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Tumor priming

Maximilian Boesch, Sieghart Sopper, Alain G Zeimet, Daniel Reimer, Guenther Gastl, Burkhard Ludewig, Dominik Wolf
Malignancy is fuelled by distinct subsets of stem-like cells which persist under treatment and provoke drug-resistant recurrence. Eradication of these cancer stem cells has therefore become a prime objective for the development and design of novel classes of anti-cancer therapeutics with improved clinical efficacy. Here, we portray potentially clinically-relevant hallmarks of cancer stem cells and focus on their recently appreciated properties of cell variability and plasticity, both of which make them elusive targets for cancer therapies...
October 15, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Bing-Ying Xie, Ai-Wen Wu
BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease; current research relies on cancer cell lines and animal cancer models, which may not precisely imitate inner human tumors and guide clinical medicine. The purpose of our study was to explore and further improve the process of producing three-dimensional (3D) organoid model and impel the development of personalized therapy. METHODS: We subcutaneously injected surgically resected CRC tissues from a patient into BALB/c-nu mice to build patient-derived xenografts (PDXs)...
2016: Chinese Medical Journal
Matthew R Collinson-Pautz, Kevin M Slawin, Jonathan M Levitt, David M Spencer
Therapeutic DNA-based vaccines aim to prime an adaptive host immune response against tumor-associated antigens, eliminating cancer cells primarily through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell-mediated destruction. To be optimally effective, immunological adjuvants are required for the activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells responses by DNA vaccination. Here, we describe enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of an in vivo electroporation-delivered DNA vaccine by inclusion of a genetically encoded chimeric MyD88/CD40 (MC) adjuvant, which integrates both innate and adaptive immune signaling pathways...
2016: PloS One
Simone Wicki, Ursina Gurzeler, W Wei-Lynn Wong, Philipp J Jost, Daniel Bachmann, Thomas Kaufmann
Neutrophils are essential players in the first-line defense against invading bacteria and fungi. Besides its antiapoptotic role, the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family member X-linked IAP (XIAP) has been shown to regulate innate immune signaling. Whereas the role of XIAP in innate signaling pathways is derived mostly from work in macrophages and dendritic cells, it is not known if and how XIAP contributes to these pathways in neutrophils. Here we show that in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), mouse neutrophils secreted considerable amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and, in accordance with earlier reports, XIAP prevented LPS-induced hypersecretion of IL-1β also in neutrophils...
October 13, 2016: Cell Death & Disease
Mahalakshmi Ramadass, Jennifer Linda Johnson, Sergio D Catz
Neutrophil secretory proteins are mediators of systemic inflammation in infection, trauma, and cancer. In response to specific inflammatory mediators, neutrophil granules are mobilized and cargo proteins released to modulate the microenvironment of inflammatory sites and tumors. In particular, GM-CSF, a cytokine secreted by several immune, nonimmune, and tumor cells, regulates neutrophil priming and exocytosis. Whereas a comprehensive understanding of this process is necessary to design appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies, the molecular effectors regulating GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis are currently unknown...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Thomas Atwater, Christine M Cook, Pierre P Massion
The noninvasive diagnosis of lung cancer remains a formidable challenge. Although tissue diagnosis will remain the gold standard for the foreseeable future, questions pertaining to the risks and costs associated with invasive diagnostic procedures are of prime relevance. This review addresses new modalities for improving the noninvasive evaluation of suspicious lung nodules. Ultimately, the goal is to translate early diagnosis into early treatment. We discuss how biomarkers could assist in distinguishing benign from malignant nodules and aggressive from indolent tumors...
October 2016: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Olga Vornicova, Ilanit Boyango, Sari Feld, Inna Naroditsky, Olga Kazarin, Yaniv Zohar, Yariv Tiram, Neta Ilan, Ofer Ben-Izhak, Israel Vlodavsky, Gil Bar-Sela
BACKGROUND: Heparanase expression is induced in many types of cancers, including melanoma, and promotes tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. However, there is insufficient data regarding heparanase expression in the metastatic lesions that are the prime target for anti-cancer therapeutics. To that end, we examined heparanase expression in metastatic melanoma and its correlation with clinical parameters. RESULTS: Heparanase staining was detected in 88% of the samples, and was strong in 46%...
October 6, 2016: Oncotarget
Ohad Oren, B Douglas Smith
Dramatic advances have been made in the understanding of cancer over the past decade. Prime among those are better appreciation of the biology of cancer and the development of targeted therapies. Despite these improvements, however, most tumors remain refractory to anti-cancer medications and frequently recur. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs), which in some cases express markers of pluripotency (e.g., Oct-4), share many of the molecular features of normal stem cells. These cells have been hypothesised to play a role in tumor resistance and relapse...
October 11, 2016: Stem Cell Reviews
Jordan Kardos, Shengjie Chai, Lisle E Mose, Sara R Selitsky, Bhavani Krishnan, Ryoichi Saito, Michael D Iglesia, Matthew I Milowsky, Joel S Parker, William Y Kim, Benjamin G Vincent
We report the discovery of a claudin-low molecular subtype of high-grade bladder cancer that shares characteristics with the homonymous subtype of breast cancer. Claudin-low bladder tumors were enriched for multiple genetic features including increased rates of RB1, EP300, and NCOR1 mutations; increased frequency of EGFR amplification; decreased rates of FGFR3, ELF3, and KDM6A mutations; and decreased frequency of PPARG amplification. While claudin-low tumors showed the highest expression of immune gene signatures, they also demonstrated gene expression patterns consistent with those observed in active immunosuppression...
March 17, 2016: JCI Insight
David Chiron, Céline Bellanger, Antonin Papin, Benoit Tessoulin, Christelle Dousset, Sophie Maiga, Anne Moreau, Julie Esbelin, Valérie Trichet, Selina Chen-Kiang, Philippe Moreau, Cyrille Touzeau, Steven Le Gouill, Martine Amiot, Catherine Pellat-Deceunynck
Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accumulates in lymphoid organs but disseminates early on in extranodal tissues. Although proliferation remains located in lymphoid organs only, suggesting a major role of the tumor ecosystem, few studies have assessed MCL microenvironment. We therefore cocultured primary circulating MCL cells from 21 patients several weeks ex vivo with stromal or lymphoid-like (CD40L) cells to determine which interactions could support their proliferation. We showed that coculture with lymphoid-like cells, but not stromal cells, induced cell-cycle progression, which was amplified by MCL-specific cytokines (IGF-1, BAFF, IL-6, IL-10)...
October 3, 2016: Blood
Ayesha Khalid, Stefano Persano, Haifa Shen, Yuliang Zhao, Elvin Blanco, Mauro Ferrari, Joy Wolfram
The ultimate goal in the field of drug delivery is to exclusively direct therapeutic agents to pathological tissues in order to increase therapeutic efficacy and eliminate side effects. This goal is challenging due to multiple transport obstacles in the body. Strategies that improve drug transport exploit differences in the characteristics of normal and pathological tissues. Within the field of oncology, these concepts have laid the groundwork for a new discipline termed transport oncophysics. Areas covered: Efforts to improve drug biodistribution have mainly focused on nanocarriers that enable preferential accumulation of drugs in diseased tissues...
October 11, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Pierre-Louis Loyher, Juliette Rochefort, Camille Baudesson de Chanville, Pauline Hamon, Géraldine Lescaille, Chloé Bertolus, Maude Guillot-Delost, Matthew Krummel, Francois M Lemoine, Christophe Combadière, Alexandre Boissonnas
The CCL2 chemokine receptor CCR2 drives cancer by mediating recruitment of monocytes and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we extend the significance of CCR2 in this setting by identifying a new role for it in mediating recruitment of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Treg). Following tumor initiation, an expanded population of CCR2+ Tregs required CCR2 expression to traffic between draining lymph nodes (dLN) and the tumor. This Treg subset was enriched in the fraction of tumor antigen-specific cells in the dLN, where they displayed an activated immunosuppressive phenotype...
September 28, 2016: Cancer Research
S Harada, S Ehara, T Sato, T Kamiya, K Sera, S Goto, K Ishii
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Elham Behzadi, Raheleh Halabian, Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi
DNA vaccination -a third generation vaccine-is a modern approach to stimulate humoral and cellular responses against different diseases such as infectious diseases, cancer and autoimmunity. These vaccines are composed of a gene that encodes sequences of a desired protein under control of a proper (eukaryotic or viral) promoter. Immune response following DNA vaccination is influenced by the route and the dose of injection. In addition, antigen presentation following DNA administration has three different mechanisms including antigen presentation by transfected myocytes, transfection of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) and cross priming...
September 23, 2016: Microbial Pathogenesis
Marguerite R Kelher, Anirban Banerjee, Fabia Gamboni, Cameron Anderson, Christopher C Silliman
BACKGROUND: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a significant cause of mortality, especially after transfusions containing antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens. We hypothesize that a first event induces both 1) polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) to express MHC class II antigens, and 2) activation of the pulmonary endothelium, leading to PMN sequestration, so that the infusion of specific MHC class II antibodies to these antigens causes PMN-mediated acute lung injury (ALI)...
September 25, 2016: Transfusion
Elena Illiano, Massimiliano Bissa, Francesca Paolini, Carlo Zanotto, Carlo De Giuli Morghen, Rosella Franconi, Antonia Radaelli, Aldo Venuti
The therapeutic antitumor potency of a prime-boost vaccination strategy was explored, based on the mutated, nontransforming forms of the E6 (E6F47R) and E7 (E7GGG) oncogenes of Human Papilloma Virus type 16 (HPV16), fused to the Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) sequence. Previous data showed that CP fusion improves the immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens and may thus increase their efficacy. After verifying the correct expression of E6F47RCP and E7GGGCP inserted into DNA and Fowlpox virus recombinants by Western blotting and immunofluorescence, their combined use was evaluated for therapy in a pre-clinical mouse model of HPV16-related tumorigenicity...
October 2, 2016: Virus Research
Viswa Teja Colluru, Douglas G McNeel
In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo...
September 21, 2016: Oncotarget
Iliyas Khan, Avinash Gothwal, Ashok Kumar Sharma, Prashant Kesharwani, Lokesh Gupta, Arun K Iyer, Umesh Gupta
Nanotechnological advancement has become a key standard for the diagnosis and treatment of several complex disorders such as cancer by utilizing the enhanced permeability and retention effect and tumor-specific targeting. Synthesis and designing the formulation of active agents in terms of their efficient delivery is of prime importance for healthcare. The use of nanocarriers has resolved the undesirable characteristics of anticancer drugs such as low solubility and poor permeability in cells. Several types of nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed with the use of various polymers along or devoid of surface engineering for targeting tumor cells...
2016: Critical Reviews in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems
Hélio Galdino, Rodrigo Saar Gomes, Jessica Cristina Dos Santos, Lívia Lara Pessoni, Anetícia Eduarda Maldaner, Stéfanne Madalena Marques, Clayson Moura Gomes, Miriam Leandro Dorta, Milton Adriano Pelli de Oliveira, Leo A B Joosten, Fátima Ribeiro-Dias
While the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been investigated in murine models of tegumentary leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the interaction between TLRs and Leishmania sp. has not been investigated in human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of TLR4 in cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) induced by L. braziliensis, and whether the parasite alters the expression of TLR4 on monocytes/macrophages. Amastigote forms were obtained from mice lesions and PBMCs were isolated from healthy donors...
December 2016: Cytokine
Neerupma Silswal, Julia Reis, Asaf A Qureshi, Christopher Papasian, Nilofer Qureshi
The molecular basis responsible for tolerance following inflammatory response to LPS is not well-understood. We hypothesized that inflammation/tolerance in monocytes/ macrophages is dependent on the proteases of proteasome. To test our hypothesis, first, we examined the expression of different proteasome subunits in different human and mouse monocytes/macrophages. Secondly, we investigated the effect of proteasome subunits/ proteases on LPS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) during inflammation and tolerance using mouse RAW 264...
September 19, 2016: Shock
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