Read by QxMD icon Read

Infant botulism

Sarah S Long
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Arti Sharma, Sarkaraisamy Ponmariappan, Rani Sarita, Syed Imtiaz Alam, Dev Vrat Kamboj, Sangeeta Shukla
Diseases triggered by microorganisms can be controlled by vaccines, which need neutralizing antigens. Hence, it is very crucial to identify extremely efficient immunogens for immune prevention. Botulism, a fatal neuroparalytic disease, is caused by botulinum neurotoxins produced by the anaerobic, Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria, Clostridium botulinum. Food-borne botulism and iatrogenic botulism are caused by botulinum toxin. Wound botulism, infant botulism, and adult intestinal botulism are caused by primarily C...
January 13, 2018: Current Microbiology
Jessica R Payne, Jessica M Khouri, Nicholas P Jewell, Stephen S Arnon
OBJECTIVES: To report the efficacy of Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV) in the first 12 years following its licensure in 2003 and to characterize its use nationwide in treating patients with infant botulism. STUDY DESIGN: Medical records and billing information were collected for US patients treated with BIG-IV from 2003 to 2015. Length of hospital stay (LOS) and hospital charge information for treated patients were compared with the BIG-IV Pivotal Clinical Trial Placebo Group to quantify decreases in LOS and hospital charges...
February 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Jessica M Khouri, Jessica R Payne, Stephen S Arnon
OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the actual diagnoses of 76 patients (2005-2015) whose clinical presentations so closely resembled infant botulism that the patients were treated with Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV; BabyBIG), but whose illnesses subsequently were not laboratory confirmed as infant botulism ("clinical mimics" of infant botulism). STUDY DESIGN: The California Department of Public Health produces BIG-IV and distributes it nationwide as a public service (ie, not-for-profit) orphan drug to treat patients hospitalized with suspected infant botulism...
February 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Osnat Rosen, Liron Feldberg, Tamar Shamai Yamin, Eyal Dor, Ada Barnea, Avi Weissberg, Ran Zichel
Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. The Endopep-MS assay permits rapid detection and serotypic differential diagnosis of BoNTs. The serotype-specific nature of this assay requires that each serum sample be aliquoted and individually tested, which in addition to the limited volume of clinical samples, especially in infants, points to the need for a multiplex assay. However, previous attempts to develop such an assay have been challenging, mainly due to inhibition of BoNT/A activity by the BoNT/E peptide substrate...
November 1, 2017: Scientific Reports
Tomoko Kohda, Keiji Nakamura, Koji Hosomi, Yasushi Torii, Shunji Kozaki, Masafumi Mukamoto
Clostridium botulinum produces the highly potent neurotoxin, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), which is classified into seven serotypes, A-G, and the subtype classification is confirmed by the diversity of the amino acid sequence among the serotypes. The BoNT from the Osaka05 strain is associated with type B infant botulism and has been divided into BoNT/B subtype B6 (BoNT/B6) by phylogenetic analysis and the antigenicity of its C-terminal heavy chain (HC) domain. However, the molecular basis for its properties, including the potency, is poorly understood...
September 12, 2017: Microbiology and Immunology
Bergitte Drivenes, Tyra Grove Krause, Mikael Andersson, Luise Müller, Kurt Fuursted, Tanja Pedersen, Anne Kirkeby Hansen, Malene Landbo Børresen
INTRODUCTION: Infant botulism is a rare, probably underdiagnosed, life-threatening disease caused by the toxin-producing bacterium Clostridium botulinum. METHODS: We investigated reported cases of infant botulism in Denmark from 1995 to 2015, and compared the incidence with that of other western countries. RESULTS: We found nine cases of infant botulism in Denmark from 1995 to 2015. The incidence of infant botulism in Denmark was similar to that seen in other western countries, but likely underestimated...
September 2017: Danish Medical Journal
Laura Jackson, Suneeta Madan-Khetarpal, Monica Naik, Marian G Michaels, Melissa Riley
Background  Though botulism is a rare disease overall, all infants younger than 1 year of age are at risk of contracting infant botulism, the most prevalent form reported in the United States. Nonetheless, infant botulism is frequently omitted from the differential diagnosis of the very young neonate exclusively due to age, and the diagnosis is often only considered secondarily after a costly and prolonged work up is undertaken. Delayed diagnosis can lead not only to unnecessary testing but also to prolonged hospital stay and increased morbidity...
July 2017: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
Sverre Wikström, Elisabet Holst
Infant botulism - why honey should be avoided for children up to one year Infant botulism means that Clostridium botulinum colonize and produce toxin in the infant gut, usually during the first year of life. Illness severity varies widely and the incidence may be under-estimated. Infant botulism should be considered in cases of acute muscle weakness or floppiness in infants, especially when accompanied by constipation or feeding difficulties. Respiratory failure and need for mechanical ventilation is common, but full recovery is gradually obtained...
July 24, 2017: Läkartidningen
Riffat Mehboob, Mahvish Kabir, Naseer Ahmed, Fridoon Jawad Ahmad
Sudden perinatal death that includes the victims of sudden infant death syndrome, sudden intrauterine death syndrome, and stillbirth are heartbreaking events in the life of parents. Most of the studies about sudden perinatal death were reported from Italy, highlighting two main etiological factors: prone sleeping position and smoking. Other probable contributory factors are prematurity, male gender, lack of breastfeeding, respiratory tract infections, use of pacifiers, infant botulism, extensive use of pesticides and insecticides, etc...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
Yin Ping Dong, Wei Wang, Tao Jiang, Jin Xu, Chun Hui Han, Shao Fei Yan, Séamus Fanning, Ying Li, Xiao Chen Ma, Di Zhang, Yao Zhao, Biao Zeng, Feng Qin Li
Laboratory-based pathogen isolation, identification, and toxicity determination were performed on samples from a suspected case of infant botulism. Mice injected with cultures generated from the enema sample and ingested Powered infant formula (PIF) presented typical signs of botulism. Antitoxins to polyvalent botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and monovalent BoNT type B antitoxin had protective effects. Clostridium botulinum isolated from the enema and residual PIF samples were positive for type B toxin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that the two strains of C...
June 2017: Biomedical and Environmental Sciences: BES
Jessica L Halpin, Lavin Joseph, Janet K Dykes, Loretta McCroskey, Elise Smith, Denise Toney, Steven Stroika, Kelley Hise, Susan Maslanka, Carolina Lúquez
Clostridium botulinum strains are prevalent in the environment and produce a potent neurotoxin that causes botulism, a rare but serious paralytic disease. In 2010, a national PulseNet database was established to curate C. botulinum pulsotypes and facilitate epidemiological investigations, particularly for serotypes A and B strains frequently associated with botulism cases in the United States. Between 2010 and 2014 we performed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using a PulseNet protocol, uploaded the resulting PFGE patterns into a national database, and analyzed data according to PulseNet criteria (UPGMA clustering, Dice coefficient, 1...
September 2017: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Fabrizio Anniballi, Bruna Auricchio, Alfonsina Fiore, Davide Lonati, Carlo Alessandro Locatelli, Florigio Lista, Silvia Fillo, Giuseppina Mandarino, Dario De Medici
Botulism is a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease caused by botulinum toxins. Because of its high potential impact on public health, botulism is a closely monitored communicable disease in Europe. In Italy, which has one of the highest incidence rates in Europe (0.03 cases per 100,000 population), botulism is monitored through a case-based passive surveillance system: the front-line physician who diagnoses a suspected case must notify the Local Health Units immediately, and the Ministry of Health's office within 12 hours...
June 15, 2017: Euro Surveillance: Bulletin Européen sur les Maladies Transmissibles, European Communicable Disease Bulletin
Amelia K Watson, Sascha Ellington, Christina Nelson, Tracee Treadwell, Denise J Jamieson, Dana M Meaney-Delman
Intentional release of infectious agents and biological weapons to cause illness and death has the potential to greatly impact pregnant women and their fetuses. We review what is known about the maternal and fetal effects of seven biological threats: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); variola virus (smallpox); Clostridium botulinum toxin (botulism); Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); and Rickettsia prowazekii (typhus)...
March 15, 2017: Birth Defects Research
Carla Ormundo Gonçalves Ximenes Lima, Vinicius Magno da Rocha, Eliane de Oliveira Ferreira, Joaquim Santos Filho, Lucia Rodrigues Serradas, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva, Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto Domingues
INTRODUCTION: Clostridium baratii is rarely associated with human diseases. Infection is usuallcaused by ingestion of contaminated food, and infant botulism is the most common clinical presentation. CASE REPORT: Here we report a case of pneumonia by a non-toxigenic strain of C. baratii in an Alzheimer 70-year-old male with sepsis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The micro-organism was identified by phenotypical tests, mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF), DNA amplification (PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene...
August 2016: JMM Case Reports
Anita J Campbell, Geoff Knight, Peter Walsh, Asha C Bowen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Chloé Connan, Marie Voillequin, Carolina Varela Chavez, Christelle Mazuet, Christian Leveque, Sandrine Vitry, Alain Vandewalle, Michel R Popoff
Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for severe flaccid paralysis by inhibiting the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junctions. BoNT type B (BoNT/B) most often induces mild forms of botulism with predominant dysautonomic symptoms. In food borne botulism and botulism by intestinal colonisation such as infant botulism, which are the most frequent naturally acquired forms of botulism, the digestive tract is the main entry route of BoNTs into the organism. We previously showed that BoNT/B translocates through mouse intestinal barrier by an endocytosis-dependent mechanism and subsequently targets neuronal cells, mainly cholinergic neurons, in the intestinal mucosa and musculosa...
March 11, 2017: Cellular Microbiology
Jimme Sierakowski, Jason Arthur, Todd Wylie
BACKGROUND: Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is increasing in incidence in the United States and presenting to emergency departments (EDs) across the country. This clinical entity presents as acute paralysis, with magnetic resonance imaging changes in the gray matter only in children younger than 21 years of age. The etiology is unknown, although preceding viral illnesses are common. There are no consensus guidelines regarding treatment. CASE REPORT: A 4-month-old girl presented with decreased bilateral arm movement...
June 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Charlotte Jane Joseph, Teik Beng Khoo, Keng Yee Lee
An infant, who was born preterm at 36 weeks, presented with fever and ulcer at umbilical region which progressed to necrotising fasciitis of anterior abdominal wall. He was treated with intravenous penicillin, intravenous cloxacillin and local application of medicated honey. Subsequently, he required wound debridement. Postoperatively, he required prolonged invasive ventilation due to poor respiratory effort which was associated with hypotonia and areflexia. Nerve conduction study revealed absent responses...
January 6, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
Tamara Opila, Asha George, Mohammad El-Ghanem, Nizar Souayah
BACKGROUND: New therapeutic strategies, including immune globulin intravenous, have emerged in the past two decades for the management of botulism. However, impact on outcomes and hospitalization charges among infants (aged ≤1 year) with botulism in the United States is unknown. METHODS: We analyzed the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) and National Inpatient Sample (NIS) for in-hospital outcomes and charges for infant botulism cases from 1997 to 2009. Demographics, discharge status, mortality, length of stay, and hospitalization charges were reported from the two databases and compared...
February 2017: Pediatric Neurology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"