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Interscalene nerve catheter

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920572/home-peripheral-nerve-catheters-the-first-24-months-of-experience-at-a-children-s-hospital
#1
Andrew Gable, Candice Burrier, Jenna Stevens, Sharon Wrona, Kevin Klingele, Tarun Bhalla, David P Martin, Giorgio Veneziano, Joseph D Tobias
CONTEXT: Home peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) have become common practice for adult patients after major orthopedic surgery. However, use in pediatric patients is a recent application. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to review the demographics and outcomes of pediatric patients receiving a PNC at our institution. METHODS: This retrospective study included patients from October 2012 through October 2014 undergoing orthopedic procedures with a PNC placed for postoperative pain management...
2016: Journal of Pain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871587/peripheral-nerve-blocks-in-the-management-of-postoperative-pain-challenges-and-opportunities
#2
REVIEW
Girish Joshi, Kishor Gandhi, Nishant Shah, Jeff Gadsden, Shelby L Corman
Peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) are increasingly used as a component of multimodal analgesia and may be administered as a single injection (sPNB) or continuous infusion via a perineural catheter (cPNB). We undertook a qualitative review focusing on sPNB and cPNB with regard to benefits, risks, and opportunities for optimizing patient care. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have shown superior pain control and reductions in opioid consumption in patients receiving PNB compared with those receiving intravenous opioids in a variety of upper and lower extremity surgical procedures...
December 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27631270/a-prospective-randomized-and-controlled-study-of-interscalene-brachial-plexus-block-for-arthroscopic-shoulder-surgery-a-comparison-of-c5-and-conventional-approach-a-consort-compliant-article
#3
Hyun-Jung Shin, Hyo-Seok Na, Ah-Young Oh, Jung-Won Hwang, Byung-Gun Kim, Hee-Pyoung Park, Young-Tae Jeon, Seong-Won Min, Jung-Hee Ryu
BACKGROUND: The shoulder area is mainly innervated with the C5 and C6 nerve roots, and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is widely used for postoperative analgesia after shoulder surgery. However, it is associated with adverse effects, such as numbness and weakness in the blocked arm due to an unwanted block of the lower brachial plexus (C7-T1). We hypothesized that the C5 approach during ISB would provide postoperative analgesia while minimizing adverse events after arthroscopic shoulder surgery...
September 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27377713/current-practice-in-regional-anaesthesia-in-south-america-an-online-survey
#4
M A Corvetto, J Carmona, M I Vásquez, C Salgueiro, J Crostón, R Sosa, V Folle, F R Altermatt
OBJECTIVE: A survey was conducted in order to obtain a profile of the practice of regional anesthesia in South America, and determine the limitations of its use. METHODS: After institutional ethics committee approval, a link to an online questionnaire was sent by e-mail to anaesthesiologists in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, and Uruguay. The questionnaire was processed anonymously. RESULTS: A total of 1,260 completed questionnaires were received...
July 1, 2016: Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27258178/continuous-suprascapular-nerve-block-with-a-perineural-catheter-for-reverse-shoulder-arthroplasty-rescue-analgesia-in-a-patient-with-severe-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#5
Matthew Careskey, Ramana Naidu
Reverse open shoulder arthroplasty requires a comprehensive analgesic plan involving regional anesthesia. The commonly performed interscalene brachial plexus blockade confers a high likelihood of diaphragmatic paralysis via phrenic nerve palsy, making this option riskier in patients with limited pulmonary reserve. Continuous blockade of the suprascapular nerve, a more distal branch of the C5 and C6 nerve roots, may be a viable alternative. We report a successful case of the use of a suprascapular nerve block with continuous programmed intermittent bolus perineural analgesia in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who underwent reverse open shoulder arthroplasty...
July 15, 2016: A & A Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27239291/upper-extremity-nerve-block-how-can-benefit-duration-and-safety-be-improved-an-update
#6
REVIEW
Metha Brattwall, Pether Jildenstål, Margareta Warrén Stomberg, Jan G Jakobsson
Upper extremity blocks are useful as both sole anaesthesia and/or a supplement to general anaesthesia and they further provide effective postoperative analgesia, reducing the need for opioid analgesics. There is without doubt a renewed interest among anaesthesiologists in the interscalene, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary plexus blocks with the increasing use of ultrasound guidance. The ultrasound-guided technique visualising the needle tip and solution injected reduces the risk of side effects, accidental intravascular injection, and possibly also trauma to surrounding tissues...
2016: F1000Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27098548/phrenic-palsy-and-analgesic-quality-of-continuous-supraclavicular-vs-interscalene-plexus-blocks-after-shoulder-surgery
#7
T Wiesmann, C Feldmann, H H Müller, L Nentwig, A Beermann, B F El-Zayat, M Zoremba, H Wulf, T Steinfeldt
BACKGROUND: Hemidiaphragmatic palsy is a common consequence of the interscalene brachial plexus block. It occurs less commonly with the supraclavicular approach. Register data suggest that the analgesic quality of a supraclavicular blockade is sufficient for arthroscopic shoulder surgery, although data on the post-operative analgesic effect are lacking. METHODS: After approval by the ethics committee, patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized to receive a continuous interscalene or supraclavicular blockade...
September 2016: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26849172/an-analysis-of-1505-consecutive-patients-receiving-continuous-interscalene-analgesia-at-home-a-multicentre-prospective-safety-study
#8
MULTICENTER STUDY
M J Fredrickson, P Leightley, A Wong, M Chaddock, A Abeysekera, C Frampton
Continuous interscalene brachial plexus block has been shown to be the most effective analgesic technique following shoulder surgery; however, its use is uncommon due to logistical and safety concerns related to ambulatory administration. We prospectively studied 1505 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder surgery who received continuous interscalene analgesia at home. Catheter removal was by the patient between postoperative days two and five. There were no major complications although 27% of patients reported mild dyspnoea, 13% hoarseness and 7% dysphagia...
April 2016: Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26216250/the-effect-of-continuous-interscalene-brachial-plexus-block-with-0-125-bupivacaine-vs-0-2-ropivacaine-on-pain-relief-diaphragmatic-motility-and-ventilatory-function
#9
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Dominik W Choromanski, Pranav S Patel, Joel M Frederick, Stephen E Lemos, Elie J Chidiac
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Outpatient continuous interscalene brachial plexus blocks containing bupivacaine or ropivacaine are commonly used to control pain after shoulder surgery. Interscalene blocks cause hemidiaphragmatic paresis. Because ropivacaine preferentially blocks sensory fibers, it may cause less blockade of the phrenic nerve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 common continuous interscalene brachial plexus infusions: 0.125% bupivacaine vs 0.2% ropivacaine. The study hypothesis is that respiratory function will be less attenuated using ropivacaine than bupivacaine without affecting pain relief...
December 2015: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26175882/infusion-methods-for-continuous-interscalene-brachial-plexus-block-for-postoperative-pain-control-after-arthroscopic-rotator-cuff-repair
#10
Gyeong Jo Byeon, Sang Wook Shin, Ji Uk Yoon, Eun Jung Kim, Seung Hoon Baek, Hyun Su Ri
BACKGROUND: Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. METHODS: Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32)...
July 2015: Korean Journal of Pain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26170716/separation-of-stimulating-catheters-for-continuous-peripheral-regional-anesthesia-during-their-removal-two-case-reports-and-a-critical-appraisal-of-the-use-of-steel-coil-containing-stimulating-catheters
#11
Thomas Wiesmann, Pascal Wallot, Laura Nentwig, Alisha-Viktoria Beermann, Hinnerk Wulf, Martin Zoremba, Turfa Al-Dahna, Daphne Eschbach, Thorsten Steinfeldt
PURPOSE: Stimulating catheters are widely used for continuous peripheral nerve block techniques in regional anesthesia. The incidence of reported complications is somewhat similar to that for non-stimulating catheters. However, as many stimulating catheters contain a coiled steel wire for optimal stimulation, they may cause specific complications. CLINICAL FEATURES: In this report, we present two cases of complicated removals of stimulating catheters. During both removals, a part of the metal wire was left "decoiled" next to the supraclavicular and interscalene plexus, respectively...
2015: Local and Regional Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26064898/supplemental-interscalene-blockade-to-general-anesthesia-for-shoulder-arthroscopy-effects-on-fast-track-capability-analgesic-quality-and-lung-function
#12
Martin Zoremba, Thomas Kratz, Frank Dette, Hinnerk Wulf, Thorsten Steinfeldt, Thomas Wiesmann
BACKGROUND: After shoulder surgery performed in patients with interscalene nerve block (without general anesthesia), fast track capability and postoperative pain management in the PACU are improved compared with general anesthesia alone. However, it is not known if these evidence-based benefits still exist when the interscalene block is combined with general anesthesia. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a prospective cohort data set of 159 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy with general anesthesia alone (n = 60) or combined with an interscalene nerve block catheter (n = 99) for fast track capability time...
2015: BioMed Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25562724/ambulatory-continuous-interscalene-blocks-for-cancer-pain
#13
Michael C Gemayel, Joseph E Chidiac, Elie J Chidiac
Continuous peripheral nerve blocks are used in the management of pain following surgical procedures. They can also be used in patients with cancer-related pain, to improve sleep quality, reduce opioid requirements and their side effects. We describe two cancer patients in whom interscalene brachial plexus catheters were used on an outpatient basis, allowing them to travel, decrease their opioid use, and improve their ability to perform routine activities.
March 2015: Journal of Pain & Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25430460/effective-background-infusion-rate-of-ropivacaine-0-2-for-patient-controlled-interscalene-brachial-plexus-analgesia-after-rotator-cuff-repair-surgery
#14
Yue Wei, Min Li, Yulan Rong, Xiangyang Guo
BACKGROUND: Continuous interscalene nerve block (CISB) is considered to be the most effective method for postoperative analgesia after shoulder surgery with prolonged severe pain. This study was performed to evaluate the minimum effective background infusion rate and the effective background infusion rate of ropivacaine 0.2% for CISB after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery in 95% of patients. METHODS: Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery under general anesthesia at Peking University Third Hospital were prospectively enrolled from December 2011 to May 2012...
2014: Chinese Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25304482/interscalene-brachial-plexus-blocks-under-general-anesthesia-in-children-is-this-safe-practice-a-report-from-the-pediatric-regional-anesthesia-network-pran
#15
Andreas Taenzer, Benjamin J Walker, Adrian T Bosenberg, Elliot J Krane, Lynn D Martin, David M Polaner, Christie Wolf, Santhanam Suresh
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A practice advisory on regional anesthesia in children in 2008, published in this journal, supported the placement of regional blocks in children under general anesthesia (GA). Interscalene brachial plexus (IS) blocks were specifically excluded, based on case reports (level 3 evidence) of injury, which occurred predominantly in heavily sedated or anesthetized adult patients. Apart from case reports, there is a paucity of data that explore the safety of IS blocks placed in patients under GA, and the level of evidence available on which to base recommendations is limited...
November 2014: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24942849/ultrasound-guided-continuous-interscalene-block-the-influence-of-local-anesthetic-background-delivery-method-on-postoperative-analgesia-after-shoulder-surgery-a-randomized-trial
#16
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Mehdi Hamdani, Olivier Chassot, Roxane Fournier
BACKGROUND: Automated bolus delivery has recently been shown to reduce local anesthetic consumption and improve analgesia, compared with continuous infusion, in continuous sciatic and epidural block. However, there are few data on the influence of local anesthetic delivery method on local anesthetic consumption following interscalene blockade. This randomized, double-blind trial was designed to determine whether hourly automated perineural boluses (4 mL) of local anesthesia delivered with patient-controlled pro re nata (PRN, on demand) boluses would result in a reduction in total local anesthesia consumption during continuous interscalene blockade after shoulder surgery compared with continuous perineural infusion (4 mL/h) plus patient-controlled PRN boluses...
September 2014: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24725473/no-correlation-between-minimal-electrical-charge-at-the-tip-of-the-stimulating-catheter-and-the-efficacy-of-the-peripheral-nerve-block-catheter-for-brachial-plexus-block-a-prospective-blinded-cohort-study
#17
Karin Pw Schoenmakers, Petra Jc Heesterbeek, Nigel Tm Jack, Rudolf Stienstra
BACKGROUND: Stimulating catheters offer the possibility of delivering an electrical charge via the tip of the catheter. This may be advantageous as it allows verifying if the catheter tip is in close proximity to the target nerve, thereby increasing catheter performance. This prospective blinded cohort study was designed to investigate whether there is a correlation between the minimal electrical charge at the tip of the stimulating catheter, and the efficacy of the peripheral nerve block (PNB) catheter as determined by 24 h postoperative morphine consumption...
2014: BMC Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24480691/incidence-of-failure-of-continuous-peripheral-nerve-catheters-for-postoperative-analgesia-in-upper-extremity-surgery
#18
Zahab S Ahsan, Brendan Carvalho, Jeffrey Yao
PURPOSE: To explore the incidence of failure of continuous peripheral nerve blockade (CPNB) after upper extremity operations. METHODS: Patient data regarding postoperative CPNB were retrospectively obtained from our institution's regional anesthesia database. Documented information on the first postoperative day included pain assessment ratings (numerical verbal pain scale, patient-reported breakthrough pain upon perceived return of sensation, appearance of the catheter site, complications, time of return of sensation, day of return of sensation, residual blockade, patient satisfaction with the block, and whether patient would receive the block again)...
February 2014: Journal of Hand Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24471662/randomised-comparison-of-an-end-hole-triple-hole-and-novel-six-hole-catheter-for-continuous-interscalene-analgesia
#19
M J Fredrickson
Epidural analgesia studies and a recent continuous peripheral nerve block study suggest multi-hole perineural catheters perform better than end-hole catheters. Confounding catheter positioning issues limit interpretation of the latter study. One hundred and fifty-six patients receiving an anterolateral interscalene catheter for elective shoulder surgery were randomised to three groups: following out-of-plane ultrasound confirmation of the needle tip immediately lateral to the C5/6 roots, an end-hole (n=52), triple-hole (n=53) or six-hole (n=51) non-stimulating catheter was positioned 3 cm beyond the needle tip...
January 2014: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24456617/internet-remote-control-of-pump-settings-for-postoperative-continuous-peripheral-nerve-blocks-a-feasibility-study-in-59-patients
#20
P Macaire, M Nadhari, H Greiss, A Godwin, O Elhanfi, S Sainudeen, M Abdul, X Capdevila
INTRODUCTION: During continuous peripheral nerve blocks, infusion adjustments are essential for postoperative analgesia without side effects. Beside, physicians and nurse visits related to pump's settings and monitoring are time consuming and costly. We hypothesized that a remote control of pump's settings, by telemedicine transmission, adjusted to patients' feedbacks, is feasible and interesting in optimizing patient's postoperative pain management. METHODS: Fifty-nine ASA physical status I and II patients were included...
January 2014: Annales Françaises D'anesthèsie et de Rèanimation
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