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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29924346/assessing-prevalence-of-urinary-incontinence-in-scottish-fitness-instructors-and-experience-of-teaching-pelvic-floor-muscle-exercises-an-online-survey
#1
Kate Stephen, Hugo van Woerden, Sandra MacRury
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence in fitness instructors, experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), and attitudes to incorporating such exercises into classes. Method: An online survey was undertaken of fitness instructors working in Scotland based on the Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI). Results: The survey was at least partially completed by 106, of whom 73...
June 18, 2018: Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29923602/mechanical-oscillations-superimposed-on-the-pelvic-floor-muscles-during-kegel-exercises-reduce-urine-leakage-in-women-suffering-from-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-prospective-cohort-study-with-a-two-year-follow-up
#2
Ingard Nilsen, Guillermo Rebolledo, Ganesh Acharya, Gunnar Leivseth
INTRODUCTION: New methods of conservative treatment of female stress urinary continence are needed. We investigated whether superimposed vibration mechanosignals during Kegel exercises could reduce the amount of urinary leakage after four and six weeks of training. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty women with stress urinary continence were included in this prospective cohort study. Vibration mechanosignals were superimposed during Kegel exercises using an intravaginal device...
June 20, 2018: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29914808/pelvic-floor-muscle-training-increases-pelvic-floor-muscle-strength-more-in-post-menopausal-women-who-are-not-using-hormone-therapy-than-in-women-who-are-using-hormone-therapy-a-randomised-trial
#3
Flávia Ignácio Antônio, Robert D Herbert, Kari Bø, Ana Carolina Japur Sá Rosa-E-Silva, Lúcia Alves Silva Lara, Maira de Menezes Franco, Cristine Homsi Jorge Ferreira
QUESTION: Are there differences in the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary incontinence symptoms in postmenopausal women who are and are not using hormone therapy? DESIGN: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, blinded assessors, and intention-to-treat analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-nine postmenopausal women, 38 of whom were using daily systemic oestrogen/progestogen therapy...
June 15, 2018: Journal of Physiotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29885711/nonsurgical-treatment-options-for-women-with-pelvic-organ-prolapse
#4
REVIEW
Christina Tso, Wah Lee, Tammy Austin-Ketch, Harvey Winkler, Bruce Zitkus
Pelvic organ prolapse is a medical condition that can cause pelvic discomfort as well as urinary and bowel complications. Approximately 25% of women in the United States and roughly 50% of women worldwide develop this condition. Although pelvic organ prolapse is usually a non-life-threatening condition, it can result in decreased self-confidence and negative body image. Physical and emotional sequelae can limit physical activity, and decreased productivity could be a consequence. Evidence from the literature indicates that pessary use and pelvic floor muscle training are effective options when conservative treatment is desired...
June 2018: Nursing for Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29876920/pelvic-floor-dysfunction-in-the-immediate-puerperium-and-1-month-and-3-months-after-vaginal-or-cesarean-delivery
#5
Cássia Colla, Luciana L Paiva, Lia Ferla, Maria J B Trento, Isadora M P de Vargas, Bianca A Dos Santos, Charles F Ferreira, José G L Ramos
OBJECTIVE: To identify and assess postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) between vaginal delivery, elective cesarean delivery (ECD), and intrapartum cesarean delivery (ICD). METHODS: The present prospective observational study included women aged at least 18 years with no history of pelvic surgery or lower urinary tract malformation, and who had not undergone pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training in the preceding 12 months, who underwent delivery at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, Brazil between August 1, 2016, and May 31, 2017...
June 7, 2018: International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29844662/the-impact-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-on-the-quality-of-life-of-women-with-urinary-incontinence-a-systematic-literature-review
#6
REVIEW
Agnieszka Radzimińska, Agnieszka Strączyńska, Magdalena Weber-Rajek, Hanna Styczyńska, Katarzyna Strojek, Zuzanna Piekorz
Purpose: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) in women, with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients' quality of life (QoL). Methods: The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (articles only in English, 1990-2017). Search terms were as follows: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, pelvic floor exercises, quality of life...
2018: Clinical Interventions in Aging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29797360/strategies-to-assist-uptake-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-people-with-urinary-incontinence-a-clinician-viewpoint
#7
Susan C Slade, Jean Hay-Smith, Sally Mastwyk, Meg E Morris, Helena Frawley
AIMS: The experiences and information needs of clinicians who use pelvic floor muscle training to manage urinary incontinence were explored. METHODS: Qualitative methods were used to conduct thematic analysis of data collected from clinician focus groups and interviews. Participants were registered physiotherapists and continence nurses in Melbourne, Australia. Recruitment was through a combination of purposive and "snowball" sampling and continued until data adequacy was reached...
May 24, 2018: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29781068/pelvic-floor-muscle-training-with-or-without-tibial-nerve-stimulation-and-lifestyle-changes-have-comparable-effects-on-the-overactive-bladder-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#8
Lina Bykoviene, Raimondas Kubilius, Rosita Aniuliene, Egle Bartuseviciene, Arnoldas Bartusevicius
PURPOSE: To compare effects of transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). MATERIAL AND METHODS: We randomized 67 women ? 18 years with OAB to three parallel groups: group I (n = 22) received life-style recommendations (LSR) only; group II (n = 24) had LSR + PFMT and group III (n = 21) had LSR + PFMT + TPTNS. Urgency, evaluated by a 3-day voiding diary before treatment and six weeks later, was the main outcome measure...
May 21, 2018: Urology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753829/the-role-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-in-the-conservative-and-surgical-management-of-female-stress-urinary-incontinence-does-the-strength-of-the-pelvic-floor-muscles-matter
#9
REVIEW
Anna Maria Lasak, Marjorie Jean-Michel, Phuong Uyen Le, Roshni Durgam, Jessica Harroche
The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth overview of the role of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the management of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The definition, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of SUI are described. We review the anatomy of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and the importance of pelvic floor muscle strength in maintaining urinary continence and establishing normal voiding function. A brief description of the surgical options currently available for SUI and the existing data regarding the role of perioperative PFMT for SUI are included...
May 10, 2018: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29733699/ankle-positions-potentially-facilitating-greater-maximal-contraction-of-pelvic-floor-muscles-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#10
Priya Kannan, Stanley Winser, Ravindra Goonetilleke, Gladys Cheing
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of ankle positions on pelvic floor muscles in women. METHODS: Multiple databases were searched from inception-July 2017. Study quality was rated using the grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation system and the "threats to validity tool". RESULTS: Four studies were eligible for inclusion. Meta-analysis revealed significantly greater resting activity of pelvic floor muscles in neutral ankle position (-1...
May 7, 2018: Disability and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29727372/the-effect-of-commonly-performed-exercises-on-the-levator-hiatus-area-and-the-length-and-strength-of-pelvic-floor-muscles-in-postpartum-women
#11
Lauren N Siff, Audra J Hill, Samantha J Walters, Ginny Walters, Mark D Walters
OBJECTIVE: The aim oft his study was to compare the effects of 10 common exercises to traditional pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions (Kegel) on levator hiatus (LH) area and PFM length and strength. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 15 healthy postpartum women. Ten exercises were studied. These were common variations of leg, core, and back exercises used in yoga, Pilates, strength training, and physical therapy. Each participant performed all 10 exercises at a single visit in 2 examination settings: transperineal ultrasound and perineometry...
May 2, 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29706703/influence-of-adequate-pelvic-floor-muscle-contraction-on-the-movement-of-the-coccyx-during-pelvic-floor-muscle-training
#12
Akiko Fujisaki, Miwa Shigeta, Misa Shimoinaba, Yasukuni Yoshimura
[Purpose] Pelvic floor muscle training is a first-line therapy for female stress urinary incontinence. Previous studies have suggested that the coccyx tip moves ventrally and cranially during pelvic floor muscle contraction. The study aimed to elucidate the influence of adequate pelvic floor muscle contraction on coccyx movement. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-three females (57 patients with stress urinary incontinence and additional 6 healthy volunteers) were enrolled. Using magnetic resonance imaging, coccyx movement was evaluated during pelvic floor muscle contraction and strain...
April 2018: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705985/systematic-review-of-pelvic-floor-interventions-during-pregnancy
#13
REVIEW
Lucas Schreiner, Isabel Crivelatti, Julia M de Oliveira, Christiana C Nygaard, Thais G Dos Santos
BACKGROUND: Pelvic floor interventions during pregnancy could reduce the impact of pregnancy and delivery on the pelvic floor. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of pelvic floor interventions during pregnancy on childbirth-related and pelvic floor parameters. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed, Embase, and LILACS were searched for reports published during between 1990 and 2016 in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. The search terms were "pregnancy," "pelvic floor muscle training," and related terms...
April 28, 2018: International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29702450/medium-term-follow-up-after-supervised-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-patients-with-anterior-vaginal-wall-prolapse
#14
Mifuka Ouchi, Takeya Kitta, Yukiko Kanno, Kimihiko Moriya, Shigeyuki Suzuki, Nobuo Shinohara, Kumiko Kato
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine changes in quality of life, urogenital symptoms, and adherence to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in the medium term. STUDY DESIGN: The present study conducted a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study design. Of 29 participants in 4-month supervised PFMT, 27 completed all assessments in a follow-up study. Twenty subjects were included in final analysis except 7 participants who underwent surgery during follow-up...
June 2018: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29696209/supervised-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-versus-attention-control-massage-treatment-in-patients-with-faecal-incontinence-statistical-analysis-plan-for-a-randomised-controlled-trial
#15
Anja Ussing, Inge Dahn, Ulla Due, Michael Sørensen, Janne Petersen, Thomas Bandholm
Introduction: Faecal incontinence affects approximately 8-9% of the adult population. The condition is surrounded by taboo; it can have a devastating impact on quality of life and lead to major limitations in daily life. Pelvic floor muscle training in combination with information and fibre supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment and compared this to an attention-control massage treatment including conservative treatment...
December 2017: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29687914/design-of-programs-to-train-pelvic-floor-muscles-in-men-with-urinary-dysfunction-systematic-review
#16
REVIEW
Leanne M Hall, Rafeef Aljuraifani, Paul W Hodges
AIMS: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a first line conservative treatment for men with urinary dysfunction, but reports of its efficacy are variable. This study aimed to systematically review the content of PFMT programs used for urinary dysfunction in men. METHODS: Electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane, PEDro) were searched for studies that used PFMT in the treatment of adult men with urinary dysfunction. Details of PFMT treatment sessions and home exercise protocols were extracted...
April 24, 2018: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29677302/effect-of-uterosacral-ligament-suspension-vs-sacrospinous-ligament-fixation-with-or-without-perioperative-behavioral-therapy-for-pelvic-organ-vaginal-prolapse-on-surgical-outcomes-and-prolapse-symptoms-at-5-years-in-the-optimal-randomized-clinical-trial
#17
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
J Eric Jelovsek, Matthew D Barber, Linda Brubaker, Peggy Norton, Marie Gantz, Holly E Richter, Alison Weidner, Shawn Menefee, Joseph Schaffer, Norma Pugh, Susan Meikle
Importance: Uterosacral ligament suspension (ULS) and sacrospinous ligament fixation (SSLF) are commonly performed pelvic organ prolapse procedures despite a lack of long-term efficacy data. Objective: To compare outcomes in women randomized to (1) ULS or SSLF and (2) usual care or perioperative behavioral therapy and pelvic floor muscle training (BPMT) for vaginal apical prolapse. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 2 × 2 factorial randomized clinical trial was conducted at 9 US medical centers...
April 17, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672906/do-brain-structural-abnormalities-differentiate-separate-forms-of-urgency-urinary-incontinence
#18
Becky D Clarkson, Derek Griffiths, Neil M Resnick
AIMS: Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a major problem for seniors. The underlying mechanisms of disease and therapy are unknown. We sought structural brain abnormalities that might underlie the functional differences previously observed by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in UUI patients versus controls, or among UUI responders versus non-responders to therapy-and thereby reveal potential disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets. METHODS: Secondary study of a trial of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training (BFB) in 60 women (>60 yrs) with UUI, plus 11 age-matched continent controls...
April 19, 2018: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672306/effects-of-bladder-training-and-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-in-female-patients-with-overactive-bladder-syndrome-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#19
Raheela Mohsin Rizvi, Novera Ghayoor Chughtai, Naheed Kapadia
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to see the efficacy of 3 different modes of treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in symptoms reduction and quality of life improvement. METHODS: We conducted a 12-week single-blinded randomized controlled trial of women aged 22-65 years with clinical diagnosis of OAB. Arm A (n = 47) received bladder training, arm B (n = 50) received pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and arm C (n = 50) received PFMT with biofeedback. Bladder diary was used to assess the difference in urinary frequency, urgency, and leak accidents before and after treatment...
2018: Urologia Internationalis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29644384/efficacy-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-in-women-with-overactive-bladder-syndrome-a-systematic-review
#20
REVIEW
Silvia Monteiro, Cassio Riccetto, Angélica Araújo, Laryssa Galo, Nathália Brito, Simone Botelho
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women. METHODS: Searches were performed at MEDLINE, PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Scielo, and Central Cochrane Library PubMed until January 2017. Controlled trials were researched by two independent reviewers. Eligible studies were restricted to random and controlled clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of PFMT in decreasing OAB symptoms...
April 11, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
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