
REVIEW
Herbert Tilg, Timon E Adolph, Romana R Gerner, Alexander R Moschen
Experimental evidence from the past years highlights a key role for the intestinal microbiota in inflammatory and malignant gastrointestinal diseases. Diet exhibits a strong impact on microbial composition and provides risk for developing colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Large metagenomic studies in human CRC associated microbiome signatures with the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, suggesting a fundamental role of the intestinal microbiota in the evolution of gastrointestinal malignancy. Basic science established a critical function for the intestinal microbiota in promoting tumorigenesis...
March 19, 2018: Cancer Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650970/crosstalk-between-gut-microbiota-and-sirtuin-3-in-colonic-inflammation-and-tumorigenesis
#3
Yong Zhang, Xiao-Lan Wang, Min Zhou, Chao Kang, He-Dong Lang, Meng-Ting Chen, Suo-Cheng Hui, Bin Wang, Man-Tian Mi
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease involving a variety of genetic and environmental factors. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) is expressed at a low level in cancer tissues of CRC, but it is unclear how Sirt3 modulates colonic tumorigenesis. In this study, we found that gut microbiota play a central role in the resistance to CRC tumor formation in wild-type (WT) mice through APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli)-mutant mouse microbiota transfer via Wnt signaling. We also found that Sirt3-deficient mice were hypersusceptible to colonic inflammation and tumor development through altered intestinal integrity and p38 signaling, respectively...
April 13, 2018: Experimental & Molecular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29642940/multi-cohort-analysis-of-colorectal-cancer-metagenome-identified-altered-bacteria-across-populations-and-universal-bacterial-markers
#4
Zhenwei Dai, Olabisi Oluwabukola Coker, Geicho Nakatsu, William K K Wu, Liuyang Zhao, Zigui Chen, Francis K L Chan, Karsten Kristiansen, Joseph J Y Sung, Sunny Hei Wong, Jun Yu
BACKGROUND: Alterations of gut microbiota are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in different populations and several bacterial species were found to contribute to the tumorigenesis. The potential use of gut microbes as markers for early diagnosis has also been reported. However, cohort specific noises may distort the structure of microbial dysbiosis in CRC and lead to inconsistent results among studies. In this regard, our study targeted at exploring changes in gut microbiota that are universal across populations at species level...
April 11, 2018: Microbiome
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29589305/molecular-analysis-of-the-microbiome-in-colorectal-cancer
#5
Fiona Clegg, Susan H Berry, Richard Hansen, Georgina L Hold
The human gut microbiota plays a major role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Many studies have attempted to define links between microbiota residents, their function and disease development. We now have incredible molecular tools to allow us to study the gut microbiome however in order to make best use of these sophisticated approaches we need to ensure that samples are collected and processed using standardized and reproducible protocols. Here we provide an overview of molecular analysis methods and describe protocols for collecting and processing clinical samples for subsequent microbiome analysis...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29573336/the-impact-of-klebsiella-pneumoniae-in-lower-gastrointestinal-tract-diseases
#6
REVIEW
Christina Parvinder Kaur, Jamuna Vadivelu, Samudi Chandramathi
The 2016 Global Burden of Disease report by WHO revealed that diseases of the gastrointestinal tract had one of the highest incidence rates worldwide. The plethora of factors that contribute to the development of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) related illnesses can be divided into genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors. Apart from that, the role that infectious agents play in the development of GIT diseases has piqued the interest of researchers worldwide. The human gut harbours approximately 101 to 1012 cfu/ml bacteria in it with increasing concentration towards the lower GIT...
March 24, 2018: Journal of Digestive Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29566903/the-gastrointestinal-microbiota-and-its-role-in-oncogenesis
#7
REVIEW
S Y Lam, J Yu, S H Wong, M P Peppelenbosch, G M Fuhler
Advances in research techniques have made it possible to map the microbial communities in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where the majority of bacteria in the human body reside. Disturbances in these communities are referred to as dysbiosis and have been associated with GI cancers. Although dysbiosis is observed in several GI malignancies, the specific role of these changes has not been understood to the extent of Helicobacter pylori (HP) in gastric cancer (GC). This review will address the bacterial communities along the GI tract, from the oral cavity to the anal canal, particularly focusing on bacterial dysbiosis and carcinogenesis...
December 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29566186/meat-and-fiber-intake-and-interaction-with-pattern-recognition-receptors-tlr1-tlr2-tlr4-and-tlr10-in-relation-to-colorectal-cancer-in-a-danish-prospective-case-cohort-study
#8
Tine Iskov Kopp, Ulla Vogel, Anne Tjonneland, Vibeke Andersen
Background: Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators. Objective: Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29543545/systematic-review-gut-microbiota-in-fecal-samples-and-detection-of-colorectal-neoplasms
#9
Efrat L Amitay, Agne Krilaviciute, Hermann Brenner
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. Dysbiosis in the gut microbiota may be associated with CRC. This systematic review focuses on differences in gut microbial community between people diagnosed with CRC or adenoma and healthy individuals using fecal samples, emphasizing non-invasive fecal microbiome models for CRC early diagnosis. Nineteen studies were identified in a systematic literature search of Pubmed, Web of Science and ScienceDirect. Several bacteria were reported to differ in abundance between CRC and adenoma cases and healthy controls, with Fusobacterium the most common...
March 15, 2018: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29517944/concurrent-gut-transcriptome-and-microbiota-profiling-following-chronic-ethanol-consumption-in-nonhuman-primates
#10
Tasha Barr, Suhas Sureshchandra, Paul Ruegger, Jingfei Zhang, Wenxiu Ma, James Borneman, Kathleen Grant, Ilhem Messaoudi
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) results in increased intestinal permeability, nutrient malabsorption, and increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these morbidities remains limited because studies to date have relied almost exclusively on short-term heavy/binge drinking rodent models and colonic biopsies/fecal samples collected from AUD subjects with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consequently, the dose- and site-dependent impact of chronic alcohol consumption in the absence of overt liver disease remains poorly understood...
March 8, 2018: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29479437/dysbiosis-of-gut-microbiota-in-promoting-the-development-of-colorectal-cancer
#11
REVIEW
Shaomin Zou, Lekun Fang, Mong-Hong Lee
Gastrointestinal microbiome, containing at least 100 trillion bacteria, resides in the mucosal surface of human intestine. Recent studies show that perturbations in the microbiota may influence physiology and link to a number of diseases, including colon tumorigenesis. Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer, is the disease resulting from multi-genes and multi-factors, but the mechanistic details between gut microenvironment and CRC remain poorly characterized. Thanks to new technologies such as metagenome sequencing, progress in large-scale analysis of the genetic and metabolic profile of gut microbial has been possible, which has facilitated studies about microbiota composition, taxonomic alterations and host interactions...
February 2018: Gastroenterology Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29462896/dietary-fiber-treatment-corrects-the-composition-of-gut-microbiota-promotes-scfa-production-and-suppresses-colon-carcinogenesis
#12
Faraz Bishehsari, Phillip A Engen, Nailliw Z Preite, Yunus E Tuncil, Ankur Naqib, Maliha Shaikh, Marco Rossi, Sherry Wilber, Stefan J Green, Bruce R Hamaker, Khashayarsha Khazaie, Robin M Voigt, Christopher B Forsyth, Ali Keshavarzian
Epidemiological studies propose a protective role for dietary fiber in colon cancer (CRC). One possible mechanism of fiber is its fermentation property in the gut and ability to change microbiota composition and function. Here, we investigate the role of a dietary fiber mixture in polyposis and elucidate potential mechanisms using TS4Cre×cAPCl °x468 mice. Stool microbiota profiling was performed, while functional prediction was done using PICRUSt. Stool short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) metabolites were measured...
February 16, 2018: Genes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29438479/novel-tn916-like-elements-confer-aminoglycoside-macrolide-co-resistance-in-clinical-isolates-of-streptococcus-gallolyticus-ssp-gallolyticus
#13
Stanimir Kambarev, Frédéric Pecorari, Stéphane Corvec
Background: Streptococcus gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus (Sgg) is a commensal bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen. In humans it has been clinically associated with the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and epidemiologically recognized as an emerging cause of infective endocarditis (IE). The standard therapy of Sgg includes the administration of a penicillin in combination with an aminoglycoside. Even though penicillin-resistant isolates have still not been reported, epidemiological studies have shown that this microbe is a reservoir of multiple acquired genes, conferring resistance to tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, macrolides and glycopeptides...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29437871/gut-microbiota-modulate-t-cell-trafficking-into-human-colorectal-cancer
#14
Eleonora Cremonesi, Valeria Governa, Jesus Francisco Glaus Garzon, Valentina Mele, Francesca Amicarella, Manuele Giuseppe Muraro, Emanuele Trella, Virginie Galati-Fournier, Daniel Oertli, Silvio Raffael Däster, Raoul A Droeser, Benjamin Weixler, Martin Bolli, Raffaele Rosso, Ulrich Nitsche, Nina Khanna, Adrian Egli, Simone Keck, Julia Slotta-Huspenina, Luigi M Terracciano, Paul Zajac, Giulio Cesare Spagnoli, Serenella Eppenberger-Castori, Klaus-Peter Janssen, Lubor Borsig, Giandomenica Iezzi
OBJECTIVE: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. DESIGN: Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues...
February 6, 2018: Gut
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29430336/influence-of-bile-acids-on-colorectal-cancer-risk-potential-mechanisms-mediated-by-diet-gut-microbiota-interactions
#15
Sören Ocvirk, Stephen Jd O'Keefe
Purpose of review: To review the evidence for the tumorigenic effects of food-stimulated bile acids on the colon and interaction with the gut microbiota. Recent Findings: High-fat diets promote the hepatic synthesis of bile acids and increase their delivery to the colonic lumen. Here, they stimulate the growth and activity of 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, which convert primary into secondary bile acids that show tumorigenic activity, especially deoxycholic acid (DCA)...
December 2017: Current Nutrition Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29422804/an-analysis-of-dietary-fiber-and-fecal-fiber-components-including-ph-in-rural-africans-with-colorectal-cancer
#16
Mohammed Faruk, Sani Ibrahim, Ahmed Adamu, Abdulmumini Hassan Rafindadi, Yahaya Ukwenya, Yawale Iliyasu, Abdullahi Adamu, Surajo Mohammed Aminu, Mohammed Sani Shehu, Danladi Amodu Ameh, Abdullahi Mohammed, Saad Aliyu Ahmed, John Idoko, Atara Ntekim, Aishatu Maude Suleiman, Khalid Zahir Shah, Kasimu Umar Adoke
Background/Aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now a major public health problem with heavy morbidity and mortality in rural Africans despite the lingering dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs consumption. Studies have shown that increased intake of dietary fiber which contribute to low fecal pH and also influences the activity of intestinal microbiota, is associated with a lowered risk for CRC. However, whether or not the apparent high dietary fiber consumption by Africans do not longer protects against CRC risk is unknown...
January 2018: Intestinal Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420293/patients-with-familial-adenomatous-polyposis-harbor-colonic-biofilms-containing-tumorigenic-bacteria
#17
Christine M Dejea, Payam Fathi, John M Craig, Annemarie Boleij, Rahwa Taddese, Abby L Geis, Xinqun Wu, Christina E DeStefano Shields, Elizabeth M Hechenbleikner, David L Huso, Robert A Anders, Francis M Giardiello, Elizabeth C Wick, Hao Wang, Shaoguang Wu, Drew M Pardoll, Franck Housseau, Cynthia L Sears
Individuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacterial biofilms composed predominately of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis Genes for colibactin ( clbB ) and Bacteroides fragilis toxin ( bft ), encoding secreted oncotoxins, were highly enriched in FAP patients' colonic mucosa compared to healthy individuals...
February 2, 2018: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420132/tumour-associated-and-non-tumour-associated-microbiota-addendum
#18
Burkhardt Flemer, Maeve Herlihy, Micheal O'Riordain, Fergus Shanahan, Paul W O'Toole
In a recent study1 we reported that tissue-associated microbial Co-abundance Groups (CAGs) were differentially associated with CRC. Two of the CAGs, which we named Pathogen CAG and Prevotella CAG, were correlated with a gene expression signature indicative of a TH17 response. A TH17 response has been associated with decreased survival in patients with CRC2, and members of the Pathogen CAG such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis have been repeatedly reported to be associated with CRC-development...
February 8, 2018: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29385712/colorectal-cancer-and-alcohol-consumption-populations-to-molecules
#19
REVIEW
Marco Rossi, Muhammad Jahanzaib Anwar, Ahmad Usman, Ali Keshavarzian, Faraz Bishehsari
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, being the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the world. Several environmental and habitual factors have been associated with the CRC risk. Alcohol intake, a common and rising habit of modern society, is one of the major risk factors for development of CRC. Here, we will summarize the evidence linking alcohol with colon carcinogenesis and possible underlying mechanisms. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that even moderate drinking increases the CRC risk...
January 30, 2018: Cancers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29331105/dietary-factors-modulate-colonic-tumorigenesis-through-the-interaction-of-gut-microbiota-and-host-chloride-channels
#20
Yong Zhang, Chao Kang, Xiao-Lan Wang, Min Zhou, Meng-Ting Chen, Xiao-Hui Zhu, Kai Liu, Bin Wang, Qian-Yong Zhang, Jun-Dong Zhu, Man-Tian Mi
SCOPE: In recent decades, the association among diet, gut microbiota, and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been established. Gut microbiota and associated metabolites, such as bile acids and butyrate, are now known to play a key role in CRC development. The aim of this study is to identify that the progression to CRC is influenced by cholic acid, sodium butyrate, a high-fat diet, or different dose of dihydromyricetin (DMY) interacted with gut microbiota. METHODS AND RESULTS: An AOM/DSS (azoxymethan/dextran sodium sulfate) model is established to study the gut microbiota compsition before and after tumor formation during colitis-induced tumorigenesis...
March 2018: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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