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Hemifacial spasm

Ge Jia, Li Zhang, Hongxiang Ren, Jun Xu, Xiaoli Xu, Yanbing Yu
BACKGROUND: Abnormal muscle response (AMR) has been considered as a predictor of the prognosis after microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, its predictive value has not always been satisfactory. The objective of this work was to confirm an optimal range of stimulus intensities to elicit AMR in surgery. METHODS: Seventy-two consecutive patients with primary HFS treated by MVD were retrospectively included in this study. A wide range of stimulus intensities from 1 to 100 mA was applied in AMR monitoring...
October 25, 2016: Acta Neurochirurgica
C V M Verhagen, J Meulstee, H D Boogaarts, W I M Verhagen
BACKGROUND: About 5-15% of people in the Western world will suffer from an extended period of tinnitus during their lifetime. This is often a non-treatable, disabling disorder. Tinnitus can be classified as pulsatile or non-pulsatile. Pulsatile tinnitus can be caused by a treatable neurovascular compression. CASE DESCRIPTION: Here we describe two patients, a 68-year old woman and 40-year old man suffering from pulsatile tinnitus and hemifacial spams due to neurovascular compression of the facial and acoustic nerve in the anterior cranial fossa...
2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Ozan Erol, Erdinç Aydın
BACKGROUND: Hemifacial spasm is a sudden, involuntary and synchronous spasm of the facial muscles. The most frequent cause of this condition is compression of the facial nerves due to vascular pathologies. The most commonly used method of treatment is Botulinum toxin injection. However, the gold standard treatment is surgical treatment. CASE REPORT: A 64-year-old male patient with hemifacial spasms, which had occurred due to a rare parotid mass that had been surgically treated, is presented in this case...
September 2016: Balkan Medical Journal
Paola Perozzo, Adriana Salatino, Paolo Cerrato, Raffaella Ricci
Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Eliot J Martin, Matthew L Carlson, Eric J Moore, Ryan S Jackson
OBJECTIVE: To report hemifacial spasm (HFS) as a rare presenting symptom of a benign parotid neoplasm involving the stylomastoid foramen. METHODS: Case report with literature review. RESULTS: An 18-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of a progressively enlarging right infra-auricular mass with new onset ipsilateral severe HFS. Clinical vetting unveiled a palpable 2 cm, firm, minimally mobile mass medial to the angle of the mandible...
October 12, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
Tessa M LeWitt
A wide range of etiologies can cause hemifacial spasm (HFS), including infection. In this case report, a 44-year-old woman developed HFS and was explored surgically 7 years later. No abnormalities were found. Afterward, treatment of a surgical wound infection with an oral cephalosporin resulted in a temporary HFS remission that had never occurred previously. This antibiotic experience prompted further workup for an underlying infection, which ultimately led to diagnosis of Lyme disease. Presentation of HFS due to Lyme disease has not been reported...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Neuropharmacology
Lei Xia, Ming-Xing Liu, Jun Zhong, Ning-Ning Dou, Bin Li, Hui Sun, Shi-Ting Li
Although the microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery has become an effective remedy for cranial nerve rhizopathies, it is still challengeable and may result in a fatal sequel sometimes. Therefore, the operative skill needs to be further highlighted with emphasis on the safety and a preplan for management of postoperative fatal complications should be established. We retrospectively analyzed 6974 cases of MVD. Postoperatively, 46 patients (0.66 %) presented decline in consciousness with a positive finger-nose test (or failure to be tested) after wake up from the anesthesia, whom were focused on in this study...
October 12, 2016: Neurosurgical Review
A Fasano, M Tinazzi
Functional movement disorders (FMDs) affecting the eyelids, tongue, and other facial muscles are often underrecognized because their phenomenology has not been fully characterized. Nevertheless, these disorders are more common than previously thought. In this chapter we will discuss the phenomenology as well as the clinical and instrumental diagnosis of facial FMDs. Facial FMDs should be considered when a patient exhibits any combination of the following features: (1) fixed unilateral facial contractions, especially with lower lip, with or without ipsilateral jaw involvement, of maximal severity at onset; (2) inconsistent features such as changes in side and pattern during or between examination; (3) associated somatoform or nonphysiologic sensory or motor findings; (4) reduction or abolition of facial spasm with distraction; (5) response to suggestion or psychotherapy; (6) rapid onset and/or spontaneous remissions; and (7) normal neurologic examination...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Seong Ho Lee, Jae Sung Park, Young Hwan Ahn
OBJECTIVE: Microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) involving the vertebral artery (VA) can be technically challenging. We investigated the therapeutic effects of a bioglue-coated Teflon sling technique on the VA during MVD in 42 cases. METHODS: A bioglue-coated Teflon sling was crafted by the surgeon and applied to patients in whom neurovascular compression was caused by the VA. The radiologic data, intra-operative findings with detailed introduction of the procedure, and the clinical outcomes of each patient were reviewed and analyzed...
September 2016: Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
Nan-Xiang Xiong, Daisong Albert Tan, Peng Fu, Yi-Zhi Huang, Song Tong, Hua Yu
We report on a female patient who received microvascular decompression due to hemifacial spasm. Neuro-Patch® was used during the operation to repair and replace damaged dura mater. Six days after the operation, the incision wound was found to be infected. Abscesses were present deep in the incision. However, because the artificial dura mater was attached so tightly to the original dura mater, the infection was not able to spread inside the skull. After 3 months of meticulous wound cleaning and drug treatment to promote the growth of granulation tissue, we were able to gradually achieve healing of the infection without having to remove the non-absorbable artificial dura mater...
2016: Journal of Long-term Effects of Medical Implants
Andrew G Lee, Neil R Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 8, 2016: JAMA Ophthalmology
Caroline L S Kilduff, Edward J Casswell, Tahrina Salam, Dov Hersh, Santiago Ortiz-Perez, Daniel Ezra
Importance: Patients with benign essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm are known to use botulinum toxin injections and alleviating maneuvers to help control their symptoms. The clinical correlates between the use of botulinum toxin injections and the use of alleviating maneuvers are not well established. Objective: To determine whether the use of alleviating maneuvers for benign essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm correlates with disease severity or botulinum toxin treatment...
September 8, 2016: JAMA Ophthalmology
Fuminari Komatsu, Masaaki Imai, Akihiro Hirayama, Kazuko Hotta, Naokazu Hayashi, Shinri Oda, Masami Shimoda, Mitsunori Matsumae
Background Endoscopic microvascular decompression (MVD) offers reliable identification of neurovascular conflicts under superb illumination, and it provides minimally invasive surgery for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. Transposition techniques have been reported as a decompression method to prevent adhesion and granuloma formation around decompression sites, providing better surgical outcomes. The feasibility and effects of transposition under endoscopic MVD were evaluated. Material and Methods Fully endoscopic MVD was performed using 4-mm 0- and 30-degree endoscopes...
September 5, 2016: Journal of Neurological Surgery. Part A, Central European Neurosurgery
Levent Tanrikulu, Michael Buchfelder, Ramin Naraghi
AIM: There is a feared complication for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after microvascular decompression (MVD). In this study we present our experience of fleece-bound tissue sealing in MVD with our aim to minimize the rate of postoperative CSF leakage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We treated 50 patients (female/male: 26/24) with neurovascular compression (NVC) syndromes (trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and glossopharyngeal neuralgia) by MVD from the year 2003 to 2006...
April 20, 2016: Turkish Neurosurgery
Kyeong Joon Kim, Jong-Min Kim, Yun Jung Bae, Hee Joon Bae, Beomseok Jeon, Jae Hyung Kim, Jeong Ho Han, Chang Wan Oh
BACKGROUND: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is frequently caused by vascular compression of the facial nerve. Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBDE) may cause vascular crowding in the limited space of the posterior fossa, increasing the chance of vascular compression of the facial nerve. We investigated the prevalence of VBDE in HFS. METHODS: We analyzed the presence of VBDE on 3.0 T magnetic resonance images in patients with HFS and control subjects; age, sex and hypertension were matched...
August 20, 2016: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Jesse D Lawrence, Chad Tuchek, Aaron A Cohen-Gadol, Raymond F Sekula
OBJECTIVE Use of the ICU during admission to a hospital is associated with a significant portion of the total health care costs for that stay. Patients undergoing microvascular decompression (MVD) for cranial neuralgias are routinely admitted postoperatively to the ICU for monitoring. The primary purpose of this study was to compare complication rates of patients with and without a postoperative ICU stay following MVD. The secondary intents were to identify predictors of complications, to analyze variables of health care resource utilization, and to estimate the cost of postoperative management...
August 12, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery
Evan Cyril Edmond, Samantha Xue-Li Sim, Hui-Hua Li, Eng-King Tan, Ling-Ling Chan
BACKGROUND: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a disabling neurological condition. Vascular tortuosity in HFS patients has not been quantified objectively and its relationship with hypertension and posterior fossa volume (PF) is unknown. In a case control magnetic resonance imaging and angiographic (MRI/A) study, we quantified and compared the vascular tortuosity in HFS and controls, and evaluated its relationship with hypertension and PF. METHODS: Using a commercially available vessel probe tool, an index of tortuosity based on vessel over chord length was employed to quantify vascular tortuosity of the vertebral (VA) and basilar arteries (BA) in 79 subjects (40 HFS, 39 controls)...
2016: BMC Neurology
Takeshi Kuroda, Yu Saito, Kazuhisa Fujita, Satoshi Yano, Seiichiro Ishigaki, Hirotaka Kato, Hidetomo Murakami, Kenjiro Ono
Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a peripherally-induced movement disorder characterized by the involuntary, unilateral, intermittent, irregular, tonic or clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Kindling-like hyperactivity of the facial nucleus induced by constant stimulation of compressing artery is considered as the predominant mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of HFS. As a treatment for HFS, microsurgical decompression and botulinum toxin injection have been shown to be highly successful...
July 22, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Peeraphong Thiarawat, Apirath Wangtheraprasert, Jiraporn Jitprapaikulsan
Vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia (VGPN) is a very rare condition. VGPN with convulsive like attack is even rarer All of the cases had their head turned to the opposite side of facial pain. Hemifacial spasm occurring concurrently with VGPN has never been reported. Herein, we present the first case of VGPN that had ipsilateral hemifacial spasm and versive seizure-like movement to the same side of facial pain. We reported a 71-year-old man presenting with multiple episodes of intermittent sharp shooting pain arising on the right middle neck, followed by hemifacial spasm on right face...
January 2016: Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand, Chotmaihet Thangphaet
Sadie Wickwar, Hayley McBain, Stanton P Newman, Shashivadan P Hirani, Catherine Hurt, Nicola Dunlop, Chris Flood, Daniel G Ezra
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Trials
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