keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

acoustic phonetics

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29449060/the-aprosody-of-schizophrenia-computationally-derived-acoustic-phonetic-underpinnings-of-monotone-speech
#1
Michael T Compton, Anya Lunden, Sean D Cleary, Luca Pauselli, Yazeed Alolayan, Brooke Halpern, Beth Broussard, Anthony Crisafio, Leslie Capulong, Pierfrancesco Maria Balducci, Francesco Bernardini, Michael A Covington
OBJECTIVE: Acoustic phonetic methods are useful in examining some symptoms of schizophrenia; we used such methods to understand the underpinnings of aprosody. We hypothesized that, compared to controls and patients without clinically rated aprosody, patients with aprosody would exhibit reduced variability in: pitch (F0), jaw/mouth opening and tongue height (formant F1), tongue front/back position and/or lip rounding (formant F2), and intensity/loudness. METHODS: Audiorecorded speech was obtained from 98 patients (including 25 with clinically rated aprosody and 29 without) and 102 unaffected controls using five tasks: one describing a drawing, two based on spontaneous speech elicited through a question (Tasks 2 and 3), and two based on reading prose excerpts (Tasks 4 and 5)...
February 12, 2018: Schizophrenia Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29417453/non-selective-lexical-access-in-late-arabic-english-bilinguals-evidence-from-gating
#2
Sami Boudelaa
Previous research suggests that late bilinguals who speak typologically distant languages are the least likely to show evidence of non-selective lexical access processes. This study puts this claim to test by using the gating task to determine whether words beginning with speech sounds that are phonetically similar in Arabic and English (e.g., [b,d,m,n]) give rise to selective or non-selective lexical access processes in late Arabic-English bilinguals. The results show that an acoustic-phonetic input (e.g., [bæ]) that is consistent with words in Arabic (e...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29399595/the-role-of-linguistic-experience-in-the-processing-of-probabilistic-information-in-production
#3
Erin Gustafson, Matthew Goldrick
Speakers track the probability that a word will occur in a particular context and utilize this information during phonetic processing. For example, content words that have high probability within a discourse tend to be realized with reduced acoustic/articulatory properties. Such probabilistic information may influence L1 and L2 speech processing in distinct ways (reflecting differences in linguistic experience across groups and the overall difficulty of L2 speech processing). To examine this issue, L1 and L2 speakers performed a referential communication task, describing sequences of simple actions...
2018: Language, Cognition and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29383571/variation-in-the-speech-signal-as-a-window-into-the-cognitive-architecture-of-language-production
#4
Audrey Bürki
The pronunciation of words is highly variable. This variation provides crucial information about the cognitive architecture of the language production system. This review summarizes key empirical findings about variation phenomena, integrating corpus, acoustic, articulatory, and chronometric data from phonetic and psycholinguistic studies. It examines how these data constrain our current understanding of word production processes and highlights major challenges and open issues that should be addressed in future research...
January 30, 2018: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29372171/sleep-facilitates-generalisation-of-accent-adaptation-to-a-new-talker
#5
Xin Xie, F Sayako Earle, Emily B Myers
Lexically-guided phonetic retuning helps listeners adapt to the phonetic "fingerprint" of a talker. Previous findings show that listeners can generalise from one accented talker to another accented talker, but only for phonetically similar talkers. We tested whether sleep-mediated consolidation promotes generalisation across accented talkers who are not phonetically similar. Native-English participants were trained on a Mandarin-accented talker and tested on this talker and an untrained Mandarin talker. Experiment 1 showed adaptation for the trained talker and a weak transfer to the untrained talker...
2018: Language, Cognition and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29289078/native-phonological-processing-abilities-predict-post-consolidation-nonnative-contrast-learning-in-adults
#6
F Sayako Earle, Dana T Arthur
This study examined the relationship between native phonological processing ability and the learning outcome of a trained nonnative (Hindi /ɖ/ - / d̪/) contrast. Participants were perceptually trained and assessed in the evening, and reassessed early the next morning. Native phonological processing ability did not predict the learning of the nonnative contrasts on Day 1. However, after a period of post-training sleep, Blending ability predicted nonnative Discrimination performance, and Nonword Repetition predicted nonnative Identification...
December 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29285844/-mummy-keep-it-steady-phonetic-variation-shapes-word-learning-at-15-and-17-months
#7
Paola Escudero, Karen E Mulak, Jaydene Elvin, Nicole M Traynor
Fifteen-month-olds have difficulty detecting differences between novel words differing in a single vowel. Previous work showed that Australian English (AusE) infants habituated to the word-object pair DEET detected an auditory switch to DIT and DOOT in Canadian English (CanE) but not in their native AusE (Escudero et al., ). The authors speculated that this may be because the vowel inherent spectral change variation (VISC) in AusE DEET is larger than in CanE DEET. We investigated whether VISC leads to difficulty in encoding phonetic detail during early word learning, and whether this difficulty dissipates with age...
December 29, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280405/lexical-segmentation-in-artificial-word-learning-the-effects-of-converging-sublexical-cues
#8
Odile Bagou, Ulrich Hans Frauenfelder
This study examines how French listeners segment and learn new words of artificial languages varying in the presence of different combinations of sublexical segmentation cues. The first experiment investigated the contribution of three different types of sublexical cues (acoustic-phonetic, phonological and prosodic cues) to word learning. The second experiment explored how participants specifically exploited sublexical prosodic cues. Whereas complementary cues signaling word-initial and word-final boundaries had synergistic effects on word learning in the first experiment, the two manipulated prosodic cues redundantly signaling word-final boundaries in the second experiment were rank-ordered with final pitch variations being more weighted than final lengthening...
March 1, 2017: Language and Speech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280401/spectral-coefficient-analyses-of-word-initial-stop-consonant-productions-suggest-similar-anticipatory-coarticulation-for-stuttering-and-nonstuttering-adults
#9
Santosh Maruthy, Yongqiang Feng, Ludo Max
A longstanding hypothesis about the sensorimotor mechanisms underlying stuttering suggests that stuttered speech dysfluencies result from a lack of coarticulation. Formant-based measures of either the stuttered or fluent speech of children and adults who stutter have generally failed to obtain compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that these individuals differ in the timing or degree of coarticulation. Here, we used a sensitive acoustic technique-spectral coefficient analyses-that allowed us to compare stuttering and nonstuttering speakers with regard to vowel-dependent anticipatory influences as early as the onset burst of a preceding voiceless stop consonant...
March 1, 2017: Language and Speech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195437/a-revised-metric-for-calculating-acoustic-dispersion-applied-to-stop-inventories
#10
Ivy Hauser
Dispersion Theory [DT; Liljencrants and Lindblom (1972). Language 12(1), 839-862] claims that acoustically dispersed vowel inventories should be typologically common. Dispersion is often quantified using triangle area between three mean vowel formant points. This approach is problematic; it ignores distributions, which affect speech perception [Clayards, Tanenhaus, Aslin, and Jacobs (2008). Cognition 108, 804-809]. This letter proposes a revised metric for calculating dispersion which incorporates covariance...
November 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195426/acoustic-realization-of-mandarin-neutral-tone-and-tone-sandhi-in-infant-directed-speech-and-lombard-speech
#11
Ping Tang, Nan Xu Rattanasone, Ivan Yuen, Katherine Demuth
Mandarin lexical tones are modified in both infant-directed speech (IDS) and Lombard speech, resulting in tone hyperarticulation. However, it is unclear if these registers also alter contextual tones (neutral tone and tone sandhi) and if such phonetic modification might affect acquisition of these tones. This study therefore examined how neutral tone and tone sandhi are realized in IDS, and how their acoustic manifestations compare with those in Lombard speech, where the communicative needs of listeners differ...
November 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195422/a-transfer-learning-approach-to-goodness-of-pronunciation-based-automatic-mispronunciation-detection
#12
Hao Huang, Haihua Xu, Ying Hu, Gang Zhou
Goodness of pronunciation (GOP) is the most widely used method for automatic mispronunciation detection. In this paper, a transfer learning approach to GOP based mispronunciation detection when applying maximum F1-score criterion (MFC) training to deep neural network (DNN)-hidden Markov model based acoustic models is proposed. Rather than train the whole network using MFC, a DNN is used, whose hidden layers are borrowed from native speech recognition with only the softmax layer trained according to the MFC objective function...
November 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29176886/differences-in-phonetic-discrimination-stem-from-differences-in-psychoacoustic-abilities-in-learning-the-sounds-of-a-second-language-evidence-from-erp-research
#13
Yi Lin, Ruolin Fan, Lei Mo
The scientific community has been divided as to the origin of individual differences in perceiving the sounds of a second language (L2). There are two alternative explanations: a general psychoacoustic origin vs. a speech-specific one. A previous study showed that such individual variability is linked to the perceivers' speech-specific capabilities, rather than the perceivers' psychoacoustic abilities. However, we assume that the selection of participants and parameters of sound stimuli might not appropriate...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148845/speech-recovery-and-language-plasticity-can-be-facilitated-by-sensori-motor-fusion-training-in-chronic-non-fluent-aphasia-a-case-report-study
#14
Célise Haldin, Audrey Acher, Louise Kauffmann, Thomas Hueber, Emilie Cousin, Pierre Badin, Pascal Perrier, Diandra Fabre, Dominic Perennou, Olivier Detante, Assia Jaillard, Hélène Lœvenbruck, Monica Baciu
The rehabilitation of speech disorders benefits from providing visual information which may improve speech motor plans in patients. We tested the proof of concept of a rehabilitation method (Sensori-Motor Fusion, SMF; Ultraspeech player) in one post-stroke patient presenting chronic non-fluent aphasia. SMF allows visualisation by the patient of target tongue and lips movements using high-speed ultrasound and video imaging. This can improve the patient's awareness of his/her own lingual and labial movements, which can, in turn, improve the representation of articulatory movements and increase the ability to coordinate and combine articulatory gestures...
November 17, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29104329/voice-onset-time-vot-at-50-theoretical-and-practical-issues-in-measuring-voicing-distinctions
#15
Arthur S Abramson, D H Whalen
Just over fifty years ago, Lisker and Abramson proposed a straightforward measure of acoustic differences among stop consonants of different voicing categories, voice onset time (VOT). Since that time, hundreds of studies have used this method. Here, we review the original definition of VOT, propose some extensions to the definition, and discuss some problematic cases. We propose a set of terms for the most important aspects of VOT and a set of Praat labels that could provide some consistency for future cross-study analyses...
July 2017: Journal of Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103359/age-related-changes-in-temporal-and-spectral-cue-weights-in-speech
#16
Joseph C Toscano, Charissa R Lansing
Listeners weight acoustic cues in speech according to their reliability, but few studies have examined how cue weights change across the lifespan. Previous work has suggested that older adults have deficits in auditory temporal discrimination, which could affect the reliability of temporal phonetic cues, such as voice onset time (VOT), and in turn, impact speech perception in real-world listening environments. We addressed this by examining younger and older adults' use of VOT and onset F0 (a secondary phonetic cue) for voicing judgments (e...
November 1, 2017: Language and Speech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29094994/keep-listening-grammatical-context-reduces-but-does-not-eliminate-activation-of-unexpected-words
#17
Julia F Strand, Violet A Brown, Hunter E Brown, Jeffrey J Berg
To understand spoken language, listeners combine acoustic-phonetic input with expectations derived from context (Dahan & Magnuson, 2006). Eye-tracking studies on semantic context have demonstrated that the activation levels of competing lexical candidates depend on the relative strengths of the bottom-up input and top-down expectations (cf. Dahan & Tanenhaus, 2004). In the grammatical realm, however, graded effects of context on lexical competition have been predicted (Magnuson, Tanenhaus, & Aslin, 2008), but not demonstrated...
November 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29075775/acoustics-of-clear-and-noise-adapted-speech-in-children-young-and-older-adults
#18
Rajka Smiljanic, Rachael C Gilbert
Purpose: This study investigated acoustic-phonetic modifications produced in noise-adapted speech (NAS) and clear speech (CS) by children, young adults, and older adults. Method: Ten children (11-13 years of age), 10 young adults (18-29 years of age), and 10 older adults (60-84 years of age) read sentences in conversational and clear speaking style in quiet and in noise. A number of acoustic measurements were obtained. Results: NAS and CS were characterized by a decrease in speaking rate and an increase in 1-3 kHz energy, sound pressure level (SPL), vowel space area (VSA), and harmonics-to-noise ratio...
November 9, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29075677/phonetic-characteristics-of-vocalizations-during-pain
#19
Stefan Lautenbacher, Melissa Salinas-Ranneberg, Oliver Niebuhr, Miriam Kunz
INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: There have, yet, been only few attempts to phonetically characterize the vocalizations of pain, although there is wide agreement that moaning, groaning, or other nonverbal utterance can be indicative of pain. We studied the production of vowels "u," "a," "i", and "schwa" (central vowel, sounding like a darker "e" as in hesitations like "ehm")-as experimental approximations to natural vocalizations. METHODS: In 50 students vowel production and self-report ratings were assessed during painful and nonpainful heat stimulation (hot water immersion) as well as during baseline (no-stimulation)...
May 2017: Pain Reports (Baltimore, Md.)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29073618/acoustic-realization-and-inventory-size-kannada-and-malayalam-alveolar-retroflex-laterals-and-%C3%A9
#20
Marija Tabain, Alexei Kochetov
This study examines formant and spectral moment data for the apical and retroflex lateral sounds /l ɭ/ of the Dravidian languages Kannada and Malayalam, together with the rhotic /ɻ/ of Malayalam. Data are presented for 10 male speakers of each language. We find that the first spectral moment is lower for retroflex laterals than for alveolar laterals, and lower for the rhotic /ɻ/ of Malayalam than for the retroflex lateral in the same language. Differences emerge when the retroflex lateral of Kannada is compared with the same sound in Malayalam...
October 27, 2017: Phonetica
keyword
keyword
69149
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"