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David C Houghton, Colleen S McFarland, Martin E Franklin, Michael P Twohig, Scott N Compton, Angela M Neal-Barnett, Stephen M Saunders, Douglas W Woods
OBJECTIVE: Trichotillomania (TTM) is associated with significant embarrassment and is viewed negatively by others. A potentially important outcome variable that is often overlooked in treatment for TTM is appearance and social perception. METHOD: The present study tested whether participants in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of psychotherapy for TTM are viewed more positively by others. All participants in the trial were photographed at baseline and posttreatment...
2016: Psychiatry
Ivar Snorrason, Michael R Walther, T David Elkin, Douglas W Woods
Although cognitive behavioral treatments (CBTs) have been recommended as first-line interventions for trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder [HPD]), research on CBT for young children with HPD is limited. We illustrate the use of family-based CBT for HPD in an 8-year-old boy. The client had a 5-year history of chronic HPD and several large bald spots on the crown of his head. Treatment primarily comprised habit reversal training (HRT) and function-based interventions. The child showed significant improvement in HPD severity and impairment after 8 weekly sessions, although complete abstinence was not achieved...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Hidayatullah Hamidi, Marzia Muhammadi, Bismillah Saberi, Mohammad Arif Sarwari
INTRODUCTION: Trichobezoar is a rare clinical entity in which a ball of hair amasses within the alimentary tract. It can either be found as isolated mass in the stomach or may extend into the intestine. Trichobezoars mostly occur in young females with psychiatric disorders such as trichophagia and trichotillomania. CASE REPORT: Authors present a giant trichobezoar in an 18year old female presented with complaints of upper abdominal mass, epigastric area pain, anorexia and weight loss...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Waqas Ullah, Kaiser Saleem, Ejaz Ahmad, Faiz Anwer
Rapunzel syndrome is an extremely rare condition associated with trichophagia (hair eating disorder) secondary to a psychiatric illness called trichotillomania (hair-pulling behaviour). It is most commonly seen in children and adolescents. Untreated cases can lead to a number of complications. We present a case of a middle-aged woman with sudden intractable vomiting and constipation associated with bilateral pedal oedema and significant weight loss. Laboratory investigations revealed low serum protein levels...
2016: BMJ Case Reports
Jon E Grant, Sarah A Redden, Eric W Leppink, Samuel R Chamberlain
BACKGROUND: Trichotillomania appears to be a fairly common disorder, with high rates of co-occurring anxiety disorders. Many individuals with trichotillomania also report that pulling worsens during periods of increased anxiety. Even with these clinical links to anxiety, little research has explored whether trichotillomania with co-occurring anxiety is a meaningful subtype. METHODS: One hundred sixty-five adults with trichotillomania were examined on a variety of clinical measures including symptom severity, functioning, and comorbidity...
September 16, 2016: Comprehensive Psychiatry
Jennifer R Alexander, David C Houghton, Michael P Twohig, Martin E Franklin, Stephen M Saunders, Angela M Neal-Barnett, Scott N Compton, Douglas W Woods
The Milwaukee Inventory for Subtypes of Trichotillomania-Adult Version (MIST-A; Flessner et al., 2008) measures the degree to which hair pulling in Trichotillomania (TTM) can be described as "automatic" (i.e., done without awareness and unrelated to affective states) and/or "focused" (i.e., done with awareness and to regulate affective states). Despite preliminary evidence in support of the psychometric properties of the MIST-A, emerging research suggests the original factor structure may not optimally capture TTM phenomenology...
October 2016: Journal of Obsessive-compulsive and related Disorders
Lancelot Marique, Michel Wirtz, Arnaud Henkens, Emilie Delchambre, Monfred Rezaï, Christian Venet, Jean-Pierre Staudt
Trichotillomania and trichotillophagia can cause the formation of enormous intragastric hairballs. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl who was brought to the emergency service for evaluation of an acute abdomen. Abdominal CT scanner showed a giant gastric trichobezoar which had to be removed by susombilical laparotomy and transverse gastrotomy. This case illustrates the fairly uncommon perforation risk of these gastric bezoars.
September 22, 2016: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery: Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
Tian Hao Zhu, Mio Nakamura, Benjamin Farahnik, Michael Abrouk, Jason Reichenberg, Tina Bhutani, John Koo
Individuals with obsessive-compulsive features frequently visit dermatologists for complaints of the skin, hair, or nails, and often progress towards a chronic relapsing course due to the challenge associated with accurate diagnosis and management of their psychiatric symptoms. The current DSM-5 formally recognizes body dysmorphic disorder, trichotillomania, neurotic excoriation, and body focused repetitive behavior disorder as psychodermatological disorders belonging to the category of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Dermatological Treatment
Enzo Errichetti, Giuseppe Stinco
Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), erythrodermas (due to psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pityriasis rubra pilaris and scabies), noninfectious balanitis (Zoon's plasma cell balanitis, psoriatic balanitis, seborrheic dermatitis and non-specific balanitis) and erythroplasia of Queyrat, inflammatory cicatricial alopecias (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and folliculitis decalvans), nonscarring alopecias (alopecia areata, trichotillomania, androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium) and scaling disorders of the scalp (tinea capitis, scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis and pityriasis amiantacea)...
September 9, 2016: Dermatology and Therapy
Jon E Grant, Samuel R Chamberlain
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 1, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Colin M Brand, Klaree J Boose, Erica C Squires, Linda F Marchant, Frances J White, Audra Meinelt, J Josh Snodgrass
Hair plucking has been observed in many captive primate species, including the great apes; however, the etiology of this behavioral pattern is poorly understood. While this behavior has not been reported in wild apes, an ethologically identical behavior in humans, known as trichotillomania, is linked to chronic psychosocial stress and is a predominantly female disorder. This study examines hair plucking (defined here as a rapid jerking away of the hair shaft and follicle by the hand or mouth, often accompanied by inspection and consumption of the hair shaft and follicle) in a captive group of bonobos (N = 13) at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Columbus, Ohio...
September 2016: Zoo Biology
Jon E Grant, Eric W Leppink, Jerry Tsai, Samuel R Chamberlain, Sarah A Redden, Erin E Curley, Brian L Odlaug, Nancy J Keuthen
BACKGROUND: Trichotillomania (TTM) and skin-picking disorder (SPD) have been characterized as body-focused repetitive behavior disorders (BFRBs). Because BFRBs frequently co-occur, we sought to discover the similarities and differences for individuals having both TTM and SPD as opposed to 1 of these disorders. METHODS: Participants with primary TTM (N = 421) were evaluated regarding the comorbidity of SPD, and participants with primary SPD (N = 124) were evaluated regarding the comorbidity of TTM...
August 2016: Annals of Clinical Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists
Matilde Iorizzo, Arnold P Oranje
INTRODUCTION: Treatment options for hair disorders are generally very limited. These options are even more limited in children due to the lack of trials and clinical research. Moreover, physicians are sometimes scared to treat children with drugs without safety data, especially because most hair disorders are benign. AREAS COVERED: The objective of this paper is to review current and future treatments for alopecia areata and trichotillomania, two disorders that are sometimes encountered in differential diagnosis or even occur together and probably affect the mental condition of the patient involved more than others...
September 2016: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Jana Zímová, Pavlína Zímová
Trichotillomania (TTM) is defined by the Diagnostics and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DMS-IV) as hair loss from a patient`s repetitive self-pulling of hair. The disorder is included under anxiety disorders because it shares some obsessive-compulsive features. Patients have the tendency towards feelings of unattractiveness, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem (1,2). It is a major psychiatric problem, but many patients with this disorder first present to a dermatologist. An 11-year-old girl came to our department with a 2-month history of diffuse hair loss on the frontoparietal and parietotemporal area (Figure 1)...
June 2016: Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica: ADC
Ger P J Keijsers, Joyce Maas, Amras van Opdorp, Agnes van Minnen
People with trichotillomania often have persistent negative beliefs about giving into one's habit. Central in the present study was the hypothesis that the follow-up effects of cognitive therapy (CT), in which these negative beliefs are directly addressed, are better compared to the follow-up effects of behaviour therapy (BT). Fifty-six trichotillomania patients were randomly assigned to either six sessions CT or BT. Forty-eight completed their treatment. Follow-up measurements took place after a 3 months treatment-free period, and at 12 and 24 months...
2016: Cognitive Therapy and Research
Marcia S Stevens, Susan O'Conner-Von
Adolescents who struggle with trichotillomania (TTM; hairpulling disorder) are not alone, their parents also struggle. The focus of this qualitative study was to identify what parents (N = 30) perceive as stressful about parenting an adolescent with TTM and how they cope with these stressors. Parents described uncertainty about the course of the disorder and powerlessness in the ability to protect their adolescent from the reactions of others or assist them in curtailing the hairpulling as very distressing...
July 25, 2016: Journal of School Nursing: the Official Publication of the National Association of School Nurses
Yee Ian Yik, Ann Kee How
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
Dharmendra Goyal, Sandarsh Surya, Joshua Elder, William V Mccall, Krystle Graham
We report a case of sleep-isolated trichotillomania admitted to the hospital for alcohol detoxification. It would be helpful for patients with sleep-isolated trichotillomania to have diagnostic polysomnography to identify any other sleep-related pathology and correlate sleep-isolated trichotillomania behaviors with the sleep cycle to identify specific treatment for sleep-isolated trichotillomania.
January 2016: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience
Elias Aboujaoude, Wael O Salame
Addiction is a major public health problem with few efficacious and safe treatments. The goal of this review is to provide an evidence-based assessment of the therapeutic role of the opioid antagonist naltrexone across the addiction spectrum-substance-based and behavioral. The PubMed database was searched for randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials that investigated the oral or intramuscular long-acting formulation of naltrexone in substance use disorders or behavioral addictions such as pathological gambling, kleptomania, and trichotillomania...
August 2016: CNS Drugs
P Caiazzo, P Di Lascio, A Crocoli, I Del Prete
Trichobezoar is a rare pathology in which swallowed hairs accumulate in the stomach. An unusual form of bezoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine or beyond has been described as Rapunzel syndrome. Trichobezoars typically cause abdominal pain and nausea, but can also present as an asymptomatic abdominal mass, progressing to abdominal obstruction and perforation. Trichobezoar with Rapunzel syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis. It is predominantly found in emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded young people...
March 2016: Il Giornale di Chirurgia
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