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environment bacteria

T Koiava, D Gonçalves, J Palmeira, K Arobelidze, M Tediashvili, L Akhvlediani, H Ferreira
Research describing the epidemiology of antibiotic resistant microbes is vital to the proactive development of new antimicrobial agents. In the last years, CTX-M extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) have emerged worldwide and have replaced classical TEM and SHV-type ESBLs in many countries. CTX-M-15 is currently the most frequent, with a pandemic distribution, and its rapid spread is facilitated by incorporation of resistance genes in mobile genetic elements. The ESBL is efficacious in Gram-negative bacteria and thus closely associated with nosocomial environments, often colonizing the intestines, particularly in older and dependent patients...
September 2016: Georgian Medical News
Liyan Song, Shu Yang, Hongjie Liu, Jing Xu
Little is known regarding how bacterial communities assemble at landfill, as well as how the environment shapes the composition of bacterial community. In this study, up to 42 refuse samples from a large-scale landfill in China were physicochemically and phylogenetically investigated. 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based Illumina MiSeq sequencing (nine samples) revealed that representatives of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes were dominant in the refuse samples, which was similar to a previous study on landfill leachate by using 454 pyrosequencing...
October 21, 2016: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
R Balfour Sartor, Gary D Wu
Intestinal microbiota are involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and pouchitis. We review the mechanisms by which these gut bacteria, fungi, and viruses mediate mucosal homeostasis, via their composite genes (metagenome) and metabolic products (metabolome). We explain how alterations to their profiles and functions under conditions of dysbiosis contribute to inflammation and effector immune responses that mediate inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in humans and enterocolitis in mice...
October 18, 2016: Gastroenterology
Boahemaa Adu-Oppong, Andrew J Gasparrini, Gautam Dantas
Microbial communities contain diverse bacteria that play important roles in every environment. Advances in sequencing and computational methodologies over the past decades have illuminated the phylogenetic and functional diversity of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Among the activities encoded in microbiomes are the abilities to synthesize and resist small molecules, yielding antimicrobial activity. These functions are of particular interest when viewed in light of the public health emergency posed by the increase in clinical antimicrobial resistance and the dwindling antimicrobial discovery and approval pipeline, and given the intimate ecological and evolutionary relationship between antimicrobial biosynthesis and resistance...
October 21, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Ji-Feng Yang, Li-Ming Yang, Guang-Guo Ying, Cheng-Bin Liu, Li-Ying Zheng, Sheng-Lian Luo
Sulfonamide antibiotics are often detected in terrestrial and aquatic environment, but little is known about abiotic degradation of these antibiotics. In the present study, the degradation of the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfadiazine by a synthesized δ-MnO2 was investigated. The initial reaction rate of sulfadiazine oxidized by manganese dioxide increased as the solution pH decreased by weakening electrostatic attraction between sulfadiazine and MnO2 and enhancing the reduction potential of MnO2. The presence of metal ions (Mn(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+)), especially Mn(2+), decreased the initial reaction rate by competitively adsorbing and reacting with MnO2...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A, Toxic/hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
Katariina Pärnänen, Antti Karkman, Manu Tamminen, Christina Lyra, Jenni Hultman, Lars Paulin, Marko Virta
Antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment. However, only a fraction of them are mobile and able to spread to pathogenic bacteria. Until now, studying the mobility of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes has been challenging due to inadequate sensitivity and difficulties in contig assembly of metagenome based methods. We developed a new cost and labor efficient method based on Inverse PCR and long read sequencing for studying mobility potential of environmental resistance genes...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Erdmann Weronika, Kaczmarek Łukasz
To survive exposure to space conditions, organisms should have certain characteristics including a high tolerance for freezing, radiation and desiccation. The organisms with the best chance for survival under such conditions are extremophiles, like some species of Bacteria and Archea, Rotifera, several species of Nematoda, some of the arthropods and Tardigrada (water bears). There is no denying that tardigrades are one of the toughest animals on our planet and are the most unique in the extremophiles group...
October 20, 2016: Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere
Shanquan Wang, Siyuan Chen, Yu Wang, Adrian Low, Qihong Lu, Rongliang Qiu
Due to massive production and improper handling, organohalide compounds are widely distributed in subsurface environments, primarily in anoxic groundwater, soil and sediment. Compared to traditional pump-and-treat or dredging-and-disposal treatments, in situ remediation employing abiotic or biotic reductive dehalogenation represents a sustainable and economic solution for the removal of organohalide pollutants. Both nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and organohalide-respiring bacteria remove halogens through reductive dehalogenation and have been extensively studied and successfully applied for the in situ remediation of chloroethenes and other organohalide pollutants...
October 17, 2016: Biotechnology Advances
Félix LaRoche-Johnston, Caroline Monat, Benoit Cousineau
BACKGROUND: Group II introns are catalytically active RNA and mobile retroelements present in certain eukaryotic organelles, bacteria and archaea. These ribozymes self-splice from the pre-mRNA of interrupted genes and reinsert within target DNA sequences by retrohoming and retrotransposition. Evolutionary hypotheses place these retromobile elements at the origin of over half the human genome. Nevertheless, the evolution and dissemination of group II introns was found to be quite difficult to infer...
October 20, 2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Brendan W Corey, Mitchell G Thompson, Lauren E Hittle, Anna C Jacobs, Edward A Asafo-Adjei, William Huggins, Roberta J Melander, Christian Melander, Robert K Ernst, Daniel V Zurawski
Acinetobacter baumannii are gram-negative bacilli that pose a constant threat to susceptible patients because of increased resistance to multiple antibiotics and persistence in the hospital environment. After genome analysis, we discovered that A. baumannii harbor genes that share homology to an enzymatic pathway that elongates long chain fatty acids (LCFA) in fungi. Previously, 1,2,4-Triazolidine-3-thiones (T-3-Ts) were shown to inhibit hyphae production in fungi, and this same LCFA elongation pathway was implicated as the possible target...
October 20, 2016: ACS Infectious Diseases
Jason Karslake, Jeff Maltas, Peter Brumm, Kevin B Wood
The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Noelia Lopez Montero, Jost Enninga
Small GTPases of the Rab protein family control intracellular vesicular trafficking to allow their communication and maintenance. It is a common strategy for intracellular bacteria to exploit these pathways to shape their respective niches for survival. The subversion of Rabs for the generation of an intracellular environment favoring the pathogen has been described almost exclusively for intracellular bacteria that reside within bacterial containing vacuoles (BCVs). However, less is known about Rab subversion for bacteria that rupture the BCV to reach the host cytoplasm...
October 20, 2016: Small GTPases
Şivge Kurgan, Shevali Kansal, Daniel Nguyen, Danielle Stephens, Yannis Koroneos, Hatice Hasturk, Thomas E Van Dyke, Alpdogan Kantarci
BACKGROUND: Neutrophil function is critical for the initiation and progression of infecto-inflammatory diseases. Key quorum-sensing plaque bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum act as bridging species between early and late colonizer pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis as the biofilm ages and periodontal inflammation increases. This study was designed to determine the impact of different F. nucleatum strains on neutrophil function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HL-60 cells were differentiated into neutrophil-like cells and cultured with F...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Periodontology
Andrés Núñez, Guillermo Amo de Paz, Alberto Rastrojo, Ana M García, Antonio Alcamí, A Montserrat Gutiérrez-Bustillo, Diego A Moreno
The first part of this review ("Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios") describes the current knowledge on the major biological particles present in the air regarding their global distribution, concentrations, ratios and influence of meteorological factors in an attempt to provide a framework for monitoring their biodiversity and variability in such a singular environment as the atmosphere. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, pollen and fragments thereof are the most abundant microscopic biological particles in the air outdoors...
March 2016: International Microbiology: the Official Journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology
Kai Tang, Yujie Yang, Dan Lin, Shuhui Li, Wenchu Zhou, Yu Han, Keshao Liu, Nianzhi Jiao
Roseobacter clade bacteria are ubiquitous in marine environments and now thought to be significant contributors to carbon and sulfur cycling. However, only a few strains of roseobacters have been isolated from the deep-sea water column and have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we present the complete genomes of phylogentically closed related Thiobacimonas profunda JLT2016 and Pelagibaca abyssi JLT2014 isolated from deep-sea water of the Southeastern Pacific. The genome sequences showed that the two deep-sea roseobacters carry genes for versatile metabolisms with functional capabilities such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-mediated carbon fixation and inorganic sulfur oxidation...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jing Chen, Richard Dick, Jih-Gaw Lin, Ji-Dong Gu
Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process uniquely links microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. Research on n-damo bacteria progresses quickly with experimental evidences through enrichment cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting them in various natural ecosystems and engineered systems play a very important role in the discovery of their distribution, abundance, and biodiversity in the ecosystems. Important characteristics of n-damo enrichments were obtained and their key significance in microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles was investigated...
October 20, 2016: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Irfan A Butt, Bilal Aslam, Muhammad H Rasool, Humerah B Shafiq, Mohsin Khurshid, Muhammad A Aslam
To test various items in hospital environment as reservoirs of bacteria. Methods: This simple descriptive study was conducted between June and December 2014. Pediatric wards of 4 different hospitals of Faisalabad, Pakistan were selected and 8 different items per hospital were sampled (n=160). Poisson regression analysis was carried out with R software and using lme4 package. Results: There were no differences between the  hospitals regarding total number of bacterial isolates or bacterial isolates per sample source or prevalent bacterial species...
November 2016: Saudi Medical Journal
Ana C Henriques, Rui M S Azevedo, Paolo De Marco
Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a relevant intermediate of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and environmental microorganisms assume an important role in the mineralization of this compound. Several methylotrophic bacterial strains able to grow on MSA have been isolated from soil or marine water and two conserved operons, msmABCD coding for MSA monooxygenase and msmEFGH coding for a transport system, have been repeatedly encountered in most of these strains. Homologous sequences have also been amplified directly from the environment or observed in marine metagenomic data, but these showed a base composition (G + C content) very different from their counterparts from cultivated bacteria...
2016: PeerJ
Awa Diop, Saber Khelaifia, Nicholas Armstrong, Noémie Labas, Pierre-Edouard Fournier, Didier Raoult, Matthieu Million
BACKGROUND: Microbial culturomics represents an ongoing revolution in the characterization of environmental and human microbiome. METHODS: By using three media containing high salt concentration (100, 150, and 200 g/L), the halophilic microbial culturome of a commercial table salt was determined. RESULTS: Eighteen species belonging to the Terrabacteria group were isolated including eight moderate halophilic and 10 halotolerant bacteria. Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp...
2016: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Paola Sperandeo, Alessandra M Martorana, Alessandra Polissi
The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer containing a unique glycolipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in its outer leaflet. LPS molecules confer to the OM peculiar permeability barrier properties enabling Gram-negative bacteria to exclude many toxic compounds, including clinically useful antibiotics, and to survive harsh environments. Transport of LPS poses several problems to the cells due to the amphipatic nature of this molecule. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the LPS transport machinery, discuss the challenges associated with this process and present the solutions that bacterial cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS transport and assembly at the cell surface...
October 17, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
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