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Central venous catheters hemodialysis

Afsha Aurshina, Anil Hingorani, Ahmad Alsheekh, Pavel Kibrik, Natalie Marks, Enrico Ascher
OBJECTIVE: It has been a widely accepted practice that a previous placed pacemaker, automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators, or central line can be a contraindication to placing a hemodialysis catheter in the ipsilateral jugular vein. Fear of dislodging pacing wires, tunneling close to the battery site or causing venous obstruction has been a concern for surgeons and interventionalists alike. We suggest that this phobia may be unfounded. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of patients in whom hemodialysis catheters were placed over a period of 10 years...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Xiang-Yang Li, Hai-Yan He, Pearl Pai
Central venous catheterization can be challenging in patients that had undergone repeated catheter placements. Ultrasound scan may overlook venous stenosis which is better visualized using venography. The use of venography should be considered to assess for venous stenosis or vascular anomalies in individuals with multiple catheterizations or in close proximity to cancer.
March 2018: Clinical Case Reports
Jinguo Wang, Feng Liu, Shunshun Liu, Na Wang
BACKGROUND The complication rate of central venous catheterization ranges from 4% to 35%. Brachial plexus injury can occur, mostly on the same side as the catheterization, without affecting the contralateral brachial plexus. CASE REPORT A 71-year-old woman received placement of a vein hemodialysis catheter via right internal jugular vein. Five days after the cannulation, she complained of contralateral burning pain and numbness at the ulnar side of her left forearm. On the next day, the pain increased and extended to her left shoulder girdle and whole left arm, despite use of analgesics...
March 13, 2018: American Journal of Case Reports
V Hoerr, M Franz, M W Pletz, M Diab, S Niemann, C Faber, T Doenst, P C Schulze, S Deinhardt-Emmer, B Löffler
Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease, caused by septic vegetations and inflammatory foci on the surface of the endothelium and the valves. Due to its complex and often indecisive presentation the mortality rate is still about 30%. Most frequently bacterial microorganisms entering the bloodstream are the underlying origin of the intracardiac infection. While the disease was primarily restricted to younger patients suffering from rheumatic heart streptococci infections, new at risk categories for Staphylococcus (S...
February 21, 2018: International Journal of Medical Microbiology: IJMM
Eric Pillado, Mina Behdad, Russell Williams, Samuel E Wilson
INTRODUCTION: Construction of radiocephalic AV fistula (RC- AVF) results in successful hemodialysis (HD) in approximately 40 percent of ESRD patients. We investigated whether RC-AVF flow measured by ultrasound 30 days postoperative predicted successful HD. METHODS: In this prospective study color Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used to measure cephalic vein outflow volume at three forearm sites one and three months postoperative. RESULTS: Of 45 consecutive patients screened for feasibility of RC-AVF by physical exam and US arterial and vein mapping, 41 were considered suitable for construction of RC-AVF...
February 22, 2018: Annals of Vascular Surgery
Tracy N Zembles, Linda S Flannery, Anna R Huppler
PURPOSE: The development and implementation of an antimicrobial lock therapy guideline at a large pediatric hospital are described. SUMMARY: Central venous access devices (CVADs) are essential in the medical management of patients requiring long-term total parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or hemodialysis. However, the use of a CVAD carries a significant risk of the development of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Antimicrobial lock therapy is indicated for patients with CLABSIs who have no signs of exit site or tunnel infection and for whom catheter salvage is a goal...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
Steven M Brunelli, David B Van Wyck, Levi Njord, Robert J Ziebol, Laurie E Lynch, Douglas P Killion
Central venous catheters (CVCs) contribute disproportionately to bloodstream infection (BSI) and, by extension, to infection-related hospitalization, mortality, and health care costs in patients undergoing dialysis. Recent product advancements may reduce BSIs, but a sufficiently powered comparative-effectiveness study is needed to facilitate evidence-based patient care decisions. In a 13-month, prospective, cluster-randomized, open-label trial, we compared BSI rates in facilities using ClearGuard HD antimicrobial barrier caps (ClearGuard group) with those in facilities using Tego hemodialysis connectors plus Curos disinfecting caps (Tego+Curos group)...
February 22, 2018: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
J M Fichelle, V Baissas, S Salvi, J N Fabiani
Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis or thrombosis is a well-known complication of central venous catheterization for endocavitary treatments, hemodialysis, or chemotherapy. In cancer patients, these SVC lesions are often symptomatic due to intimal damage and chemotherapy toxicity. We report our experience with six patients treated between 2007 and 2012 via an endovascular approach (n=5) or a direct surgical approach (n=1). All patients had SVC syndrome with facial edema, headache and upper limb edema. In three cases, the catheter was in place when the clinical symptoms occurred...
February 2018: Journal de Médecine Vasculaire
Vedran Premuzic, Lea Katalinic, Marijan Pasalic, Hrvoje Jurin
Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumothorax. Thorough diagnostics outruled immediate life-threatening conditions, such as myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism...
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia
Fernando Chaves, José Garnacho-Montero, José Luis Del Pozo, Emilio Bouza, José Antonio Capdevila, Marina de Cueto, M Ángeles Domínguez, Jaime Esteban, Nuria Fernández-Hidalgo, Marta Fernández Sampedro, Jesús Fortún, María Guembe, Leonardo Lorente, Jose Ramón Paño, Paula Ramírez, Miguel Salavert, Miguel Sánchez, Jordi Vallés
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) constitute an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. The aim of these guidelines is to provide updated recommendations for the diagnosis and management of CRBSI in adults. Prevention of CRBSI is excluded. Experts in the field were designated by the two participating Societies (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias)...
February 2018: Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica
F Chaves, J Garnacho-Montero, J L Del Pozo, E Bouza, J A Capdevila, M de Cueto, M Á Domínguez, J Esteban, N Fernández-Hidalgo, M Fernández Sampedro, J Fortún, M Guembe, L Lorente, J R Paño, P Ramírez, M Salavert, M Sánchez, J Vallés
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) constitute an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. The aim of these guidelines is to provide updated recommendations for the diagnosis and management of CRBSI in adults. Prevention of CRBSI is excluded. Experts in the field were designated by the two participating Societies (the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology and [SEIMC] and the Spanish Society of Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine and Coronary Units [SEMICYUC])...
January 2018: Medicina Intensiva
K Shivanand Nayak, Sreepada V Subhramanyam, Navva Pavankumar, Sinoj Antony, M A Sarfaraz Khan
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Initiating renal replacement therapy in late referred patients with central venous catheter (CVC) hemodialysis (HD) causes serious complications. In urgent start peritoneal dialysis, initiating peritoneal dialysis (PD) within 14 days of catheter insertion still needs HD with CVC. We initiated Emergent start PD (ESPD) with Automated PD (APD) at our center within 48 h from the time of presentation. METHODS: A prospective, case-controlled, intention-to-treat study with 56 patients was conducted between March 2016 and August 2017...
January 30, 2018: Blood Purification
Eric Pillado, Abraham Korn, Christian de Virgilio, Nina Bowens
Prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs) for hemodialysis (HD) is associated with greater morbidity and mortality when compared with autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVF). The objective was to assess compliance with CVC guidelines in adults referred for hemoaccess at a county teaching hospital. Out of 256 patients, 172 (67.2%) were male, with a mean age of 50.0 ± 12.4 years. Overall 62.5 per cent initiated dialysis via CVC. Patients were divided into two groups (those with CVC (62.5%) and those without (37...
October 1, 2017: American Surgeon
Januvi Jegatheswaran, Jeffrey Warren, Deborah Zimmerman
Patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) are often required to switch to hemodialysis (HD) temporarily when they develop abdominal wall hernias and dialysate leaks, peritonitis or undergo thoracic or abdominal surgeries. There are significant risks associated with incident hemodialysis including possible central venous catheter infections, thrombosis, and need for invasive procedures. Therefore, strategies to avoid temporary transfer to hemodialysis are desirable. The increased intra-abdominal pressure associated with PD is largely responsible for the issues requiring withholding PD...
January 30, 2018: Seminars in Dialysis
Ying Zhang, Xianglei Kong, Lijun Tang, Yong Wei, Dongmei Xu
Arteriovenous fistula is the preferred option for vascular access in hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess different follow-up methods for hemodialysis patients in our hemodialysis center in China. A cohort of 124 patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease was recruited and double-blind randomly assigned into two groups. Patients in Group A received phone calls to schedule their next consultation a week in advance. Patients in Group B scheduled their next appointment at the end of each visit...
January 19, 2018: Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis
Mayra Gonçalves Menegueti, Natália Cristina Betoni, Fernando Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Elen Almeida Romão
INTRODUCTION: Bloodstream infections are the second most common cause of death among patients on hemodialysis. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of and risk factors associated with central venous catheter-related infections in patients undergoing hemodialysis, and to identify and characterize the type and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the primary microorganisms isolated during one year of follow-up. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in 2014 in a hemodialysis referral center...
November 2017: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical
Marcela Lara Mendes, Camila Albuquerque Alves, Edwa Maria Bucuvic, Dayana Bitencourt Dias, Daniela Ponce
Most patients with stage 5 CKD start RRT of unplanned manner. Unplanned dialysis, also known as urgent start, may be defined as hemodialysis (HD) started without permanent vascular access, i.e., using a central venous catheter (CVC), or as peritoneal dialysis (PD) started within seven days after implantation of the catheter, without family training. Although few studies have evaluated the PD as an immediate treatment option for patients starting urgent RRT, theirs results suggest that it is a feasible and safe alternative, with infectious complications and survival similar to patients treated with unplanned HD...
October 2017: Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia: ʹorgão Oficial de Sociedades Brasileira e Latino-Americana de Nefrologia
Basile Kerleroux, Jeremy Pasco, Mathieu Dupuis, Marine Eustache, Ahmed Lemrabott, Charlotte Jouzel, Catherine Albert, Kevin Janot, Baptiste Morel, André Pruna
PURPOSE: To investigate a new noninvasive method to assess central venous pressure (CVP) in hemodialysis patients, based on the ultrasonographic measurement of the collapsing point of the internal jugular vein (CVPni). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this preliminary, noninterventional, single center study, we enrolled 22 dialyzed patients with an indwelling jugular catheter. CVPni was compared to the gold-standard invasive measurement of CVP using the central venous catheter (CVPi)...
January 4, 2018: Journal of Clinical Ultrasound: JCU
Ken J Park, Eric S Johnson, Ning Smith, David M Mosen, Micah L Thorp
CONTEXT: Central venous catheter (CVC) use is associated with increased mortality and complications in hemodialysis recipients. Although prevalent CVC use has decreased, incident use remains high. OBJECTIVE: To examine characteristics associated with CVC use at initial dialysis, specifically looking at proteinuria as a predictor of interest. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort of 918 hemodialysis recipients from Kaiser Permanente Northwest who started hemodialysis from January 1, 2004, to January 1, 2014...
2017: Permanente Journal
Wen-Yi Li, Yi-Cheng Wang, Shang-Jyh Hwang, Shih-Hua Lin, Kwan-Dun Wu, Yung-Ming Chen
BACKGROUND: The clinical consequences of starting chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) after emergent dialysis via a temporary hemodialysis (HD) catheter has rarely been evaluated within a full spectrum of treated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated the longer-term outcomes of patients undergoing emergent-start PD in comparison with that of other practices of PD or HD in a prospective cohort of new-onset ESRD. METHODS: This was a 2-year prospective observational study...
December 11, 2017: BMC Nephrology
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