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Asthma, sarcoidosis

Shamila D Alipoor, Ian M Adcock, Johan Garssen, Esmaeil Mortaz, Mohammad Varahram, Mehdi Mirsaeidi, Aliakbar Velayati
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs which can act as master regulators of gene expression, modulate almost all biological process and are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been associated with aberrant gene expression and may lead to pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that miRNA expression profiles are altered between health and disease and as such may be considered as biomarkers of disease. Evidence is increasing that miRNAs are particularly important in lung homeostasis and development and have been demonstrated to be the involved in many pulmonary diseases such as asthma, COPD, sarcoidosis, lung cancer and other smoking related diseases...
September 12, 2016: European Journal of Pharmacology
Zdenka Navratilova, Eva Novosadova, Michael Hagemann-Jensen, Susanna Kullberg, Vitezslav Kolek, Johan Grunewald, Martin Petrek
BACKGROUND: Sarcoidosis is characterised by up-regulation of cytokines and chemokine ligands/receptors and proteolytic enzymes. This pro-inflammatory profile is regulated post-transcriptionally by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). We investigated in vivo expression of six RBPs (AUF1, HuR, NCL, TIA, TIAR, PCBP2) and two inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes (RECK, PTEN) in pulmonary sarcoidosis and compared it to the expression in four control groups of healthy individuals and patients with other respiratory diseases: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs)...
2016: PloS One
Haru Yamamoto, David A Khan
A 45-year-old man who presented with dyspnea and chest tightness was found to have obstructive lung disease and eosinophilia of 10,300 eosinophils/μL. The differential diagnosis encompassed causes of primary eosinophilia and secondary eosinophilia associated with pulmonary disease, including asthma, environmental allergic reaction, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, parasitic infections, tuberculosis, fungal infection, sarcoidosis, mastocytosis, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, lymphoproliferative hypereosinophilic syndrome, and myeloproliferative hypereosinophilic syndrome...
May 2016: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings:
Antonino Tuttolomondo, Irene Simonetta, Domenico Di Raimondo, Roberta Conigliaro, Francesca Corpora, Valerio Vassallo, Antonio Pinto
BACKGROUND: IgG4-related disease is a rare, clinical and pathologic disease entity of unknown etiology. Its main features are increased serum concentrations of IgG4 > 1,35 g/l, lymphocyte and IgG4+plasma-cell infiltration within tissues, fibrosis or sclerosis. The classical presentation of IgG4-RSD is pancreatitis which is combined with the involvement of biliary ducts in 74 percent of patients. Extrapancreatic manifestations include: abdominal or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; the involvement of salivary glands and lacrimal glands, kidneys, lung, retroperitoneum...
May 10, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
C Hamsten, A Häggmark, J Grundström, M Mikus, C Lindskog, J R Konradsen, A Eklund, G Pershagen, M Wickman, J Grunewald, E Melén, G Hedlin, P Nilsson, M van Hage
Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation...
September 2016: Allergy
O Göhl, D J Walker, S Walterspacher, D Langer, C M Spengler, T Wanke, M Petrovic, R-H Zwick, S Stieglitz, R Glöckl, D Dellweg, H-J Kabitz
Specific respiratory muscle training (IMT) improves the function of the inspiratory muscles. According to literature and clinical experience, there are 3 established methods: 1.) resistive load 2.) threshold load and 3.) normocapnic hyperpnea. Each training method and the associated devices have specific characteristics. Setting up an IMT should start with specific diagnostics of respiratory muscle function and be followed by detailed individual introduction to training. The aim of this review is to take a closer look at the different training methods for the most relevant indications and to discuss these results in the context of current literature...
January 2016: Pneumologie
Samir S Shoughy, Igor Kozak, Khalid F Tabbara
PURPOSE: To determine the associations of systemic diseases with intermediate uveitis. METHODS: The medical records of 50 consecutive cases with intermediate uveitis referred to The Eye Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were reviewed. Age- and sex-matched patients without uveitis served as controls. Patients had complete ophthalmic and medical examinations. RESULTS: There were 27 male and 23 female patients. Mean age was 29 years with a range of 5-62 years...
2016: Ophthalmic Epidemiology
Ju-Hyeong Park, Jean M Cox-Ganser, Sandra K White, A Scott Laney, Steve M Caulfield, William A Turner, Austin D Sumner, Kathleen Kreiss
We examined microbial correlates of health outcomes in building occupants with a sarcoidosis cluster and excess asthma. We offered employees a questionnaire and pulmonary function testing and collected floor dust and liquid/sludge from drain tubing traps of heat pumps that were analyzed for various microbial agents. Forty-nine percent of participants reported any symptom reflecting possible granulomatous disease (shortness of breath on exertion, flu-like achiness, or fever and chills) weekly in the last 4 weeks...
December 30, 2015: Indoor Air
Timothy Tully, Surinder S Birring
Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder that frequently affects the lungs. Cough is commonly reported by patients and can significantly reduce health-related quality of life. The mechanism of cough is unknown but airway inflammation, mechanical distortion from pulmonary fibrosis and disruption of the vagus nerve are possible. Recent evidence suggests cough reflex hypersensitivity may also be an important mechanism and predictor of the frequency of cough. The investigation of cough should evaluate common causes such as asthma, gastro-oesophageal reflux and rhinitis...
February 2016: Lung
Chris Kosmidis, David W Denning
The clinical presentation of Aspergillus lung disease is determined by the interaction between fungus and host. Invasive aspergillosis develops in severely immunocompromised patients, including those with neutropenia, and increasingly in the non-neutropenic host, including lung transplant recipients, the critically ill patients and patients on steroids. A high index of suspicion is required in patients without the classical risk factors as early presentation is usually silent and non-specific, pyrexia uncommon and timely treatment is crucial for survival...
July 2015: Postgraduate Medical Journal
A Szpechcinski, J Chorostowska-Wynimko, R Struniawski, W Kupis, P Rudzinski, R Langfort, E Puscinska, P Bielen, P Sliwinski, T Orlowski
BACKGROUND: The analysis of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is expected to provide useful biomarkers for early diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it remains unclear whether the intense release of cfDNA into the bloodstream of NSCLC patients results from malignancy or chronic inflammatory response. Consequently, the current diagnostic utility of plasma cfDNA quantification has not been thoroughly validated in subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation. Here we assess the effect of chronic respiratory inflammation on plasma cfDNA levels and evaluate the potential clinical value of this phenomenon as an early lung cancer diagnostic tool...
July 28, 2015: British Journal of Cancer
Beth L Laube
Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery)...
June 2015: Respiratory Care
Victor Botnaru, Oxana Munteanu, Doina Rusu
Pulmonary toxicity is a rare side effect of interferon treatment with a wide spectrum of lung tissue conditions, including interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary sarcoidosis, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, pleural effusion, exacerbation of bronchial asthma, reversible pulmonary hypertension and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a case of interstitial pneumonitis in a patient treated with pegylated interferon α2-a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C virus infection, genotype 1. The case was marked by progression of the respiratory symptoms even after the withdrawn of the pegylated interferon...
January 2015: Pneumologia: Revista Societății Române de Pneumologie
Tsuyoshi Tanabe, Natsu Yamaguchi, Masayuki Okuda, Yasutaka Ishimaru, Hidekazu Takahashi
Environmental pollutants (such as diesel exhaust particles and silica) cause disorders ranging from bronchial asthma to malignant tumors. In recent years, it has been reported that some of the signaling pathways in which environmental contaminants act in vivo are associated with innate immunity. Innate immunity recognizes ligands and induces inflammation. Those ligands are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: e.g., lipopolysaccharide) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs: e.g., cholesterol crystallization or uric acid crystal)...
2015: Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Hygiene
Agnieszka Jama-Kmiecik, Magdalena Frej-Mądrzak, Jolanta Sarowska, Irena Choroszy-Król
Chlamydophila pneumoniae was taxonomically separated from strain TWAR - an abbreviation of the strain isolated from humans TW-183 (material from the eye of a child in Taiwan in 1965) and AR-39 (material from a student's throat swab with acute changes within airways in Seattle in 1983). The basis of separation of the C. pneumoniae species was the unique structure of the elementary bodies. Infection caused by C. pneumoniae is often asymptomatic (60-80% of all infections). Symptomatic infections of the upper respiratory tract relate to pharyngitis, laryngitis, sinusitis and the lower respiratory tract: bronchitis and pneumonia...
2015: Postȩpy Higieny i Medycyny Doświadczalnej
Michal Greguš, František Foret, Dagmar Kindlová, Eva Pokojová, Marek Plutinský, Martina Doubková, Zdeněk Merta, Ilona Binková, Jana Skřičková, Petr Kubáň
The analysis of an ionic profile of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection and double opposite end injection, is demonstrated. A miniature sampler made from a 2 ml syringe and an aluminium cooling cylinder was used for the fast collection of EBC (under one minute). Analysis of the collected EBC was performed in a 60 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, 60 mM L-histidine background electrolyte with 30 µM cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and 2 mM 18-crown-6 at pH 6, and excellent repeatability of migration times (RSD  <1...
June 2015: Journal of Breath Research
Maryjane Liebling, Edmundo Rubio, Susanti Ie
The benefit of prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is well documented in immunocompromised patients, particularly those with HIV and/or AIDS; therefore, guidelines dictate this as standard of care. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding those without HIV and/or AIDS who are potentially predisposed to PJP, including patients with sarcoidosis, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who may require high dose of prolonged corticosteroids for disease maintenance or to prevent relapses...
April 2015: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
Anna Häggmark, Carl Hamsten, Emil Wiklundh, Cecilia Lindskog, Cecilia Mattsson, Eni Andersson, Ingrid E Lundberg, Hans Grönlund, Jochen M Schwenk, Anders Eklund, Johan Grunewald, Peter Nilsson
RATIONALE: There is a need to further characterize the antibody repertoire in relation to sarcoidosis and potentially related autoantigens. OBJECTIVES: We investigated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum samples from patients with sarcoidosis and healthy and diseased control subjects to discover sarcoidosis-associated autoantigens. METHODS: Antigen microarrays built on 3,072 protein fragments were used to screen for IgG reactivity in 73 BAL samples from subjects with sarcoidosis, subjects with asthma, and healthy subjects...
March 1, 2015: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Esmaeil Mortaz, Hoda Gudarzi, Payam Tabarsi, Ian M Adcock, Mohamad Reza Masjedi, Hamid Reza Jamaati, Johan Garssen, Ali Akbar Velayati, Frank A Redegeld
The use of flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory has grown substantially in the past decade. Flow cytometric analysis provides a rapid qualitative and quantitative description of multiple characteristics of individual cells. For example, it is possible to detect the cell size and granularity, aspects of DNA and RNA content and the presence of cell surface and nuclear markers which are used to characterize the phenotype of single cells. Flow cytometry has been used for the immunophenotyping of a variety of specimens including whole blood, bone marrow, serous cavity fluids, (cerebrospinal fluid) CSF, urine and all types of body fluids...
February 2015: Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology
Ilias Papanikolaou, Konstantinos Kagouridis, Spyros A Papiris
Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Pulmonary manifestations (PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD...
November 15, 2014: World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology
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