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Hemifacial spasm

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29749909/letter-to-the-editor-delayed-facial-palsy-after-microvascular-decompression-for-hemifacial-spasm
#1
Jian Cheng, Heng Zhang, Ding Lei
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 11, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705021/endoscope-assisted-decompression-of-facial-nerve-for-treatment-of-hemifacial-spasm
#2
J Magnan
Microvascular decompression has become the sole method for a curative treatment of primary hemifacial spasm. Finding the responsible conflicting artery is not always easy as its location can be deeply situated within the cerebellopontine/medullary fissure at the facial root exit zone. Sole or additional offending vessel(s) may be at the meatus of the internal auditory canal (5% of the cases). Identifying the compressive vessel(s) and performing decompression is in most cases possible without cerebellar retraction by classical microsurgical techniques...
April 25, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705020/imaging-of-hemifacial-spasm
#3
M Hermier
Almost all primary hemifacial spasms are associated with one or more neurovascular conflicts, most often at the root exit zone in the immediate vicinity of the brainstem. Imaging has first to exclude a secondary hemifacial spasm and secondly to search for and characterize the responsible neurovascular conflict(s). Magnetic resonance imaging should include high-resolution anatomical hyper T2-weighted sequences and magnetic resonance angiography by using 1.5 or even better 3 Tesla magnets. The most frequent vascular compressions are from the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery, the posterior-inferior cerebellar artery and the vertebrobasilar artery; venous conflicts are very rare...
April 25, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691117/an-improved-methodology-for-intraoperative-monitoring-of-the-lateral-spreading-response-during-surgery-for-hemifacial-spasm
#4
EDITORIAL
Vedran Deletis, Sedat Ulkatan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 16, 2018: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680283/the-conflicting-vessels-in-hemifacial-spasm-literature-review-and-anatomical-surgical-implications
#5
P Mercier, M Sindou
The conflicting vessels in hemifacial spasm: literature review and anatomical-surgical implications. Since several decades, it has been established that so-called primary hemifacial spasm is linked to neuro-vascular conflicts in the facial nerve, especially its root exit zone (REZ). Based on our review of the detailed publications of literature (2489 patients), together with our own series (340 patients), the responsible vessels found at surgery were: the posterior inferior cerebellar artery in 47.2%, the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in 45...
April 18, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680282/hemifacial-spasm-associated-with-other-cranial-nerve-syndromes-literature-review
#6
M Sindou, P Mercier
Hyperactive dysfunction may affect all cranial nerves in the posterior fossa. According to literature review and personal experience, hemifacial spasm was found to be associated not only with the most frequent cranial nerve syndromes, namely: trigeminal neuralgia, vago-glossopharyngeal neuralgia or VIIIth nerve disturbances manifested by vertigo, tinnitus, hearing decrease, but also with rarer syndromes like geniculate neuralgia, masticatory spasm etc. Also, a number of publications have pointed out the relatively high incidence of the coexistence of hemifacial spasm and systemic blood hypertension; both can be cured by vascular decompression of the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla and IX-Xth route entry zone (REZ) together with the facial REZ...
April 18, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673579/new-insights-into-the-pathophysiology-of-primary-hemifacial-spasm
#7
J-P Lefaucheur
Primary hemifacial spasm (pHFS) is due to a benign compression of the facial motor nerve by an offending vessel, leading to increased nerve excitability. Facial nerve hyperexcitability presents two different aspects. First, there is a spontaneous and ectopic generation of action potentials on the incriminated nerve and then this ectopic impulse can propagate and spread "laterally" from one facial nerve branch to another. This results in spontaneous and synkinetic spasms affecting one hemiface. Although the increase in excitability certainly concerns the nucleus of the facial motor nerve in the brainstem, it seems unlikely that the primary origin of this hyperexcitability and the associated phenomenon of lateral spreading strictly originate at the nuclear level...
April 16, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673578/diagnosis-of-primary-hemifacial-spasm
#8
J-P Lefaucheur, N Ben Daamer, S Sangla, C Le Guerinel
The diagnosis of primary hemifacial spasm (pHFS), due to a benign compression of the facial motor nerve by a vessel, within or close to its root exit zone, is often made with delay. Misdiagnosis includes psychogenic spasm, tics, facial myokymia or blepharospasm, but in fact post-facial palsy synkinesis (post-paralytic HFS) is the closest clinical condition, because it is limited to the territory of the facial nerve of a single hemiface. The differential diagnosis between these two entities, whose pathophysiological mechanisms are very different, can be made by electroneuromyographic (ENMG) examination...
April 16, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625882/a-new-method-for-monitoring-abnormal-muscle-response-in-hemifacial-spasm-a-prospective-study
#9
Seunghoon Lee, Sang-Ku Park, Jeong-A Lee, Byung-Euk Joo, Doo-Sik Kong, Dae-Won Seo, Kwan Park
OBJECTIVE: To examine a new abnormal muscle response (AMR) monitoring method during microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm. METHODS: 486 patients with hemifacial spasm were monitored for an AMR during MVD with a new method involving preoperative mapping and intraoperative centrifugal stimulation of the facial nerve. For the last 62 patients, we performed the AMR monitoring using both, the new and conventional methods simultaneously. RESULTS: Preoperative facial nerve mapping showed that the maximal AMR was detected most frequently (66...
March 27, 2018: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29617905/microvascular-decompression-of-facial-nerve-and-pexy-of-the-left-vertebral-artery-for-left-hemifacial-spasm-3-dimensional-operative-video
#10
Chun-Yu Cheng, Rakshith Shetty, Vicente Martinez, Laligam N Sekhar
A 73-yr-old man presented with intractable left hemifacial spasm of 4 yr duration. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed significant compression of left facial nerve by the left vertebral artery (VA) and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA).The patient underwent a left retrosigmoid craniotomy and a microvascular decompression of the cranial nerve (CN) VII. Intraoperatively, we found that the distal AICA had a protracted subarcuate extradural course.1 This was relieved by intra/extradural dissection...
March 29, 2018: Operative Neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29610004/-bell-s-palsy
#11
S Prud'hon, N Kubis
Idiopathic peripheral facial palsy, also named Bell's palsy, is the most common cause of peripheral facial palsy in adults. Although it is considered as a benign condition, its social and psychological impact can be dramatic, especially in the case of incomplete recovery. The main pathophysiological hypothesis is the reactivation of HSV 1 virus in the geniculate ganglia, leading to nerve edema and its compression through the petrosal bone. Patients experience an acute (less than 24 hours) motor deficit involving ipsilateral muscles of the upper and lower face and reaching its peak within the first three days...
March 30, 2018: La Revue de Médecine Interne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554395/an-atypical-presentation-of-hemifacial-spasm-secondary-to-neurovascular-compression
#12
Enrique Palacios, Radia Ksayer, Jeremy Nguyen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29545951/effect-of-hemifacial-spasm-on-intraocular-pressure-measurement
#13
Erdogan Cicik, Rengin Yildirim, Ceyhun Arici, Funda Dikkaya, Osman Sevki Arslan
Purpose: To evaluate the effect of hemifacial spasm (HFS) on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement. Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with HFS and 25 age- and gender-matched randomly selected eyes of healthy volunteers underwent corneal pachymetry and IOP measurements using Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) and noncontact tonometer (NCT). IOP measurements were performed before (during HFS) and 2 weeks after Botox injections in HFS patients and in healthy volunteers without Botox injections...
2018: Journal of Ophthalmology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29492656/upfront-gamma-knife-surgery-for-facial-nerve-schwannomas-retrospective-case-series-analysis-and-systematic-review
#14
Jean-Nicolas Comps, Constantin Tuleasca, Beatrice Goncalves-Matoso, Luis Schiappacasse, Maud Marguet, Marc Levivier
INTRODUCTION: Facial nerve schwannomas are rare tumors and account for less than 2% of intracranial neurinomas, despite being the most common tumors of the facial nerve. The optimal management is currently under debate and includes observation, microsurgical resection, radiosurgery (RS), and fractionated radiotherapy. Radiosurgery might be a valuable alternative, as a minimally invasive technique, in symptomatic patients and/or presenting tumor growth. METHODS: We review our series of four consecutive cases, treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) between July 2010 and July 2017 in Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland...
May 2018: Acta Neurochirurgica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29478149/botulinum-toxin-treatment-of-movement-disorders
#15
REVIEW
Yasaman Safarpour, Bahman Jabbari
Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are now among the most widely used therapeutic agents in clinical medicine with indications applied to the fields of movement disorders, pain disorders, and autonomic dysfunction. In this literature review, the efficacy and utility of BoNTs in the field of movement disorders are assessed using the criteria of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. The literature supports a level A efficacy (established) for BoNT therapy in cervical dystonia and a level B efficacy (probably effective) for blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, laryngeal dystonia (spasmodic dysphonia), task-specific dystonias, essential tremor, and Parkinson rest tremor...
February 24, 2018: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29454467/microvascular-decompression-for-hemifacial-spasm-outcome-on-spasm-and-complications-a-review
#16
M Sindou, P Mercier
Over the last decades microvascular decompression (MVD) has been established as the curative treatment of the primary Hemifacial Spasm (HFS), proven to be linked in almost all cases to a neurovascular compression of the facial nerve. Because the disease is not life-threatening and MVD not totally innocuous, efficacy and safety have to be weighted before decision taken of indicating surgery. The authors have been charged by the French Speaking Society of Neurosurgery to conduct a detailed evaluation of the probability of relief of the spasm that MVD is able to obtain, together with its potential complications...
February 15, 2018: Neuro-Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29425330/trigeminal-nerve-compression-without-trigeminal-neuralgia-intraoperative-vs-imaging-evidence
#17
Ronak H Jani, Marion A Hughes, Michael S Gold, Barton F Branstetter, Zachary E Ligus, Raymond F Sekula
BACKGROUND: While high-resolution imaging is increasingly used in guiding decisions about surgical interventions for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, direct assessment of the extent of vascular contact of the trigeminal nerve is still considered the gold standard for the determination of whether nerve decompression is warranted. OBJECTIVE: To compare intraoperative and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the prevalence and severity of vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients without classical trigeminal neuralgia...
February 6, 2018: Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351689/microvascular-decompression-for-patients-with-hemifacial-spasm-associated-with-common-trunk-anomaly-of-the-cerebellar-arteries-case-study-and-review-of-literature
#18
Ehab El Refaee, Christian Rosenstengel, Joerg Baldauf, Dirk T Pillich, Marc Matthes, Henry W S Schroeder
BACKGROUND: Few previous studies have described the origin of both anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries from one vessel as a common trunk anomaly. No previous studies have clearly described the aforementioned anomaly depending on intraoperative endoscopic visualization. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of a common trunk anomaly with hemifacial spasm, which makes microvascular decompression more challenging. METHODS: All patients with common trunk anomaly associated with hemifacial spasm who received surgical treatment between 2006 and 2015 in our institution were identified in our prospectively collected database...
February 1, 2018: Operative Neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29344780/intraoperative-monitoring-of-z-l-response-zlr-and-abnormal-muscle-response-amr-during-microvascular-decompression-for-hemifacial-spasm-interpreting-the-role-of-zlr
#19
Byung-Chul Son, Hak-Cheol Ko, Jin-Gyu Choi
BACKGROUND: Z-L response (ZLR) has been suggested to a new electromyographic (EMG) potential recorded from the facial muscle of patient with hemifacial spasm (HFS) during microvascular decompression (MVD). Although ZLR has been suggested to be useful, experience of ZLR monitoring is limited and its significance during MVD is still unclear. METHODS: To investigate the significance of ZLR, both ZLR and abnormal muscle response (AMR) were simultaneously recorded before and after decompression of root exit zone (REZ) in 20 consecutive patients with HFS...
January 17, 2018: Acta Neurochirurgica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342440/the-critical-warning-sign-of-real-time-brainstem-auditory-evoked-potentials-during-microvascular-decompression-for-hemifacial-spasm
#20
Sang-Ku Park, Byung-Euk Joo, Seunghoon Lee, Jeong-A Lee, Jeong-Ho Hwang, Doo-Sik Kong, Dae-Won Seo, Kwan Park, Hoon-Taek Lee
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to define the critical warning sign of real-time brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) for predicting hearing loss (HL) after microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS). METHODS: Nine hundred and thirty-two patients with HFS who underwent MVD with intraoperative monitoring (IOM) of BAEP were analyzed. We used a 43.9 Hz/s stimulation rate and 400 averaging trials to obtain BAEP. To evaluate HL, pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination scoring were performed before and one week after surgery...
January 4, 2018: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
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