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Sensory deprivation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144967/a-local-rebalancing-act-leads-to-global-benefit
#1
Ju Lu, Yi Zuo
Barnes et al. (2017) reveal that in the visual cortex of sensory-deprived mice, dendritic spine enlargement correlates with recent spine loss from the same dendritic branch. Such branch-specific homeostatic plasticity highlights dendritic branches as key computational units.
November 15, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118195/binocular-deprivation-induces-both-age-dependent-and-age-independent-forms-of-plasticity-in-parvalbumin-inhibitory-neuron-visual-response-properties
#2
Berquin D Feese, Diego E Pafundo, Meredith N Schmehl, Sandra J Kuhlman
Activity of cortical inhibitory interneurons is rapidly reduced in response to monocular deprivation during the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity and in response to salient events encountered during learning. In the case of primary sensory cortex, a decrease in mean evoked firing rate of parvalbumin-positive (PV) inhibitory neurons is causally linked to a reorganization of excitatory networks following sensory perturbation. Converging evidence indicates that it is deprivation, and not an imbalance between open and closed eye inputs, that triggers rapid plasticity in PV neurons...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111363/absolute-not-relative-interocular-luminance-modulates-sensory-eye-dominance-plasticity-in-adults
#3
Zhimo Yao, Zhifen He, Yonghua Wang, Fan Lu, Jia Qu, Jiawei Zhou, Robert F Hess
If one eye is patched for a period of 2.5 h in human adults, transient changes in sensory eye dominance result with the previously patched eye's contribution being strengthened. Similar changes result from opaque and translucent occlusion suggesting that it is the deprivation of contrast not luminance information that drives these transient shift of sensory eye dominance. However, this does not rule out the possibility that luminance deprivation per se cannot produce changes in sensory eye dominance, indeed based on what we know of the physiology, where the contrast gain of visual neurons is luminance dependent, one would expect it should...
October 27, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29107520/deprivation-induced-homeostatic-spine-scaling-in%C3%A2-vivo-is-localized-to-dendritic-branches-that-have-undergone-recent-spine-loss
#4
Samuel J Barnes, Eleonora Franzoni, R Irene Jacobsen, Ferenc Erdelyi, Gabor Szabo, Claudia Clopath, Georg B Keller, Tara Keck
Synaptic scaling is a key homeostatic plasticity mechanism and is thought to be involved in the regulation of cortical activity levels. Here we investigated the spatial scale of homeostatic changes in spine size following sensory deprivation in a subset of inhibitory (layer 2/3 GAD65-positive) and excitatory (layer 5 Thy1-positive) neurons in mouse visual cortex. Using repeated in vivo two-photon imaging, we find that increases in spine size are tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) dependent and thus are likely associated with synaptic scaling...
November 15, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29094306/early-sensory-experience-influences-the-development-of-multisensory-thalamocortical-and-intracortical-connections-of-primary-sensory-cortices
#5
Julia U Henschke, Anja M Oelschlegel, Frank Angenstein, Frank W Ohl, Jürgen Goldschmidt, Patrick O Kanold, Eike Budinger
The nervous system integrates information from multiple senses. This multisensory integration already occurs in primary sensory cortices via direct thalamocortical and corticocortical connections across modalities. In humans, sensory loss from birth results in functional recruitment of the deprived cortical territory by the spared senses but the underlying circuit changes are not well known. Using tracer injections into primary auditory, somatosensory, and visual cortex within the first postnatal month of life in a rodent model (Mongolian gerbil) we show that multisensory thalamocortical connections emerge before corticocortical connections but mostly disappear during development...
November 1, 2017: Brain Structure & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29053746/external-auditory-exostoses-and-hearing-loss-in-the-shanidar-1-neandertal
#6
Erik Trinkaus, Sébastien Villotte
The Late Pleistocene Shanidar 1 older adult male Neandertal is known for the crushing fracture of his left orbit with a probable reduction in vision, the loss of his right forearm and hand, and evidence of an abnormal gait, as well as probable diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. He also exhibits advanced external auditory exostoses in his left auditory meatus and larger ones with complete bridging across the porus in the right meatus (both Grade 3). These growths indicate at least unilateral conductive hearing (CHL) loss, a serious sensory deprivation for a Pleistocene hunter-gatherer...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29050394/cortical-neurons-and-networks-are-dormant-but-fully-responsive-during-isoelectric-brain-state
#7
Tristan Altwegg-Boussac, Adrien E Schramm, Jimena Ballestero, Fanny Grosselin, Mario Chavez, Sarah Lecas, Michel Baulac, Lionel Naccache, Sophie Demeret, Vincent Navarro, Séverine Mahon, Stéphane Charpier
A continuous isoelectric electroencephalogram reflects an interruption of endogenously-generated activity in cortical networks and systematically results in a complete dissolution of conscious processes. This electro-cerebral inactivity occurs during various brain disorders, including hypothermia, drug intoxication, long-lasting anoxia and brain trauma. It can also be induced in a therapeutic context, following the administration of high doses of barbiturate-derived compounds, to interrupt a hyper-refractory status epilepticus...
September 1, 2017: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29036852/rehabilitation-modality-and-onset-differentially-influence-whisker-sensory-hypersensitivity-after-diffuse-traumatic-brain-injury-in-the-rat
#8
Theresa Currier Thomas, Ellen Magee Stockhausen, L Matthew Law, Aida Khodadad, Jonathan Lifshitz
BACKGROUND: As rehabilitation strategies advance as therapeutic interventions, the modality and onset of rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are critical to optimize treatment. Our laboratory has detected and characterized a late-onset, long-lasting sensory hypersensitivity to whisker stimulation in diffuse brain-injured rats; a deficit that is comparable to visual or auditory sensory hypersensitivity in humans with an acquired brain injury. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that the modality and onset of rehabilitation therapies will differentially influence sensory hypersensitivity in response to the Whisker Nuisance Task (WNT) as well as WNT-induced corticosterone (CORT) stress response in diffuse brain-injured rats and shams...
October 9, 2017: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29033864/novel-measures-to-assess-the-effects-of-partial-sleep-deprivation-on-sensory-working-and-permanent-memory
#9
Dominique Gosselin, Joseph De Koninck, Kenneth Campbell
Sleepiness has repeatedly been demonstrated to affect performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. While the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) have been extensively studied, acute partial sleep deprivation (PSD), a more frequent form of sleep loss, has been studied much less often. The present study examined the effects of sleep deprivation on novel tasks involving classic sensory, working, and permanent memory systems. While the tasks did implicate different memory systems, they shared a need for effortful, sustained attention to maintain successful performance...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29020746/proteomic-landscape-of-the-primary-somatosensory-cortex-upon-sensory-deprivation
#10
Koen Kole, Rik G H Lindeboom, Marijke P A Baltissen, Pascal W T C Jansen, Michiel Vermeulen, Paul Tiesinga, Tansu Celikel
Experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) powerfully shapes neural circuits by inducing long-lasting molecular changes in the brain. Molecular mechanisms of EDP have been traditionally studied by identifying single or small subsets of targets along the biochemical pathways that link synaptic receptors to nuclear processes. Recent technological advances in large-scale analysis of gene transcription and translation now allow systematic observation of thousands of molecules simultaneously. Here we employed label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to address experience-dependent changes in the proteome after sensory deprivation of the primary somatosensory cortex...
October 1, 2017: GigaScience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29020745/transcriptional-mapping-of-the-primary-somatosensory-cortex-upon-sensory-deprivation
#11
Koen Kole, Yutaro Komuro, Jan Provaznik, Jelena Pistolic, Vladimir Benes, Paul Tiesinga, Tansu Celikel
Experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) is essential for anatomical and functional maturation of sensory circuits during development. Although the principal synaptic and circuit mechanisms of EDP are increasingly well studied experimentally and computationally, its molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. EDP can be readily studied in the rodent barrel cortex, where each "barrel column" preferentially represents deflections of its own principal whisker. Depriving select whiskers while sparing their neighbours introduces competition between barrel columns, ultimately leading to weakening of intracortical, translaminar (i...
October 1, 2017: GigaScience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988830/effects-of-neonatal-deafness-on-resting-state-functional-network-connectivity
#12
Daniel Stolzberg, Blake E Butler, Stephen G Lomber
Normal brain development depends on early sensory experience. Behavioral consequences of brain maturation in the absence of sensory input early in life are well documented. For example, experiments with mature, neonatally deaf human or animal subjects have revealed improved peripheral visual motion detection and spatial localization abilities. Such supranormal behavioral abilities in the nondeprived sensory modality are evidence of compensatory plasticity occurring in deprived brain regions at some point or throughout development...
October 6, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988151/does-a-lack-of-auditory-experience-affect-sequential-learning
#13
Janne von Koss Torkildsen, Joanne Arciuli, Christiane Lingås Haukedal, Ona Bø Wie
To understand the interaction between sensory experiences and cognition, it is critical to investigate the possibility that deprivation in one sensory modality might affect cognition in other modalities. Here we are concerned with the hypothesis that early experience with sound is vital to the development of domain-general sequential processing skills. In line with this hypothesis, a seminal empirical study found that prelingually deaf children had impaired sequence learning in the visual modality. In order to assess the limits of this hypothesis, the current study employed a different visual sequence learning task in an investigation of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants and normal hearing children...
October 6, 2017: Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28982544/electrophysiological-correlates-and-psychoacoustic-characteristics-of-hearing-motion-synaesthesia
#14
Nicolas Rothen, Gergely Bartl, Anna Franklin, Jamie Ward
People with hearing-motion synaesthesia experience sounds from moving or changing (e.g. flickering) visual stimuli. This phenomenon may be one of the most common forms of synaesthesia but it has rarely been studied and there are no studies of its neural basis. We screened for this in a sample of 200+ individuals, and estimated a prevalence of 4.2%. We also document its characteristics: it tends to be induced by physically moving stimuli (more so than static stimuli which imply motion or trigger illusory motion); and the psychoacoustic features are simple (e...
October 2, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28979619/-usher-syndrome-about-a-case
#15
Chama Daoudi, Noureddine Boutimzine, Samia El Haouzi, Omar Lezrek, Samira Tachfouti, Mounir Lezrek, Mina Laghmari, Rajae Daoudi
Usher syndrome is a genetic disease resulting in double sensory deprivation (auditory and visual) called deafblindness. We report the case of a 50-year old patient, born to consanguineous parents, presenting with congenital deafness associated with normal vestibular function and pigmentary retinopathy responsible for decreased bilateral visual acuity occurred at the age of 16 years. This association composes Usher syndrome type 2, a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Cataract surgery allowed visual acuity improvement in this patient...
2017: Pan African Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28977574/the-effects-of-experimental-manipulation-of-sleep-duration-on-neural-response-to-food-cues
#16
Kathryn E Demos, Lawrence H Sweet, Chantelle N Hart, Jeanne M McCaffery, Samantha E Williams, Kimberly A Mailloux, Jennifer Trautvetter, Max M Owens, Rena R Wing
Despite growing literature on neural food cue responsivity in obesity, little is known about how the brain processes food cues following partial sleep deprivation and whether short sleep leads to changes similar to those observed in obesity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that short sleep leads to increased reward-related and decreased inhibitory control-related processing of food cues.In a within-subject design, 30 participants (22 female, mean age = 36.7 standard deviation = 10...
November 1, 2017: Sleep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28974374/the-role-of-sex-in-sleep-deprivation-related-changes-of-nociception-and-conditioned-pain-modulation
#17
Nicole Eichhorn, Rolf-Detlef Treede, Sigrid Schuh-Hofer
Sex matters both in the clinical field of pain and sleep medicine. Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in chronic pain patients and have been shown to deteriorate the pain condition. The pathomechanisms by which insomnia aggravates pain are currently unknown. Descending pain control may be compromised by disturbed sleep, but respective studies are few, inconsistent and largely imbalanced with respect to sex. We studied the role of sex on the effect of sleep deprivation on endogenous pain modulation and on nociceptive thresholds in a highly homogenous study population of 18 female (23...
October 1, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971005/auditory-cross-modal-reorganization-in-cochlear-implant-users-indicates-audio-visual-integration
#18
Maren Stropahl, Stefan Debener
There is clear evidence for cross-modal cortical reorganization in the auditory system of post-lingually deafened cochlear implant (CI) users. A recent report suggests that moderate sensori-neural hearing loss is already sufficient to initiate corresponding cortical changes. To what extend these changes are deprivation-induced or related to sensory recovery is still debated. Moreover, the influence of cross-modal reorganization on CI benefit is also still unclear. While reorganization during deafness may impede speech recovery, reorganization also has beneficial influences on face recognition and lip-reading...
2017: NeuroImage: Clinical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28947578/visual-experience-shapes-the-neural-networks-remapping-touch-into-external-space
#19
Virginie Crollen, Latifa Lazzouni, Mohamed Rezk, Antoine Bellemare, Franco Lepore, Olivier Collignon
Localizing touch relies on the activation of skin-based and externally defined spatial frames of reference. Psychophysical studies have demonstrated that early visual deprivation prevents the automatic remapping of touch into external space. We used fMRI to characterize how visual experience impacts the brain circuits dedicated to the spatial processing of touch. Sighted and congenitally blind humans performed a tactile temporal order judgment (TOJ) task, either with the hands uncrossed or crossed over the body midline...
October 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28943083/the-jellyfish-cassiopea-exhibits-a-sleep-like-state
#20
Ravi D Nath, Claire N Bedbrook, Michael J Abrams, Ty Basinger, Justin S Bois, David A Prober, Paul W Sternberg, Viviana Gradinaru, Lea Goentoro
Do all animals sleep? Sleep has been observed in many vertebrates, and there is a growing body of evidence for sleep-like states in arthropods and nematodes [1-5]. Here we show that sleep is also present in Cnidaria [6-8], an earlier-branching metazoan lineage. Cnidaria and Ctenophora are the first metazoan phyla to evolve tissue-level organization and differentiated cell types, such as neurons and muscle [9-15]. In Cnidaria, neurons are organized into a non-centralized radially symmetric nerve net [11, 13, 15-17] that nevertheless shares fundamental properties with the vertebrate nervous system: action potentials, synaptic transmission, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters [15-20]...
October 9, 2017: Current Biology: CB
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