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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29442142/classic-papers-on-pelvic-floor-physiotherapy-the-most-frequently-cited-articles-in-three-decades-1983-2013
#1
REVIEW
Alexandre Fornari, Cristiane Carboni
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Pelvic floor physiotherapy has been utilized extensively over the past decades for the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the most frequently cited articles on pelvic floor physiotherapy published in the last 30 years. METHODS: A PubMed search of all articles published between 1983 and 2013 was performed. Articles with more than 100 citations were identified as "classic," and were further analyzed based on author names, year of publication, journal of publication, subject, study design, country of research, and number of citations...
February 13, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29441244/smartphone-based-reminder-system-to-promote-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-the-management-of-postnatal-urinary-incontinence-historical-control-study-with-propensity-score-matched-analysis
#2
Kaori Kinouchi, Kazutomo Ohashi
Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a smartphone-based reminder system in promoting pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to help postpartum women manage urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: Forty-nine and 212 postpartum women in the intervention and control groups, respectively, received PFMT guidance using a leaflet and verbal instruction as the standard care at an obstetrics clinic in Japan. Women in the intervention group also received PFMT support using the smartphone-based reminder system between January and August 2014...
2018: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29375282/quality-of-life-outcomes-following-surface-electromyography-biofeedback-as-an-adjunct-to-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-urinary-incontinence-a-case-report
#3
Alexandra Hill, Meryl Alappattu
Background: A non-invasive treatment for urinary incontinence (UI) is surface electromyography (sEMG) biofeedback with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A lack of consensus and evidence exists on the Quality of Life (QoL) outcomes following sEMG biofeedback using surface electrodes at the perineum compared to the more invasive intravaginal probe. This case report examines QoL using sEMG biofeedback at the perineum with PFM training for UI. Study Design: Single subject case report...
May 2017: Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29374871/-should-every-woman-after-labor-be-offered-pelvic-floor-physiotherapy
#4
REVIEW
Vered Eisenberg, Rachel Kafri
Pelvic floor damage can occur during pregnancy, during childbirth or post-partum, and may be expressed by symptoms such as urinary incontinence, fecal and gas incontinence, sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and chronic pelvic pain. Some of the symptoms, which manifest later in a woman's life, will go unrecognized in the immediate postpartum period. Most women do not mention their general health, unless specifically asked. Physiotherapists, who are adept with the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and the ability to diagnose unique differences, can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum pelvic floor problems...
January 2018: Harefuah
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29370659/re-influence-of-voluntary-pelvic-floor-muscle-contraction-and-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-on-urethral-closure-pressures-a-systematic-literature-review
#5
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29352460/pelvic-floor-muscle-function-and-quality-of-life-in-post-menopausal-women-with-and-without-pelvic-floor-dysfunction
#6
Isabella Parente Ribeiro Frota, Adriana Bombonato Oliveira Rocha, José Ananias Vasconcelos Neto, Camila Teixeira Moreira Vasconcelos, Thais Fontes De Magalhaes, Sara Arcanjo Lino Karbage, Kathiane Lustosa Augusto, Simony Lira Do Nascimento, Jorge Millem Haddad, Leonardo Robson Pinheiro Sobreira Bezerra
This study aims to compare pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in post-menopause women with and without pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and the relationship between PFM function and quality of life MATERIAL AND METHODS: a case-control study with 216 post-menopause women with (n=126) and without PFD (n=90). PFM function was assessed by digital vaginal palpation using PERFECT scale. Specific quality of life was evaluated by King's Health Questionnaire for women with urinary incontinence and Prolapse Quality-of-Life Questionnaire for women with pelvic organ prolapse...
January 20, 2018: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351646/effect-of-a-postpartum-training-program-on-prevalence-of-diastasis-recti-abdominis-in-postpartum-primiparous-women-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#7
Sandra L Gluppe, Gunvor Hilde, Merete K Tennfjord, Marie E Engh, Kari Bø
Background: Diastasis recti abdominis affects a significant number of women during the prenatal and postnatal period. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of a postpartum training program on prevalence of diastasis recti abdominis. Design: The design was a secondary analysis of an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five primiparous women (mean age 29.8±4.1) were randomized to an exercise or control group...
January 17, 2018: Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29329567/modified-pilates-as-an-adjunct-to-standard-physiotherapy-care-for-urinary-incontinence-a-mixed-methods-pilot-for-a-randomised-controlled-trial
#8
Adi Lausen, Louise Marsland, Samantha Head, Joanna Jackson, Berthold Lausen
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a distressing condition affecting at least 5 million women in England and Wales. Traditionally, physiotherapy for UI comprises pelvic floor muscle training, but although evidence suggests this can be effective it is also recognised that benefits are often compromised by patient motivation and commitment. In addition, there is increasing recognition that physical symptoms alone are poor indicators of the impact of incontinence on individuals' lives...
January 12, 2018: BMC Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29288068/regular-exercisers-have-stronger-pelvic-floor-muscles-than-non-regular-exercisers-at-midpregnancy
#9
Kari Bø, Marie Ellstrøm Engh, Gunvor Hilde
BACKGROUND: Today, all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 min of aerobic activity on most days of the week, in addition to perform strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week, and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. OBJECTIVES: To compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥ 30 minutes ≥ 3 times per week) and non-exercisers at mid-pregnancy...
December 26, 2017: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280115/-pelvic-floor-biofeedback-therapy-in-pelvic-floor-diseases
#10
Shuqing Ding
Pelvic floor biofeedback therapy is safe and effective in chronic constipation, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and pelvic floor pain whereas the heterogeneous indication affects the efficacy evaluation and technical communication. The best indications are as follows: (1) Pelvic floor myogenic dysfunction without severe pelvic organ prolapse and severe neurogenic defect; (2) Patients have good mental cognition and treatment adherence who fulfill the training with the therapist. The training protocol is conducted at hospital or at home, and is as follows: (1) To help patients to target the pelvic floor muscles; (2) To improve the type I( muscle tonic contraction variability; (3) To improve the pelvic floor type I( and type II( muscles activity coordination; (4) To enhance the pelvic floor muscle strength and rectum defecation awareness...
December 25, 2017: Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29273048/propel-implementation-of-an-evidence-based-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-intervention-for-women-with-pelvic-organ-prolapse-a-realist-evaluation-and-outcomes-study-protocol
#11
Margaret Maxwell, Karen Semple, Sarah Wane, Andrew Elders, Edward Duncan, Purva Abhyankar, Joyce Wilkinson, Douglas Tincello, Eileen Calveley, Mary MacFarlane, Doreen McClurg, Karen Guerrero, Helen Mason, Suzanne Hagen
BACKGROUND: Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) is estimated to affect 41%-50% of women aged over 40. Findings from the multi-centre randomised controlled "Pelvic Organ Prolapse PhysiotherapY" (POPPY) trial showed that individualised pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) was effective in reducing symptoms of prolapse, improved quality of life and showed clear potential to be cost-effective. However, provision of PFMT for prolapse continues to vary across the UK, with limited numbers of women's health physiotherapists specialising in its delivery...
December 22, 2017: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29248338/efficacy-of-hypopressive-abdominal-gymnastics-in-rehabilitating-the-pelvic-floor-of-women-a-systematic-review
#12
R Ruiz de Viñaspre Hernández
BACKGROUND: Hypopressive abdominal gymnastics has been proposed as a new paradigm in rehabilitating the pelvic floor. Its claims contraindicate the recommendation for pelvic floor muscle training during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hypopressive abdominal gymnastics is more effective than pelvic floor muscle training or other alternative conservative treatments for rehabilitating the pelvic floor. METHODS: We consulted the databases of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), PubMed, Scopus, Trip Database and Web of Science...
December 13, 2017: Actas Urologicas Españolas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29245113/the-temporal-relationship-between-activity-of-the-pelvic-floor-muscles-and-motion-of-selected-urogenital-landmarks-in-healthy-nulliparous-women
#13
Stéphanie Thibault-Gagnon, Cindy Auchincloss, Ryan Graham, Linda McLean
AIMS: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pelvic floor muscle (PFM) electromyographic (EMG) activation and urogenital landmark motion measured using 2D transperineal ultrasound (US) imaging. METHODS: Eight healthy, nulliparous women performed maximum voluntary PFM contractions while EMG and transperineal US images were acquired simultaneously. Changes in the levator plate length (LPL), bladder neck (BN) position and urethral position were determined by visual inspection...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240620/urinary-incontinence-pelvic-floor-muscle-and-behavioral-training-for-women
#14
Lisa S Pair, William E Somerall
Primary care NPs play a significant role in recognizing and implementing strategies for urinary incontinence (UI) management. The American College of Physicians recommends pelvic floor muscle and behavioral training as initial treatment for UI. This article provides practical tips that can help improve urinary continence.
January 15, 2018: Nurse Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239782/the-morphology-of-foot-soft-tissues-is-associated-with-running-shoe-type-in-healthy-recreational-runners
#15
Xianyi Zhang, Tijs Delabastita, Joselien Lissens, Floor De Beenhouwer, Benedicte Vanwanseele
OBJECTIVES: To determine the differences in the morphology of foot soft tissues between runners using different types of running shoes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Thirty-eight recreational runners were divided into four groups based on running shoe type, namely, neutral shoes, motion control shoes, minimalistic shoes and neutral shoes with custom-made insoles. An arch height index and a relative arch deformation index were calculated for each participant...
November 22, 2017: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29226999/comparison-of-outcomes-between-postpartum-and-non-postpartum-women-with-stress-urinary-incontinence-treated-with-conservative-therapy-a-prospective-cohort-study
#16
Zhi-Jing Sun, Lan Zhu, Mao-Lian Liang, Tao Xu, Jing-He Lang
AIM: This study aimed to compare the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) between postpartum and non-postpartum women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and to detect potential factors that may influence these outcomes. METHODS: A total of 54 and 79 participants were recruited into postpartum (PP group) and non-postpartum (non-PP group) groups, respectively. A physiotherapist treated the participants twice a week for 6-8 weeks. At baseline and 6 and 12 months after treatment, the 1-h pad weight test (PWT), vaginal contraction pressure (VCP), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form (IIQ-7) were assessed by an evaluator or physiotherapist...
December 11, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222718/treatment-of-stress-urinary-incontinence-with-a-mobile-app-factors-associated-with-success
#17
Emma Nyström, Ina Asklund, Malin Sjöström, Hans Stenlund, Eva Samuelsson
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Stress urinary incontinence is common among women. First-line treatment includes pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and lifestyle advice, which can be provided via a mobile app. The efficacy of app-based treatment has been demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In this study, we aimed to analyze factors associated with successful treatment. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from the RCT. At baseline and 3-month follow-up, participants (n = 61) answered questions about symptoms, quality of life, background, and PFMT...
December 8, 2017: International Urogynecology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29202394/common-errors-made-in-attempt-to-contract-the-pelvic-floor-muscles-in-women-early-after-delivery-a-prospective-observational-study
#18
Hedwig Neels, Stefan De Wachter, Jean-Jacques Wyndaele, Tinne Van Aggelpoel, Alexandra Vermandel
OBJECTIVES: The ability to perform a correct pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) is necessary to start pelvic floor muscle training after delivery. COMMOV are "c"ontractions of "o"ther "m"uscles (m. rectus abdominus, the gluteal muscles, and the adductors), and other "mov"ements (pelvic tilt, breath holding, and straining) performed in addition to or instead of the PFMC. COMMOV are probably the most common errors in attempt to contract the pelvic floor muscles during the first days after delivery...
January 2018: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145873/group-physiotherapy-compared-to-individual-physiotherapy-to-treat-urinary-incontinence-in-aging-women-study-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#19
Chantale Dumoulin, Mélanie Morin, Marie-Hélène Mayrand, Michel Tousignant, Michal Abrahamowicz
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI), one of the most prevalent health concerns confronting women aged over 60 years, affects up to 55% of older community-dwelling women-20-25% with severe symptoms. Clinical practice guidelines recommend individualized pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) as a first-line treatment for stress or mixed UI in women, although lack of human and financial resources limits delivery of this first-line treatment. Preliminary data suggest that group-based treatments may provide the answer...
November 16, 2017: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144956/re-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-secondary-prevention-of-pelvic-organ-prolapse-prevprol-a-multicentre-randomised-controlled-trial
#20
Alan J Wein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Journal of Urology
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