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Social justice

Mauro Castelló González, Reinaldo Pons Vásquez, David Rodriguez Bencomo, Imti Choonara
Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration...
October 18, 2016: Children
Maya K Gislason, Holly K Andersen
We consider the case of intensive resource extractive projects in the Blueberry River First Nations in Northern British Columbia, Canada, as a case study. Drawing on the parallels between concepts of cumulative environmental and cumulative health impacts, we highlight three axes along which to gauge the effects of intensive extraction projects. These are environmental, health, and social justice axes. Using an intersectional analysis highlights the way in which using individual indicators to measure impact, rather than considering cumulative effects, hides the full extent by which the affected First Nations communities are impacted by intensive extraction projects...
October 18, 2016: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
Jennifer Anderson, Julie Hulstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Susan Hillis, James Mercy, Janet Saul, Jessie Gleckel, Neetu Abad, Howard Kress
More than 1 billion children - half the children in the world - are victims of violence every year. As part of the Post-2015 sustainable development agenda, the UN has issued a global call-to-action: to eliminate violence against children. Essential to preventing violence against children is guidance to countries on using the best available evidence to address this problem. THRIVES provides this evidence. It represents a framework of complementary strategies that, taken together, have potential to achieve and sustain efforts to prevent violence against children...
September 2016: Journal of Public Health Policy
Beth A Ekelman, Darcy L Allison, Dario Duvnjak, Dorothy R DiMarino, John Jodzio, Paolo V Iannarelli
Little is known about how participating in a wellness program influences the well-being of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study is to explore how men with SCI describe their experiences and meaning of participating in a wellness center program, how they perceived these experiences as influencing their well-being, and how these experiences relate to co-occupations and occupational spin-off concepts. Investigators employed a descriptive qualitative design. Four adult males with an SCI participated in the study...
October 6, 2016: OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health
Álvaro Franco-Giraldo
This article presents a Latin American vision of global health from a counterhegemonic perspective, applicable to various countries of the world in similar circumstances. It begins by reviewing several concepts and trends in global health and outlining the differences between conventional public health, international health, and global health, but without seeing them as antagonistic, instead situating them in a model that is based on global health and also includes the other two disciplines. It is understood that global factors influenced earlier theories, schemes, and models of classic international health...
February 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Karen Bell
Gender continues to be a relatively marginal issue in environmental justice debates and yet it remains an important aspect of injustice. To help redress the balance, this article explores women's experience of environmental justice through a review of the existing literature and the author's prior qualitative research, as well as her experience of environmental activism. The analysis confirms that women tend to experience inequitable environmental burdens (distributional injustice); and are less likely than men to have control over environmental decisions (procedural injustice), both of which impact on their health (substantive injustice)...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Jessica Shaw, Rebecca Campbell, Debi Cain
Prior research has documented the problematic community response to sexual assault: the majority of sexual assaults reported to police are never prosecuted. Social dominance theory suggests that this response is a form of institutional discrimination, intended to maintain existing social structures, and that police personnel likely draw upon shared ideologies to justify their decision-making in sexual assault case investigations. This study drew upon social dominance theory to examine how police justified their investigatory decisions to identify potential leverage points for change...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Community Psychology
Jay Pan, Hanqing Zhao, Xiuli Wang, Xun Shi
In 2009, the Chinese government launched a new round of healthcare reform, which encourages development of private hospitals. Meanwhile, many public hospitals in China also became increasingly profit-oriented. These trends have led to concerns about social justice and regional disparity. However, there is a lack of empirical scientific analysis to support the debate. We started to fill this gap by conducting a regional-level analysis of spatial variation in spatial access to hospitals in the Sichuan Province...
October 1, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Sarah Nutter, Shelly Russell-Mayhew, Angela S Alberga, Nancy Arthur, Anusha Kassan, Darren E Lund, Monica Sesma-Vazquez, Emily Williams
Weight bias is a form of stigma with detrimental effects on the health and wellness of individuals with large bodies. Researchers from various disciplines have recognized weight bias as an important topic for public health and for professional practice. To date, researchers from various areas have approached weight bias from independent perspectives and from differing theoretical orientations. In this paper, we examined the similarities and differences between three perspectives (i.e., weight-centric, non-weight-centric (health-centric), and health at every size) used to understand weight bias and approach weight bias research with regard to (a) language about people with large bodies, (b) theoretical position, (c) identified consequences of weight bias, and (d) identified influences on weight-based social inequity...
2016: Journal of Obesity
Ehsan Shamsi Gooshki, Raheleh Rezaei, Verina Wild
This paper presents a systematic literature review of studies that shed light on the health of migrants in Iran from the perspective of social justice. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Iranian databases, including IranMedex, Magiran, and SID, in June 2012. All studies that were published until June 2012 describing the health status of migrants - including refugees - in Iran were included. The search results were categorisoyed according to an adapted version of the six dimensions of well-being in Madison Powers' and Ruth Faden's theory of social justice in health...
October 2016: Archives of Iranian Medicine
Maria Gouveia-Pereira, Jorge Vala, Isabel Correia
BACKGROUND: Teachers' legitimacy is central to school functioning. Teachers' justice, whether distributive or procedural, predicts teachers' legitimacy. AIMS: What is still do be found, and constitutes the goal of this paper, is whether unjust treatment by a teacher affects the legitimacy of the teacher differently when the student knows that the teacher was fair to a peer (comparative judgement) or when the student does not have that information (autonomous judgement)...
October 15, 2016: British Journal of Educational Psychology
Courtenay Sprague, Michael L Scanlon, Bharathi Radhakrishnan, David W Pantalone
Incarcerated women face significant barriers to achieve continuous HIV care. We employed a descriptive, exploratory design using qualitative methods and the theoretical construct of agency to investigate participants' self-reported experiences accessing HIV services in jail, in prison, and post-release in two Alabama cities. During January 2014, we conducted in-depth interviews with 25 formerly incarcerated HIV-positive women. Two researchers completed independent coding, producing preliminary codes from transcripts using content analysis...
October 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Stella M Resko, Suzanne Brown, Natasha S Mendoza, Shantel Crosby, Antonio González-Prendes
OBJECTIVE: Perception of need is a key factor that influences decisions to seek help and complete treatment for substance use and mental health problems. In the current study, we examine patterns of perceived treatment needs among women with co-occurring substance use disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and explore how these patterns are associated with demographics, psychosocial variables, and treatment-related factors. METHODS: Secondary data analysis of the Women and Trauma Study from the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trial Network was conducted...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Dual Diagnosis
Verina Wild, Bridget Pratt
The ethics of health incentive research-a form of public health research-are not well developed, and concerns of justice have been least examined. In this paper, we explore what potential long term harms in relation to justice may occur as a result of such research and whether they should be considered as part of its ethical evaluation. 'Long term harms' are defined as harms that contribute to existing systematic patterns of disadvantage for groups. Their effects are experienced on a long term basis, persisting even once an incentive research project ends...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
Craig Cumming, Lakkhina Troeung, Jesse T Young, Erin Kelty, David B Preen
BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine use is associated with a range of poor health, social and justice outcomes. In many parts of the world increased methamphetamine use has been identified as a major public health concern. Methamphetamine treatment programmes have been effective in reducing and ceasing use, however a range of barriers have prevented these programmes being widely adopted by methamphetamine users. This review examines the barriers to accessing meth/amphetamine treatment identified in the literature...
October 6, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Niro Kandasamy, Karen Soldatic, Dinesha Samararatne
This article draws on grounded qualitative research with rural Tamil women who acquired a disability during the civil war in Sri Lanka and conceptualizes an intersectionality-peace framework. Three main themes were developed from the interviews: narratives of conflict, survival outcomes of social assistance and mobilization of cross-ethnic relationships. With the support of a local women's disability advocacy organization, Tamil women with disabilities were enabled to overcome social stigma and claim a positive identity as women with disabilities...
October 13, 2016: Medicine, Conflict, and Survival
Alisia G T T Tran, Jeffrey S Mintert, Gilbert B Jew
This article utilizes moderated mediation analyses to explore whether the relations between parental ethnic-racial socialization (PERS) dimensions and social attitudes differ across ethnic-racial minority (n = 128) and White (n = 131) college-going emerging adults. We examined social dominance orientation (SDO) as an index of antiegalitarian intergroup attitudes and attitudes toward interpersonal harmony as an index of interpersonal attitudes. We tested whether there were ethnic-racial variations in mediation models in which each type of PERS dimension was expected to be linked to greater antiegalitarian attitudes (greater SDO), which, in turn, was predicted to be associated with less prosocial attitudes (lower harmony enhancement)...
August 15, 2016: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Felice Carabellese, Donatella La Tegola, Lucia Margari, Francesco Craig, Alessio Ostuni, Ermenegilda Scardaccione, Francesca Perrini, Francesco Margari
OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to identify possible risk factors related to carrying out of illegal conducts by minors on their first offense, and any individual variables, family, economic and socio-cultural related to phenomenon also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The longitudinal study involved the acquisition of a series of biographical information, family, school, behavioral and clinical characteristics of children on their first crime recruited over a year in Puglia Region...
July 2016: Rivista di Psichiatria
Tiffeny R Jimenez, Bernadette Sánchez, Susan D McMahon, Judah Viola
As we reflect on the founding vision of the field of community psychology in the United States, we assess our progress toward achieving, building upon, and refining this vision. We review early literature regarding the US vision of the field, provide a historical overview of education and training within the field, and provide recommendations to guide and strengthen our approach to education. Our recommendations include the following: (a) serve as a resource to communities, (b) promote a sense of community within our field, (c) diversify students, faculty, and leadership, (d) evaluate our efforts, (e) be current and relevant, (f) enhance the visibility and growth of our field, and (g) create globally minded and innovative CPists...
October 11, 2016: American Journal of Community Psychology
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