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Intuitive reasoning

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332130/if-you-re-a-rawlsian-how-come-you-re-so-close-to-utilitarianism-and-intuitionism-a-critique-of-daniels-s-accountability-for-reasonableness
#1
Gabriele Badano
Norman Daniels's theory of 'accountability for reasonableness' is an influential conception of fairness in healthcare resource allocation. Although it is widely thought that this theory provides a consistent extension of John Rawls's general conception of justice, this paper shows that accountability for reasonableness has important points of contact with both utilitarianism and intuitionism, the main targets of Rawls's argument. My aim is to demonstrate that its overlap with utilitarianism and intuitionism leaves accountability for reasonableness open to damaging critiques...
March 22, 2017: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329439/clinical-intuition-in-the-nursing-process-and-decision-making-a-mixed-studies-review
#2
REVIEW
Christina Melin-Johansson, Rebecca Palmqvist, Linda Rönnberg
AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To review what is characteristic of registered nurses' intuition in clinical settings, in relationships, and in the nursing process. BACKGROUND: Intuition is a controversial concept and nurses believe that there are difficulties in how they should explain their nursing actions or decisions based on intuition. Much of the evidence from the body of research indicates that nurses value their intuition in a variety of clinical settings. More information on how nurses integrate intuition as a core element in daily clinical work would contribute to an improved understanding on how they go about this...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327290/bayesian-brains-without-probabilities
#3
REVIEW
Adam N Sanborn, Nick Chater
Bayesian explanations have swept through cognitive science over the past two decades, from intuitive physics and causal learning, to perception, motor control and language. Yet people flounder with even the simplest probability questions. What explains this apparent paradox? How can a supposedly Bayesian brain reason so poorly with probabilities? In this paper, we propose a direct and perhaps unexpected answer: that Bayesian brains need not represent or calculate probabilities at all and are, indeed, poorly adapted to do so...
December 2016: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28294109/goal-recognition-based-adaptive-brain-computer-interface-for-navigating-immersive-robotic-systems
#4
Mohammad Abu-Alqumsan, Felix Ebert, Angelika Peer
OBJECTIVE: This work proposes principled strategies for self-adaptations in EEG-based Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) as a way out of the bandwidth bottleneck resulting from the considerable mismatch between the low-bandwidth interface and the bandwidth-hungry application, and a way to enable fluent and intuitive interaction in embodiment systems. The main focus is laid upon inferring the hidden target goals of users while navigating in a remote environment as a basis for possible adaptations...
March 15, 2017: Journal of Neural Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290946/medical-redeployment-in-soldiers-with-and-without-medical-deployment-waivers
#5
Corey M Cronrath, Joseph Venezia, Titus J Rund, Timothy H Cho, Nicole M Solana, Jennifer A Benincasa
BACKGROUND: Historically, disease and nonbattle injuries (DNBI) have caused more casualties during military operations than enemy combatants. Recent deployments to U.S. Central Commands (USCENTCOM) area of operation (AOR) have demonstrated similar outcomes. Intuitively, appropriate medical standards for our deploying Soldiers should result in no greater redeployments rates for those Soldiers who are waived for various medical conditions. However, no formal study has been published on redeployment rates of Soldiers with medical deployment waivers...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274905/a-learning-health-care-system-using-computer-aided-diagnosis
#6
Amos Cahan, James J Cimino
Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses...
March 8, 2017: Journal of Medical Internet Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271949/cogita-network-has-constructed-a-glossary-of-diagnostic-reasoning-terms
#7
Marie Barais, Johannes Hauswaldt, Geert-Jan Dinant, Margje van de Wiel, C F Erik Stolper, Paul Van Royen
The role of gut feelings in diagnostic reasoning is recognized by most GPs throughout Europe, and probably throughout the world. Studies on this topic have emerged from different countries but there is the risk that authors will use different terms for similar concepts. The European Expert Group on Cognitive and Interactive Processes in Diagnosis and Management in General Practice, COGITA for short, was founded in 2008 to conduct cross-border research in the area of non-analytical diagnostic reasoning. Academic GPs, PhD students, psychologists, linguists and students meet once a year to share their experiences, exchange results and initiate new studies on the topic...
December 2017: European Journal of General Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28254783/deepstack-expert-level-artificial-intelligence-in-heads-up-no-limit-poker
#8
Matej Moravčík, Martin Schmid, Neil Burch, Viliam Lisý, Dustin Morrill, Nolan Bard, Trevor Davis, Kevin Waugh, Michael Johanson, Michael Bowling
Artificial intelligence has seen several breakthroughs in recent years, with games often serving as milestones. A common feature of these games is that players have perfect information. Poker is the quintessential game of imperfect information, and a longstanding challenge problem in artificial intelligence. We introduce DeepStack, an algorithm for imperfect information settings. It combines recursive reasoning to handle information asymmetry, decomposition to focus computation on the relevant decision, and a form of intuition that is automatically learned from self-play using deep learning...
March 2, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28253515/growth-promotion-ethics-and-the-challenge-to-resist-cosmetic-endocrinology%C3%A2
#9
David B Allen
The advancement of "human growth hormone (hGH)-for-height" - increasing height attainment in children short for reasons other than GH deficiency - arose from intuitive, deep-seated assumptions about the disability of short stature, its improvement with hGH-mediated height gain, and the safety of escalating dosages of hGH in healthy children. Evidence challenging these assumptions now strengthens criticism of hGH-for-height as cosmetic endocrinology. To counter this characterization, collective acceptance of guidelines is needed that advise nontreatment of the vast majority of short children, support strategies that minimize treatment duration and dosage, and restrain enhancement of normal adult stature...
March 2, 2017: Hormone Research in Pædiatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251754/clinicians-guide-for-cue-based-transition-to-oral-feeding-in-preterm-infants-an-easy-to-use-clinical-guide
#10
Welma Lubbe
RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This article aims to provide evidence to guide multidisciplinary clinical practitioners towards successful initiation and long-term maintenance of oral feeding in preterm infants, directed by the individual infant maturity. METHOD: A comprehensive review of primary research, explorative work, existing guidelines, and evidence-based opinions regarding the transition to oral feeding in preterm infants was studied to compile this document...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238695/how-expert-clinicians-intuitively-recognize-a-medical-diagnosis
#11
REVIEW
John E Brush, Jonathan Sherbino, Geoffrey R Norman
Research has shown that expert clinicians make a medical diagnosis through a process of hypothesis generation and verification. Experts begin the diagnostic process by generating a list of diagnostic hypotheses using intuitive, non-analytical reasoning. Analytical reasoning then allows the clinician to test and verify or reject each hypothesis, leading to a diagnostic conclusion. In this paper, we focus on the initial step of hypothesis generation and review how expert clinicians use experiential knowledge to intuitively recognize a medical diagnosis...
February 24, 2017: American Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192009/%C3%A3-tude-des-strat%C3%A3-gies-de-raisonnement-causal-dans-l-estimation-de-la-probabilit%C3%A3-diagnostique-%C3%A3-travers-un-paradigme-exp%C3%A3-rimental-de-production-de-r%C3%A3-gle
#12
Jean-Louis Stilgenbauer, Jean Baratgin
The objective of this research was to test for the existence of reasoning strategies in the estimation of the diagnostic probability: P(cause|effect). In two experiments, we show that estimation of this probability can be achieved by two paths that are formally distinct. The most intuitive approach (default strategy) consists in evaluating P(cause|effect) by means of retractable deduction type reasoning based on a retractable Modus Ponens (EFFECT; if EFFECT then CAUSE is probable; thus CAUSE is probable). The second strategy consists in estimating diagnostic probability using abductive reasoning corresponding to the affirmation of consequent argument (EFFECT; if CAUSE then EFFECT is probable; thus CAUSE is probable)...
February 13, 2017: Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, Revue Canadienne de Psychologie Expérimentale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190429/the-scope-of-neurology-of-critical-illness
#13
E F M Wijdicks
Critical illness increases the probability of a neurologic complication. There are many reasons to consult a neurologist in a critically ill patient and most often it is altered alertness with no intuitive plausible explanation. Other common clinical neurologic problems facing the intensive care specialist and consulting neurologist in everyday decisions are coma following prolonged cardiovascular surgery, newly perceived motor asymmetry, seizures or other abnormal movements, and generalized muscle weakness...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28176291/the-explanatory-structure-of-unexplainable-events-causal-constraints-on-magical-reasoning
#14
Andrew Shtulman, Caitlin Morgan
A common intuition, often captured in fiction, is that some impossible events (e.g., levitating a stone) are "more impossible" than others (e.g., levitating a feather). We investigated the source of this intuition, hypothesizing that graded notions of impossibility arise from explanatory considerations logically precluded by the violation at hand but still taken into account. Studies 1-4 involved college undergraduates (n = 357), and Study 5 involved preschool-aged children (n = 32). In Studies 1 and 2, participants saw pairs of magical spells that violated one of 18 causal principles-six physical, six biological, and six psychological-and were asked to indicate which spell would be more difficult to learn...
February 7, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169230/adjuvant-treatment-for-stage-i-seminoma-why-radiotherapy-is-better-than-carboplatin
#15
REVIEW
Prahlad H Yathiraj, Krishna Sharan, Donald J Fernandes, M S Vidyasagar
Adjuvant treatment options for Stage I seminoma include active surveillance, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Active surveillance may not be ideal for the average Indian patient. Of the two accepted adjuvant therapy options, namely single-dose carboplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the retroperitoneal nodes, though it intuitively appears more appealing, a deeper review reveals the potential drawbacks of chemotherapy. This article highlights the misconceptions regarding carboplatin and provides reasons for an argument why radiotherapy is better when a patient with Stage I seminoma chooses to undergo adjuvant treatment...
October 2016: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167151/validation-of-the-intuitive-eating-scale-for-pregnant-women
#16
Sajeevika Saumali Daundasekara, Anitra Danielle Beasley, Daniel Patrick O'Connor, McClain Sampson, Daphne Hernandez, Tracey Ledoux
Pre-pregnancy maladaptive eating behaviors have predicted inadequate or excess gestational weight gain and poor dietary intake during pregnancy, but little is known about effects of pre-pregnancy adaptive eating behaviors on pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of this study was to produce a valid and reliable measure of adaptive pre-pregnancy eating behaviors for pregnant women using the Intuitive Eating Scale. Data were collected from 266 pregnant women, aged 18 and older who were attending a private prenatal clinic at Texas Children's Hospital Pavilion for Women in Houston, TX using self-administered questionnaires...
February 3, 2017: Appetite
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157389/critical-thinking-in-critical-care-five-strategies-to-improve-teaching-and-learning-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#17
Margaret M Hayes, Souvik Chatterjee, Richard M Schwartzstein
Critical thinking, the capacity to be deliberate about thinking, is increasingly the focus of undergraduate medical education, but is not commonly addressed in graduate medical education. Without critical thinking, physicians, particularly residents, are prone to cognitive errors, which can lead to diagnostic errors, especially in a high stakes environment such as the intensive care unit. Although challenging, critical thinking skills can be taught. Currently there is a paucity of data to support an educational gold standard for teaching critical thinking, but we believe that five strategies, routed in cognitive theory and our personal teaching experiences, provide an effective framework to teach critical thinking in the intensive care unit...
February 3, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146682/intuitive-cognition-and-models-of-human-automation-interaction
#18
Robert Earl Patterson
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide an analysis of the implications of the dominance of intuitive cognition in human reasoning and decision making for conceptualizing models and taxonomies of human-automation interaction, focusing on the Parasuraman et al. model and taxonomy. BACKGROUND: Knowledge about how humans reason and make decisions, which has been shown to be largely intuitive, has implications for the design of future human-machine systems. METHOD: One hundred twenty articles and books cited in other works as well as those obtained from an Internet search were reviewed...
February 2017: Human Factors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28138834/seeing-the-conflict-an-attentional-account-of-reasoning-errors
#19
André Mata, Mário B Ferreira, Andreas Voss, Tanja Kollei
In judgment and reasoning, intuition and deliberation can agree on the same responses, or they can be in conflict and suggest different responses. Incorrect responses to conflict problems have traditionally been interpreted as a sign of faulty problem-solving-an inability to solve the conflict. However, such errors might emerge earlier, from insufficient attention to the conflict. To test this attentional hypothesis, we manipulated the conflict in reasoning problems and used eye-tracking to measure attention...
January 30, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125246/the-little-albert-controversy-intuition-confirmation-bias-and-logic
#20
Nancy Digdon
This article uses the recent controversy about Little Albert's identity as an example of a fine case study of problems that can befall psychologist-historians and historians who are unaware of their tacit assumptions. Because bias and logical errors are engrained in human habits of mind, we can all succumb to them under certain conditions unless we are vigilant in guarding against them. The search for Little Albert suggests 2 persistent issues: (a) confirmation bias and (b) that overconfidence in a belief detracts from reasoning because logical errors are intuitive and seem reasonable...
January 26, 2017: History of Psychology
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