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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210454/managing-patients-taking-edoxaban-in-dentistry
#1
REVIEW
Adrian Curto, Daniel Curto, Jorge Sanchez
BACKGROUND: Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. A new group of oral anticoagulants with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. The Food and Drug Administration has approved edoxaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life...
February 2017: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210451/dental-management-of-patients-taking-novel-oral-anticoagulants-noas-dabigatran
#2
REVIEW
Adrian Curto, Alberto Albaladejo, Alfonso Alvarado
BACKGROUND: A new group of oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants are at higher risk for bleeding when undergoing dental treatments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A literature search was conducted through April 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords "dabigatran", "rivaroxaban", "apixaban", "edoxaban", "new oral anticoagulants", "novel oral anticoagulants", "bleeding" and "dental treatment"...
February 2017: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208197/reversal-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-current-status-and-future-directions
#3
Jeffrey I Weitz
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In phase III clinical trials that included more than 100,000 patients, the DOACs were at least as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and were associated with less serious bleeding, particularly less intracranial bleeding. Real-world evidence supports these outcomes. Despite this, some physicians and patients are concerned about serious bleeding or emergencies unless specific reversal agents for the DOACs are available...
February 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198201/clinical-implications-of-reversal-agents-for-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#4
Sarah Monagle, John W Eikelboom, Kuan H Ng, Vinai C Bhagirath
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are effective in preventing and treating venous thromboembolism, and preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation. Until recently, there has been no specific reversal agent for DOACs. Now, a specific antidote for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran has been approved for use, and antidotes for factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) are being developed. We review the evidence for currently used and emerging reversal strategies, and discuss possible clinical implications, including increased prescription of DOACs, use of DOACs in clinical situations previously felt to pose too great a risk of bleeding, and use of reversal agents beyond currently approved indications...
March 2017: Future Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196633/old-and-new-oral-anticoagulants-food-herbal-medicines-and-drug-interactions
#5
REVIEW
Alessandro Di Minno, Beatrice Frigerio, Gaia Spadarella, Alessio Ravani, Daniela Sansaro, Mauro Amato, Joseph P Kitzmiller, Mauro Pepi, Elena Tremoli, Damiano Baldassarre
The most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulants worldwide are the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of VKAs are important because deviations from their narrow therapeutic window can result in bleedings due to over-anticoagulation or thrombosis because of under-anticoagulation. In addition to pharmacodynamic interactions (e.g., augmented bleeding risk for concomitant use of NSAIDs), interactions with drugs, foods, herbs, and over-the-counter medications may affect the risk/benefit ratio of VKAs...
February 5, 2017: Blood Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191610/italian-intersociety-consensus-on-doac-use-in-internal-medicine
#6
Domenico Prisco, Walter Ageno, Cecilia Becattini, Armando D'Angelo, Giovanni Davì, Raimondo De Cristofaro, Francesco Dentali, Giovanni Di Minno, Anna Falanga, Gualberto Gussoni, Luca Masotti, Gualtiero Palareti, Pasquale Pignatelli, Roberto M Santi, Francesca Santilli, Mauro Silingardi, Antonella Tufano, Francesco Violi
The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are drugs used in clinical practice since 2009 for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. The four DOACs, including the three factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) provide oral anticoagulation therapy alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Despite their clear advantages, the DOACs require on the part of the internist a thorough knowledge of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics to ensure their correct use, laboratory monitoring and the appropriate management of adverse events...
February 13, 2017: Internal and Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185212/economic-evaluations-of-new-oral-anticoagulants-for-the-prevention-of-venous-thromboembolism-after-total-hip-or-knee-replacement-a-systematic-review
#7
REVIEW
James Brockbank, Sorrel Wolowacz
BACKGROUND: Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries are being performed with increasing regularity and are associated with a high risk of developing a venous thromboembolism (VTE). New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) may be more effective at preventing VTEs but are associated with more bleeding events versus traditional anticoagulants. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review was to identify published economic analyses of NOACs for primary VTE prophylaxis following THR and TKR surgeries, and to summarise the modelling techniques used and the cost-effectiveness results...
February 10, 2017: PharmacoEconomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28122753/edoxaban-a-direct-oral-anticoagulant
#8
REVIEW
Mara Poulakos, Jacqueline N Walker, Umima Baig, Tosin David
PURPOSE: The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, safety, and place in therapy of edoxaban for prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) are reviewed. SUMMARY: Although warfarin has been an established therapy for stroke prevention in AF and VTE, the need for agents with less monitoring requirements, fewer food and drug interactions, and a lower risk of major bleeding led to the development of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs)...
February 1, 2017: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074293/-management-of-noak-administration-during-invasive-or-surgical-interventions-when-and-how-to-pause-and-when-to-restart
#9
M Buerke, H M Hoffmeister
Many patients under oral anticoagulation therapy need percutaneous or surgical interventions/operations. For vitamin K antagonists (VKA), there are recommendations regarding preoperative or postoperative administration. Management of the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) was supposed to be easier - but some aspects must be considered. Due to the different pharmacokinetic profiles of substances such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, different recommendations are given.Upon periprocedural management, thromboembolic risk has to be considered in patients treated with NOACs...
January 10, 2017: Medizinische Klinik, Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058458/-vitamin-k-antagonists-is-their-prescription-really-medical-malpractice-%C3%A2-today
#10
E Rafflenbeul, J Müller-Ehmsen
Atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolisms are frequent cardiovascular diseases. Until a few years ago only vitamin K antagonists (VKA) were available for oral anticoagulation as primary and secondary prevention of thrombembolic events. Currently, the non-vitamin K dependent new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are approved for use. The approval studies, meta-analyses and data from registries provide evidence for the superiority of NOAC vs. VKA with respect to reduction of thrombembolisms and reduced bleeding complications; therefore, in the 2016 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines the use of NOAC is recommended as first line therapy for anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation (recommendation grade I/evidence level A)...
January 2017: Der Internist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050755/effect-of-major-gastrointestinal-tract-surgery-on-the-absorption-and-efficacy-of-direct-acting-oral-anticoagulants-doacs
#11
REVIEW
Hakeam A Hakeam, Nasser Al-Sanea
Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism. Many patients undergoing major gastrointestinal resections or bypass receive anticoagulants for various indications, including the treatment of thrombotic complication of surgery and prevention of visceral vessels events recurrence. DOACs have a wide therapeutic range that allows fixed dosing determined based on studies conducted in healthy subjects with normal absorptive capacity...
January 3, 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28029411/atrial-fibrillation-and-heart-failure-factors-influencing-the-choice-of-oral-anticoagulant
#12
REVIEW
Louise A E Brown, Christopher J Boos
Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) frequently coexist. AF is identified in approximately one third of patients with HF and is linked to increased morbidity and mortality than from either condition alone. AF is relatively more common in HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) than with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Nevertheless, the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SSE) is significantly increased with both HF types and the absolute risk is heavily influenced by the presence and severity of associated additional stroke risk factors...
September 30, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28008269/perioperative-management-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-doacs-a-systemic-review
#13
REVIEW
Tagore Sunkara, Emmanuel Ofori, Vadim Zarubin, Megan E Caughey, Vinaya Gaduputi, Madhavi Reddy
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are in wide use among patients requiring both short- and long-term anticoagulation, mainly due to their ease of use and the lack of monitoring requirements. With growing use of DOACs, it is imperative that physicians be able to manage patients on these medications, especially in the perioperative period. We aim to provide guidance on the management of DOACs in the perioperative period. In this review, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing the management of patients on direct-acting anticoagulants in the perioperative period...
2016: Health Services Insights
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28007305/non-vitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants-in-atrial-fibrillation-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease-a-systematic-review-and-network-meta-analysis
#14
Giuseppe Andò, Piera Capranzano
BACKGROUND: Currently there is lack of head-to-head comparisons between different Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs), especially in more risky subgroups, as those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: We assessed the relative efficacy and safety of the four NOACs on the market in a systematic review and network meta-analysis of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and moderate CKD enrolled in the phase 3 randomized trials. A Bayesian framework was used to perform the network meta-analysis...
March 15, 2017: International Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27999513/choosing-non-vitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants-practical-considerations-we-need-to-know
#15
REVIEW
Alpesh Amin
BACKGROUND: Warfarin is a well-established agent for use in the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic event (SEE) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, management of patients requiring oral anticoagulation with warfarin can be complicated by the need for frequent monitoring, drug-drug and drug-food interactions, and a variable response based on genetic polymorphisms. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were developed as alternatives to warfarin; they do not require routine monitoring and have predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug-drug interactions, and limited drug-food interactions...
2016: Ochsner Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27988438/detection-of-lupus-anticoagulant-in-the-era-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#16
REVIEW
Ariela Hoxha, Alessandra Banzato, Amelia Ruffatti, Vittorio Pengo
Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) is an in vitro phenomenon determining a phospholipid-dependent elongation of clotting times. The presence of LAC associated with anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies is strongly associated with thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) targeting thrombin and factor Xa are currently widely use to prevent and treat venous and arterial thromboembolism. Some concern has, however, been expressed about the possibility of false laboratory results during LAC assessment in patients taking these drugs...
February 2017: Autoimmunity Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986971/management-of-bleeding-in-patients-receiving-non-vitamin-k-antagonists
#17
REVIEW
Sudarshan Balla, Scott Koerber, Greg Flaker
Anticoagulation with non-vitamin K antagonists (Non vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOACs)) including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban is at least as effective as warfarin, has fewer drug and food interactions and does not require monthly monitoring. Although major bleeding with NOACs is infrequent, there remains concern about the ability to effectively treat episodes of major bleeding. New agents have been developed that are capable of providing rapid reversal of the anticoagulation effect of NOACs...
December 16, 2016: Postgraduate Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27983747/laboratory-and-clinical-monitoring-of-direct-acting-oral-anticoagulants-what-clinicians-need-to-know
#18
Susan E Conway, Andrew Y Hwang, Charles D Ponte, John G Gums
The direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and equal or superior efficacy and an improved safety profile compared with warfarin. Noted shortcomings with DOACs are shorter half-lives requiring stricter adherence, lack of standardized laboratory monitoring, lack of anticoagulation reversal agents, and loss of routine coagulation monitoring leading to fewer patient-clinician interactions...
December 16, 2016: Pharmacotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27941401/new-standards-of-care-in-ischemic-stroke
#19
Bree K Chancellor, Koto Ishida
BACKGROUND: Ischemic arterial strokes of the ophthalmic artery and its branches and posterior cerebral artery are common causes of visual disability. Etiologies of stroke affecting the retina, optic nerve, optic radiation, and visual cortex overlap with other types of ischemic strokes. Stenosis of the internal carotid is the most common cause of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). One-fourth of patients with CRAO have cerebral strokes. We report recent developments in the acute treatment and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke of relevance to clinicians who encounter patients with acute vision loss...
December 8, 2016: Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology: the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917690/pharmacological-management-of-pulmonary-embolism
#20
Bobby Gouin, Helia Robert-Ebadi, Marc Righini, Marc Blondon
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially severe manifestation of venous thromboembolism. Its management has relied on anticoagulation by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for the past fifty years. Recently, new alternative drugs have been developed and dramatically modified both the treatment of acute PE and its secondary prevention. Areas covered: This review discusses the contemporary pharmacological treatment for PE, with a focus on anticoagulation options for non-high risk PE. In particular, the advent of direct oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran) and modalities for long-term prevention will be described...
January 2017: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
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