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Axillary nerve block

Michael J Barrington, Samuel R Gledhill, Roman Kluger, Alexander L Clarke, Daniel M Wong, Henry Davidson, Rowan Thomas
BACKGROUND: Ultrasound-guided techniques improve outcomes in regional anesthesia when compared with traditional techniques; however, this assertion has not been studied with novices. The primary objective of this study was to compare sensory and motor block after axillary brachial plexus block when performed by novice trainees allocated to an ultrasound- or nerve-stimulator-guided group. A secondary objective was to compare the rates of skill acquisition between the 2 groups. METHODS: This study was a prospective, randomized, observer-blinded, 2-arm controlled trial...
September 28, 2016: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
S T Kokkalis, A F Mavrogenis, C Vottis, L Papatheodorou, P J Papagelopoulos, P N Soucacos, D G Sotereanos
Nerve wrap protectors are bioabsorbable synthetic materials made of collagen or extracellular matrix that provide a non-constricting encasement for injured peripheral nerves. They are designed to be used as an interface between the nerve and the surrounding tissue. After hydrated, they transform into a soft, pliable, nonfriable, easy to handle porous conduit. The wall of the nerve wrap has a longitudinal slit that allows to be placed around the injured nerve. Τhis article presents the surgical technique for median nerve neurolysis and nerve coverage using a collagen or an extracellular matrix nerve wrap protector in 10 patients with recurrent or persistent carpal -tunnel syndrome...
August 2016: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica
Ki Jinn Chin, Javier E Cubillos, Husni Alakkad
BACKGROUND: Regional anaesthesia comprising axillary block of the brachial plexus is a common anaesthetic technique for distal upper limb surgery. This is an update of a review first published in 2006 and previously updated in 2011 and 2013. OBJECTIVES: To compare the relative effects (benefits and harms) of three injection techniques (single, double and multiple) of axillary block of the brachial plexus for distal upper extremity surgery. We considered these effects primarily in terms of anaesthetic effectiveness; the complication rate (neurological and vascular); and pain and discomfort caused by performance of the block...
September 2, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Sébastien Bloc, Luc Mercadal, Thierry Garnier, Davy Huynh, Bernard Komly, Pascal Leclerc, Bertrand Morel, Claude Ecoffey, Gilles Dhonneur
In the axillary fossa, the musculocutaneous nerve (MC) is generally distant from the axillary artery and from the other brachial plexus nerves. In that way, MC requires a specific block. We observed that the location of MC is influenced by the position of the patient's arm and shoulder. Abduction of the shoulder significantly reduced the distance between the MC and the axillary artery. This change in the location of the MC is probably due to the moving of the nerve because of muscle rearrangements and the ability to achieve better proximity of the probe in the axillary fossae...
September 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
José R Soberón, Joseph W Crookshank, Bobby D Nossaman, Clint E Elliott, Leslie E Sisco-Wise, Scott F Duncan
PURPOSE: Limited data exist regarding the role of perineural blockade of the distal median, ulnar, and radial nerves as a primary anesthetic in patients undergoing hand surgery. We conducted a prospective and randomized pilot study to compare these techniques to brachial plexus blocks as a primary anesthetic in this patient population. METHODS: Sixty patients scheduled for hand surgery were randomized to receive either an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or axillary nerve block (brachial plexus blocks) or ultrasound-guided median, ulnar, and radial nerve blocks performed at the level of the mid to proximal forearm (forearm blocks)...
October 2016: Journal of Hand Surgery
Horst Claassen, Oliver Schmitt, Andreas Wree, Marko Schulze
INTRODUCTION: Variations in the brachial plexus are the rule rather than the exception. This fact is of special interest for the anesthetist when planning axillary block of brachial plexus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 167 cadaver arms were evaluated for variations in brachial plexus, with focus on the cords of the plexus, the loop of the median nerve, and the course of the median, musculocutaneous, ulnar, axillary and radial nerves. In addition, concomitant arterial variations were recorded...
August 6, 2016: Annals of Anatomy, Anatomischer Anzeiger: Official Organ of the Anatomische Gesellschaft
Hyun Jeong Yu, Yu Sub Jeong, Dong Hoon Lee, Kyoung Hoon Yim
The 12(th) rib syndrome is a disease that causes pain between the upper abdomen and the lower chest. It is assumed that the impinging on the nerves between the ribs causes pain in the lower chest, upper abdomen, and flank. A 74-year-old female patient visited a pain clinic complaining of pain in her back, and left chest wall at a 7 on the 0-10 Numeric Rating scale (NRS). She had a lateral fixation at T12-L2, 6 years earlier. After the operation, she had multiple osteoporotic compression fractures. When the spine was bent, the patient complained about a sharp pain in the left mid-axillary line and radiating pain toward the abdomen...
July 2016: Korean Journal of Pain
Emiko Chiba, Kohei Hamamoto, Michio Nagashima, Katsuhiko Matsuura, Tomohisa Okochi, Keisuke Tanno, Osamu Tanaka
PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm...
October 2016: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology
Shalini Dhir, Rakesh V Sondekoppam, Ranjita Sharma, Sugantha Ganapathy, George S Athwal
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of combined suprascapular and axillary nerve block (SSAX) with interscalene block (ISB) after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Our hypothesis was that ultrasound-guided SSAX would provide postoperative analgesia equivalent to ISB. METHODS: Sixty adult patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery received either SSAX or ISB prior to general anesthesia, in a randomized fashion...
September 2016: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
Jin-Soo Kim, Jeonghun Lee, Euy-Young Soh, Hyoeun Ahn, Sang Eon Oh, Jung-Dong Lee, Han Bum Joe
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Single-incision transaxillary robotic thyroidectomy (START) requires substantial tissue disruption, which produces moderate-to-severe pain in the axilla and neck areas during the early postoperative period. This study aimed to investigate the analgesic effects of ultrasound-guided serratus-intercostal plane blocks and intermediate cervical plexus blocks (CPBs) on the early postoperative pain after START. METHODS: We randomized 22 patients to undergo either ultrasound-guided serratus-intercostal plane and intermediate CPBs (the block group, n = 11) or to not undergo any block (the control group, n = 11)...
September 2016: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
M A Corvetto, J Carmona, M I Vásquez, C Salgueiro, J Crostón, R Sosa, V Folle, F R Altermatt
OBJECTIVE: A survey was conducted in order to obtain a profile of the practice of regional anesthesia in South America, and determine the limitations of its use. METHODS: After institutional ethics committee approval, a link to an online questionnaire was sent by e-mail to anaesthesiologists in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, and Uruguay. The questionnaire was processed anonymously. RESULTS: A total of 1,260 completed questionnaires were received...
July 1, 2016: Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación
R Fuzier, S Lammens, L Becuwe, B Bataille, J C Sleth, D Jochum, E Boselli
A cross-sectional survey study on French practice in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia was carried out. A questionnaire (demographic data, assessment of the likely benefits of ultrasonography, and its use in daily practice: blocks and hygiene) was emailed to all members of the French-speaking association of anesthesiologists involved in regional anesthesia. The questionnaire was filled out and returned by 634 experienced anesthesiologists. An ultrasound machine was available in 94% of cases. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia has become the gold standard technique for three-quarters of responders...
2016: Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica
Metha Brattwall, Pether Jildenstål, Margareta Warrén Stomberg, Jan G Jakobsson
Upper extremity blocks are useful as both sole anaesthesia and/or a supplement to general anaesthesia and they further provide effective postoperative analgesia, reducing the need for opioid analgesics. There is without doubt a renewed interest among anaesthesiologists in the interscalene, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary plexus blocks with the increasing use of ultrasound guidance. The ultrasound-guided technique visualising the needle tip and solution injected reduces the risk of side effects, accidental intravascular injection, and possibly also trauma to surrounding tissues...
2016: F1000Research
Hiroshi Satake, Naomi Hanaka, Ryusuke Honma, Tadayoshi Watanabe, Shigeru Inoue, Yumiko Kanauchi, Yoshihiro Kato, Taku Nakajima, Daisuke Sato, Jun Eto, Masahiro Maruyama, Yasushi Naganuma, Junya Sasaki, Shuji Toyono, Mikio Harada, Daisuke Ishigaki, Masatoshi Takahara, Michiaki Takagi
The current study investigated the incidence of complications after surgery for distal radial fractures. This multicenter retrospective study was conducted at 11 institutions. A total of 824 patients who had distal radius fractures that were treated surgically between January 2010 and August 2012 were identified. The study patients were older than 18 years and were observed for at least 12 weeks after surgery for distal radius fractures with a volar locking plate. Sex, age, fracture type according to AO classification, implants, wrist range of motion, grip strength, fracture consolidation rate, and complications were studied...
September 1, 2016: Orthopedics
Rodrigo Mencalha, Carlos Augusto Dos Santos Sousa, Orlando Costa, Marcelo Abidu-Figueiredo
PURPOSE: To update the gross and sonographic anatomy and propose landmarks to perform ultrasound-guided (US-guided) axillary brachial plexus block (BPB) in rabbits. METHODS: Forty New Zeeland's rabbit (NZR) cadavers were dissected and the nerves were trimmed, identified, measured, and photographed. Additionally, in twenty NZRs, sonographic images of brachial plexus (BP) were performed through a simple-resolution ultrasound device. The US-guided block was achieved through a minimum volume of lidocaine necessary to surround the BP roots...
April 2016: Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira
Anatoli Stav, Leonid Reytman, Michael-Yohay Stav, Isaak Portnoy, Alexander Kantarovsky, Offer Galili, Shmuel Luboshitz, Roger Sevi, Ahud Sternberg
OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. METHODS: This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study...
2016: Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal
Masaru Kikuchi, Shunsuke Takaki, Takeshi Nomura, Takahisa Goto
BACKGROUND: Pectoral nerve block (PECS block) is first reported by Blanco et al, and mainly used for analgesia for breast surgery in Japan. However, the spread of PECS block is unclear. METHODS: Ultrasound guided PECS I and II blocks were performed in a cadaver, and the cadaver was dissected for evaluation of the spread of coloring matter. RESULTS: The coloring matter by PECS I block was spread to the axillary region between the major and minor pectoral muscles, while PECS II block remained over the fascia of the serratus muscle from mid-clavicular line to middle axillary line...
March 2016: Masui. the Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology
Anju Ghai, Teshi Kaushik, Zile Singh Kundu, Sarthak Wadhera, Raman Wadhera
BACKGROUND: Ultrasound imaging is an ideal tool for stellate ganglion block (SGB) due to clarity, portability, lack of radiation, and low cost. Ultrasound guided anterior approach requires the application of pressure to the anterior neck and is associated with more risk of injury to inferior thyroid artery, vertebral artery, and esophagus. The lateral approach does not interfere with nerve or vascular structures. Blockade at the C6 vertebral level results in more successful sympathetic blockade of the head and neck with less sympathetic blockade of the upper extremity compared to sympathetic blockade at C7 vertebral level, which produces successful sympathetic blockade of upper extremity...
April 2016: Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia
A Chuan, S Thillainathan, P L Graham, B Jolly, D M Wong, N Smith, M J Barrington
The Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) form is used as a workplace-based assessment tool in the current Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists curriculum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of DOPS when used to score trainees performing ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia. Reliability of an assessment tool is defined as the reproducibility of scores given by different assessors viewing the same trainee. Forty-nine anaesthetists were recruited to score two scripted videos of trainees performing a popliteal sciatic nerve block and an axillary brachial plexus block...
March 2016: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
Luis Eduardo Silveira Martins, Leonardo Henrique Cunha Ferraro, Alexandre Takeda, Masashi Munechika, Maria Angela Tardelli
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The advent of ultrasound has brought many benefits to peripheral nerve blocks. It includes both safety and effectiveness, given the possibility of visualizing the neurovascular structures and the needle during the procedure. Despite these benefits, there is no consensus in the literature on the use of this technique in anticoagulated patients or with other coagulation disorders. Moreover, peripheral blocks vary in depth, spreadability, and possibility of local compression...
March 22, 2016: Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia
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