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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29679704/a-separable-two-dimensional-random-field-model-of-binary-response-data-from-multi-day-behavioral-experiments
#1
Noa Malem-Shinitski, Yingzhuo Zhang, Daniel T Gray, Sara N Burke, Anne C Smith, Carol A Barnes, Demba Ba
BACKGROUND: The study of learning in populations of subjects can provide insights into the changes that occur in the brain with aging, drug intervention, and psychiatric disease. NEW METHOD: We introduce a separable two-dimensional (2D) random field (RF) model for analyzing binary response data acquired during the learning of object-reward associations across multiple days. The method can quantify the variability of performance within a day and across days, and can capture abrupt changes in learning...
April 18, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672581/compositional-clustering-in-task-structure-learning
#2
Nicholas T Franklin, Michael J Frank
Humans are remarkably adept at generalizing knowledge between experiences in a way that can be difficult for computers. Often, this entails generalizing constituent pieces of experiences that do not fully overlap, but nonetheless share useful similarities with, previously acquired knowledge. However, it is often unclear how knowledge gained in one context should generalize to another. Previous computational models and data suggest that rather than learning about each individual context, humans build latent abstract structures and learn to link these structures to arbitrary contexts, facilitating generalization...
April 19, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29669266/the-strength-of-reward-related-learning-depends-on-the-degree-of-activation-of-ventral-tegmental-area-dopamine-neurons
#3
E Galaj, R Ranaldi
We tested whether (1) the capacity of a reward-associated conditioned stimulus (CS) to cause conditioned activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons is associated with its capacity to elicit conditioned approach responses and (2) whether the acquisition of these capacities by a CS requires N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor stimulation. Rats were trained to emit a conditioned approach response to a light CS that was previously paired with food and were treated systemically with scopolamine (a mACh receptor antagonist) or MK-801 a (NMDA receptor antagonist) either prior to each conditioning session (during which animals experienced paired CS and food presentations) or prior to the conditioned approach (CS-only)...
April 15, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29668390/planning-complexity-registers-as-a-cost-in-metacontrol
#4
Wouter Kool, Samuel J Gershman, Fiery A Cushman
Decision-making algorithms face a basic tradeoff between accuracy and effort (i.e., computational demands). It is widely agreed that humans can choose between multiple decision-making processes that embody different solutions to this tradeoff: Some are computationally cheap but inaccurate, whereas others are computationally expensive but accurate. Recent progress in understanding this tradeoff has been catalyzed by formalizing it in terms of model-free (i.e., habitual) versus model-based (i.e., planning) approaches to reinforcement learning...
April 18, 2018: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29665478/developing-an-obesity-intervention-in-micronesia-from-needs-assessment-to-planning
#5
Ann Futterman Collier, Suzanne Daiss, Everlynn Temengil, Samantha Cody Russell, Julia Caroline Miller, Fumiana M Renguul
Evidence-based obesity reduction programs in the Pacific are scarce to nonexistent. Using a community-based participatory research model (CBPR) we developed a collaboration between our university and a small Pacific Island nation. We established an advisory council of local stakeholders and then conducted an extensive needs assessment with youth, parents, professionals, and lay public. Only 9% of participants had tried a weight loss program. There was a strong tendency to engage in binge-eating cycles; difficulty eating healthy during frequent community celebrations with few healthy food options available in general; and limited traditions that involved physical activity...
April 5, 2018: Evaluation and Program Planning
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29663595/adult-neurogenesis-affects-motivation-to-obtain-weak-but-not-strong-reward-in-operant-tasks
#6
Rose-Marie Karlsson, Alice S Wang, Anup N Sonti, Heather A Cameron
Decreased motivation to seek rewards is a key feature of mood disorders that correlates with severity and treatment outcome. This anhedonia, or apathy, likely reflects impairment in reward circuitry, but the specific neuronal populations controlling motivation are unclear. Granule neurons generated in the adult hippocampus have been implicated in mood disorders, but are not generally considered as part of reward circuits. We investigated a possible role of these new neurons in motivation to work for food and sucrose rewards in operant conditioning tasks using GFAP-TK pharmacogenetic ablation of adult neurogenesis in both rats and mice...
April 16, 2018: Hippocampus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29661832/kinase-activity-in-the-olfactory-bulb-is-required-for-odor-memory-consolidation
#7
Michelle T Tong, Tae-Young P Kim, Thomas A Cleland
Long-term fear memory formation in the hippocampus and neocortex depends upon brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling after acquisition. Incremental, appetitive odor discrimination learning is thought to depend substantially on the differentiation of adult-born neurons within the olfactory bulb (OB)-a process that is closely associated with BDNF signaling. We sought to elucidate the role of neurotrophin signaling within the OB on odor memory consolidation. Male mice were trained on odor-reward associative discriminations after bilateral infusion of the kinase inhibitor K252a, or vehicle control, into the OB...
May 2018: Learning & Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29660377/apathy-following-traumatic-brain-injury-a-review
#8
Andrew Worthington, Rodger Ll Wood
Apathy is a common problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can have a major impact on cognitive function, psychosocial outcome and engagement in rehabilitation. For scientists and clinicians it remains one of the least understood aspects of brain-behaviour relationships encompassing disturbances of cognition, motivation, emotion and action, and is variously an indication of organic brain disease or psychiatric disorder. Apathy can be both sign and symptom and has been proposed as a diagnosis in its own right as well as a secondary feature of other conditions...
April 13, 2018: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29659937/an-accidental-scientist-chance-failure-risk-taking-and-mentoring
#9
Patrick J McGrath
I never intended to become a scientist. My career developed on the basis of chance happenings, repeated failure, the willingness to take risks and the acceptance and provision of mentoring. My career has included periods of difficulty and shifted back and forth between academic health centers and universities in Canada. Although I have been amply recognized for my successes, my greatest learning has come from my failures. My greatest satisfaction has been in the development, evaluation and dissemination of interventions...
April 6, 2018: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650698/credit-assignment-in-a-motor-decision-making-task-is-influenced-by-agency-and-not-sensorimotor-prediction-errors
#10
Darius E Parvin, Samuel D McDougle, Jordan A Taylor, Richard B Ivry
Failures to obtain reward can occur from errors in action selection or action execution. Recently, we observed marked differences in choice behavior when the failure to obtain a reward was attributed to errors in action execution compared to errors in action selection (McDougle et al. , 2016). Specifically, participants appeared to solve this credit assignment problem by discounting outcomes in which the absence of reward was attributed to errors in action execution. Building on recent evidence indicating relatively direct communication between the cerebellum and basal ganglia, we hypothesized that cerebellar-dependent sensory-prediction errors (SPEs), a signal indicating execution failure, could attenuate value updating within a basal-ganglia dependent reinforcement learning system...
April 12, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650163/developing-a-health-education-game-for-preschoolers-what-should-we-consider
#11
Arbianingsih, Yeni Rustina, Tri Krianto, Dian Ayubi
OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive picture of what preschoolers prefer in computer game so that such game may be developed as a medium in health education. This is an important step to attract the children's attention so that the learning objectives from the educational game can be achieved. METHOD: This study used descriptive qualitative approach and involved seven children aged from three to six years. Purposive sampling was used to choose participants in accordance with the inclusion criteria...
February 2018: Enfermería Clínica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29626649/random-forest-based-classification-of-alcohol-dependence-patients-and-healthy-controls-using-resting-state-mri
#12
Xi Zhu, Xiaofei Du, Mike Kerich, Falk W Lohoff, Reza Momenan
Currently, classification of alcohol use disorder (AUD) is made on clinical grounds; however, robust evidence shows that chronic alcohol use leads to neurochemical and neurocircuitry adaptations. Identifications of the neuronal networks that are affected by alcohol would provide a more systematic way of diagnosis and provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of AUD. In this study, we identified network-level brain features of AUD, and further quantified resting-state within-network, and between-network connectivity features in a multivariate fashion that are classifying AUD, thus providing additional information about how each network contributes to alcoholism...
April 4, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29626297/effects-of-feedback-reliability-on-feedback-related-brain-activity-a-feedback-valuation-account
#13
Benjamin Ernst, Marco Steinhauser
Adaptive decision making relies on learning from feedback. Because feedback sometimes can be misleading, optimal learning requires that knowledge about the feedback's reliability be utilized to adjust feedback processing. Although previous research has shown that feedback reliability indeed influences feedback processing, the underlying mechanisms through which this is accomplished remain unclear. Here we propose that feedback processing is adjusted by the adaptive, top-down valuation of feedback. We assume that unreliable feedback is devalued relative to reliable feedback, thus reducing the reward prediction errors that underlie feedback-related brain activity and learning...
April 6, 2018: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29617217/emphasizing-the-positive-in-positive-reinforcement-using-non-binary-rewarding-for-training-monkeys-on-cognitive-tasks
#14
Benjamin Fischer, Detlef Wegener
Non-human primates constitute an indispensable model system for studying higher brain func-tions at the neurophysiological level. Studies involving these animals elucidated the neuronal mechanisms of various cognitive and executive functions, such as visual attention, working memory, and decision-making. Positive Reinforcement Training (PRT) constitutes the gold standard for training animals on the cognitive tasks employed in these studies. In the laboratory, PRT is usually based on applying a liquid reward as the reinforcer to strengthen the desired be-havior, and absence of the reward if the animal's response was wrong...
April 4, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29615189/translational-assessments-of-reward-and-anhedonia-a-tribute-to-athina-markou
#15
REVIEW
Andre Der-Avakian, Diego A Pizzagalli
Loss of pleasure (clinically referred to as anhedonia), impairments in other reward-related processes such as reward learning, motivation, and reward valuation, and blunted affect characterize several mood and other psychiatric disorders. Despite the availability of many therapeutic options for these disorders, reward-related impairments remain challenging to treat and often persist despite alleviation of other symptoms. Lack of animal models of reward-related impairments and affect that have high construct and predictive validity is a key obstacle to developing novel treatments...
February 24, 2018: Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29608953/training-memory-without-aversion-appetitive-hole-board-spatial-learning-increases-adult-hippocampal-neurogenesis
#16
Patricia Sampedro-Piquero, Román D Moreno-Fernández, M Carmen Mañas-Padilla, Sara Gil-Rodríguez, Ana Luisa Gavito, Francisco J Pavón, Carmen Pedraza, María García-Fernández, David Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, Luis J Santín, Estela Castilla-Ortega
Learning experiences are potent modulators of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN). However, the vast majority of findings on the learning-induced regulation of AHN derive from aversively-motivated tasks, mainly the water maze paradigm, in which stress is a confounding factor that affects the AHN outcome. Currently, little is known regarding the effect of appetitively-motivated training on AHN. Hence we studied how spatial learning to find food rewards in a hole-board maze modulates AHN (cell proliferation and immature neurons) and AHN-related hippocampal neuroplasticity markers (BDNF, IGF-II and CREB phosphorylation) in mice...
March 30, 2018: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29608775/structural-and-functional-neuroimaging-of-polygenic-risk-for-schizophrenia-a-recall-by-genotype-based-approach
#17
Thomas M Lancaster, Stavros L Dimitriadis, Katherine E Tansey, Gavin Perry, Niklas Ihssen, Derek K Jones, Krish D Singh, Peter Holmans, Andrew Pocklington, George Davey Smith, Stan Zammit, Jeremy Hall, Michael C O'Donovan, Michael J Owen, David E Linden
Risk profile scores (RPS) derived from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explain a considerable amount of susceptibility for schizophrenia (SCZ). However, little is known about how common genetic risk factors for SCZ influence the structure and function of the human brain, largely due to the constraints of imaging sample sizes. In the current study, we use a novel recall-by-genotype (RbG) methodological approach, where we sample young adults from a population cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children: N genotyped = 8365) based on their SCZ-RPS...
March 28, 2018: Schizophrenia Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606656/engaging-oral-health-students-in-learning-basic-science-through-assessment-that-weaves-in-personal-experience
#18
Delyse Leadbeatter, Jinlong Gao
Learning basic science forms an essential foundation for oral health therapy and dentistry, but frequently students perceive it as difficult, dry, and disconnected from clinical practice. This perception is encouraged by assessment methods that reward fact memorization, such as objective examinations. This study evaluated use of a learner-centered assessment portfolio designed to increase student engagement with basic science in an oral health therapy program at the University of Sydney, Australia. The aim of this qualitative study based on focus groups was to investigate students' engagement with basic science courses following introduction of the portfolio...
April 2018: Journal of Dental Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29604808/reinforced-dynamics-for-enhanced-sampling-in-large-atomic-and-molecular-systems
#19
Linfeng Zhang, Han Wang, Weinan E
A new approach for efficiently exploring the configuration space and computing the free energy of large atomic and molecular systems is proposed, motivated by an analogy with reinforcement learning. There are two major components in this new approach. Like metadynamics, it allows for an efficient exploration of the configuration space by adding an adaptively computed biasing potential to the original dynamics. Like deep reinforcement learning, this biasing potential is trained on the fly using deep neural networks, with data collected judiciously from the exploration and an uncertainty indicator from the neural network model playing the role of the reward function...
March 28, 2018: Journal of Chemical Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29601896/differentiating-between-bipolar-and-unipolar-depression-in-functional-and-structural-mri-studies
#20
REVIEW
Kyu-Man Han, Domenico De Berardis, Michele Fornaro, Yong-Ku Kim
Distinguishing depression in bipolar disorder (BD) from unipolar depression (UD) solely based on clinical clues is difficult, which has led to the exploration of promising neural markers in neuroimaging measures for discriminating between BD depression and UD. In this article, we review structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies that directly compare UD and BD depression based on neuroimaging modalities including functional MRI studies on regional brain activation or functional connectivity, structural MRI on gray or white matter morphology, and pattern classification analyses using a machine learning approach...
March 27, 2018: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
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