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Emotional stress

Thanos Karatzias, Mark Shevlin, Claire Fyvie, Philip Hyland, Erifili Efthymiadou, Danielle Wilson, Neil Roberts, Jonathan I Bisson, Chris R Brewin, Marylene Cloitre
Among the conditions following exposure to traumatic life events proposed by ICD-11 are Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD). The primary aim of this study was to provide an assessment of the reliability and validity of a newly developed self-report measure of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD: the ICD-11 Trauma Questionnaire (ICD-TQ). Participants in this study were a sample of individuals who were referred for psychological therapy to a National Health Service (NHS) trauma centre in Scotland (N=193)...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Anxiety Disorders
Daniel Schwarzkopf, Hendrik Rüddel, Daniel O Thomas-Rüddel, Jörg Felfe, Bernhard Poidinger, Claudia T Matthäus-Krämer, Christiane S Hartog, Frank Bloos
OBJECTIVES: Perceiving nonbeneficial treatment is stressful for ICU staff and may be associated with burnout. We aimed to investigate predictors and consequences of perceived nonbeneficial treatment and to compare nurses and junior and senior physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, multicenter paper-pencil survey on personal and work-related characteristics, perceived nonbeneficial treatment, burnout, and intention to leave the job. SETTING: Convenience sample of 23 German ICUs...
October 21, 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Christina Alliger-Horn, Peter Lutz Zimmermann, Mervyn Schmucker
BACKGROUND: The consideration of specific trauma-associated emotions poses a challenge for the differential treatment planning in trauma therapy. Soldiers experiencing deployment-related posttraumatic stress disorder often struggle with emotions of guilt and shame as a central component of their PTSD. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which soldiers' PTSD symptoms and their trauma-related guilt and shame may be affected as a function of their ability to develop compassionate imagery between their CURRENT SELF (today) and their TRAUMATIZED SELF (back then)...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Clinical Medicine
Rahul A Bharadwaj, Andrew E Jaffe, Qiang Chen, Amy Deep-Soboslay, Aaron L Goldman, Michelle I Mighdoll, John A Cotoia, Anna C Brandtjen, JooHeon Shin, Thomas M Hyde, Venkata S Mattay, Daniel R Weinberger, Joel E Kleinman
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) follows exposure to a traumatic event in susceptible individuals. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic sequence variants that are associated with the risk of developing PTSD. To follow up on identifying the molecular mechanisms of these risk variants, we performed genotype to RNA sequencing-derived quantitative expression (whole gene, exon, and exon junction levels) analysis in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of normal postmortem human brains...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Maureen Ritchey, Andrew M McCullough, Charan Ranganath, Andrew P Yonelinas
Acute stress has been shown to modulate memory for recently learned information, an effect attributed to the influence of stress hormones on medial temporal lobe (MTL) consolidation processes. However, little is known about which memories will be affected when stress follows encoding. One possibility is that stress interacts with encoding processes to selectively protect memories that had elicited responses in the hippocampus and amygdala, two MTL structures important for memory formation. There is limited evidence for interactions between encoding processes and consolidation effects in humans, but recent studies of consolidation in rodents have emphasized the importance of encoding "tags" for determining the impact of consolidation manipulations on memory...
October 24, 2016: Hippocampus
Elma I Lorenzo-Blanco, Alan Meca, Jennifer B Unger, Andrea Romero, José Szapocznik, Brandy Piña-Watson, Miguel Ángel Cano, Byron L Zamboanga, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Sabrina E Des Rosiers, Daniel W Soto, Juan A Villamar, Karina M Lizzi, Monica Pattarroyo, Seth J Schwartz
U.S. Latino parents can face cultural stressors in the form of acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, and a negative context of reception. It stands to reason that these cultural stressors may negatively impact Latino youth's emotional well-being and health risk behaviors by increasing parents' depressive symptoms and compromising the overall functioning of the family. To test this possibility, we analyzed data from a six-wave longitudinal study with 302 recently immigrated (<5 years in the United States) Latino parents (74% mothers, Mage  = 41...
October 23, 2016: Family Process
Sherie Ma, Craig M Smith, Anna Blasiak, Andrew L Gundlach
Relaxin-3 is a member of a superfamily of structurally-related peptides that includes relaxin and insulin-like peptide hormones. Soon after the discovery of the relaxin-3 gene, relaxin-3 was identified as an abundant neuropeptide in brain with a distinctive topographical distribution within a small number of GABA neuron populations that is well conserved across species. Relaxin-3 is thought to exert its biological actions through a single class-A GPCR - relaxin-family peptide receptor 3 (RXFP3). Class-A comprises GPCRs for relaxin-3 and insulin-like peptide-5 and other peptides such as orexin and the monoamine transmitters...
October 23, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Monique L Smith, Caroline M Hostetler, Mary M Heinricher, Andrey E Ryabinin
A complex relationship exists between the psychosocial environment and the perception and experience of pain, and the mechanisms of the social communication of pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study examined the social communication of pain and demonstrates that "bystander" mice housed and tested in the same room as mice subjected to inflammatory pain or withdrawal from morphine or alcohol develop corresponding hyperalgesia. Olfactory cues mediate the transfer of hyperalgesia to the bystander mice, which can be measured using mechanical, thermal, and chemical tests...
October 2016: Science Advances
Stefanie Mache, Lisa Baresi, Monika Bernburg, Karin Vitzthum, David Groneberg
BACKGROUND: Dealing with work-related stress is highly prevalent for employees in Gynecology Medicine. Junior physicians, in particular, have to face high working demands and challenges while starting their medical career after graduation. Job resources (i.e., social support) and personal resources (coping skills) might reduce job strain. The evidence for supportive and effective mental health interventions for clinicians is limited. Offering psychosocial skill training for entrants in Gynecology Medicine is expected to be highly beneficial...
October 22, 2016: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Jiangjun Hui, Gaifeng Feng, Caifeng Zheng, Hui Jin, Ning Jia
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder that gradually destroys memory and cognitive abilities in the elderly, makes a huge emotional and economic burden on the patients and their families. The presence of senile plaques and the loss of cholinergic neurons in the brain are two neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Maternal separation (MS) is an animal paradigm designed to make early life stress. Studies on wild type rodents showed that MS could induce AD-like cognitive deficit and pathological changes...
October 19, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Jean-Christophe Chauvet-Gelinier, Bernard Bonin
Cardiovascular events and emotional disorders share a common epidemiology, thus suggesting fundamental pathways linking these different diseases. Growing evidence in the literature highlights the influence of psychological determinants in somatic diseases. A patient's socio-economic aspects, personality traits, health behavior and even biological pathways may contribute to the course of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac events often occur suddenly and the episode can be traumatic for people not prepared for such an event...
October 19, 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Camilla T Damsgaard, Lotte Lauritzen, Hanne Hauger, Stine Vuholm, Marie N Teisen, Christian Ritz, Max Hansen, Janni Niclasen, Christian Mølgaard
BACKGROUND: Most children in Western populations do not meet recommendations for fish consumption. Oily fish is an important source of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), which reduce blood pressure and plasma triacylglycerol in adults and may affect cognitive development and behavior. However, to our knowledge, the potential effects of oily fish on cardiometabolic health, cognitive function, and behavior in children have not been investigated. The aim of the FiSK Junior study is to investigate the effects of oily fish consumption on cardiovascular risk markers, cognitive function, and behavior in healthy children...
October 21, 2016: Trials
Vicky Lehmann, Mariët Hagedoorn, Cynthia A Gerhardt, Madelaine C Keim, Lory Guthrie, Robbert Sanderman, Marrit A Tuinman
PURPOSE: Childhood cancer is stressful for the entire family. Preoccupation and anxiety surrounding the child's illness may result in parents of children with cancer being overprotective or less emotionally responsive toward their children. Such parenting in response to a negative life event like childhood cancer may cause survivors to be more insecurely attached than healthy peers, which could have downstream effects on survivors' romantic relationships later in life. Therefore, we examined survivors' perspectives on parent behaviors, adult attachment, and marital status among adult survivors of childhood cancer relative to controls...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
Stefanie C Vuotto, Kevin R Krull, Chenghong Li, Kevin C Oeffinger, Daniel M Green, Sunita K Patel, Deokumar Srivastava, Marilyn Stovall, Kirsten K Ness, Gregory T Armstrong, Leslie L Robison, Tara M Brinkman
BACKGROUND: The current study was performed to examine associations between childhood cancer therapies, chronic health conditions, and symptoms of emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer. METHODS: Participants included 5021 adult survivors of childhood cancer (mean age, 32.0 years [standard deviation, 7.6 years] with a time since diagnosis of 23.2 years [standard deviation, 4.5 years]) who completed measures assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress...
October 20, 2016: Cancer
Isabell B Purdy, Mary Alice Melwak, Joan R Smith, Carole Kenner, Rebecca Chuffo-Siewert, Donna J Ryan, Sue Hall
BACKGROUND: The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a stressful environment for infants, their families, and the healthcare team. There is an immediate need for neonatal nurses to embrace and translate the new National Perinatal Association recommendations for psychosocial support of NICU parents into clinical practice to demonstrate best practices for infants, their families, and the whole team. PURPOSE: To summarize the current evidence-based practice recommendations and to provide suggestions for team members to develop strategies to adopt and implement them through quality improvement (QI) projects...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Lin Huang, Lluis Capdevila
OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the efficacy of aromatherapy in improving work performance and reducing workplace stress. SUBJECTS: The initial sample comprised 42 administrative university workers (Mage = 42.21 years, standard deviation = 7.12; 10 male). INTERVENTION: All sessions were performed in a university computer classroom. The participants were randomly assigned into an aromatherapy group (AG) and a control group (CG), and they were invited to participate in a specific session only once...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Noortje H Rijken, Remko Soer, Ewold de Maar, Hilco Prins, Wouter B Teeuw, Jan Peuscher, Frits G J Oosterveld
The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, recovery and sleep quality in elite athletes. A prospective pilot study was performed with two distinct cohorts. Soccer players were provided with four sessions of mental coaching combined with daily HRV biofeedback (Group A); track and field athletes were provided with four sessions of mental coaching in combination with daily neurofeedback (Group B)...
October 19, 2016: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
M Pilar Berrios, Natalio Extremera, M Pilar Nieto-Flores
In this study, we examined the relations between dimensions of Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI) and classic constructs, such as social support, on depression, stress, and subjective well-being indicators (life satisfaction and happiness). The study also sought to determine whether PEI dimensions accounted for a significant portion of the variance beyond that of classic constructs in the study of depression, stress, and well-being outcomes in a sample of 442 unemployed subjects. Results indicated that social support and all PEI dimensions are found to be significant and negatively related to depression and stress, and these variables were also found to be significant and positively associated with life satisfaction and happiness...
2016: PeerJ
Jie Wu, Wei-Guang Ding, Minoru Horie
Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) is a subtype of a congenital cardiac syndrome caused by mutation in the KCNQ1 gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the slow component of delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKs) channel. Arrhythmias in LQT1 are characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, as well as the occurrence of life-threatening cardiac events, frequently triggered by adrenergic stimuli (e.g., physical or emotional stress). During the past two decades, much advancement has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis underlying LQT1...
October 2016: Journal of Arrhythmia
Peter A Bos
Variation in the quality of parental care has a tremendous impact on a child's social-emotional development. Research investigating the predictors of this variability in human caregiving behavior has mostly focused on learning mechanisms. Evidence is currently accumulating for the complementary underlying role of steroid hormones and neuropeptides. An overview is provided of the hormones and neuropeptides relevant for human caregiving behavior. Then the developmental factors are described that stimulate variability in sensitivity to these hormones and neuropeptides, which may result in variability in the behavioral repertoire of caregiving...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
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