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Apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, dabigatran

Luke S Howard
Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common cardiopulmonary emergency that is a major cause of hospitalization and morbidity and is the primary cause of mortality associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). During the last decade, one of the biggest changes in the management of PE has been the approval of four non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs; apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban) for the treatment of PE and deep vein thrombosis and secondary prevention of VTE. Areas covered: This article reviews the evolving management of PE in the NOAC era and addresses three fundamental questions: who should receive NOACs over conventional heparin/vitamin K antagonist regimens for the treatment of acute PE; whether patients should be treated as inpatients or outpatients; and how long patients should be treated to reduce the risk of recurrence? Expert commentary: The management of PE is changing...
March 15, 2018: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
John Burn, Munir Pirmohamed
About 1.4 British million people are at risk of strokes due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) necessitating long-term anticoagulation. The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, has a long half-life and narrow therapeutic range necessitating regular monitoring and is a common cause of iatrogenic hospital admission. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are not required to have monitoring but are sensitive to changes in renal function and are associated with poorer adherence...
2018: Open Heart
Andrew Bromley, Anna Plitt
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a very common disorder with high risk for recurrence and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have been shown to be noninferior to conventional anticoagulant therapy for the prevention of recurrent VTE and are associated with more favorable bleeding risk. Evidence from the treatment of VTE with traditional therapy (low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists) implies that extended or indefinite treatment reduces risk of recurrence...
March 10, 2018: Cardiology and Therapy
Jordanne Feldberg, Param Patel, Ashley Farrell, Sylvia Sivarajahkumar, Karen Cameron, Jennifer Ma, Marisa Battistella
Background: There is a lack of clear benefit and a potential risk of bleeding with direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate how treatment with DOACs affects stroke and bleeding outcomes compared with warfarin or aspirin. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and case series, and searched electronic databases from 1946 to 2017...
March 2, 2018: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Kevin Fortier, Deepti Shroff, Uday N Reebye
BACKGROUND: Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are approved novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) as alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKA). Physicians are prescribing an ever-increasing amount these drugs to their patients due to various advantages over existing medications. AIMS: The objective of this review is to provide the dental professional with current literature surrounding the emergence of NOACs, as well as various case studies on the subject, in an effort to guide clinical decision making regarding these medications...
February 28, 2018: Gerodontology
José Francisco Kerr Saraiva
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an established risk factor for a first or recurrent stroke. Despite proven efficacy in preventing stroke in patients with AF, warfarin is underused, partly due to safety concerns. Recent randomized trials have shown that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) such as dabigatran (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and apixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban (factor Xa inhibitors) are not only non-inferior or superior to warfarin but also demonstrate a decreased risk of cerebrovascular bleeding among patients with AF and moderate to high risk of stroke...
February 27, 2018: Cardiology and Therapy
Carolin Hoyer, Alexandra Filipov, Eva Neumaier-Probst, Kristina Szabo, Anne Ebert, Angelika Alonso
BACKGROUND: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have gained increasing importance for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). With changing prescription practice, among other factors, clinicians can expect to see rising numbers of patients with ischemic stroke and pre-existing NOAC therapy. Few data exist regarding a potential impact of NOAC on stroke severity and outcome. AIMS: To evaluate the impact of pre-admission NOAC therapy on ischemic stroke severity...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Daniel Caldeira, Raquel Rodrigues, Daisy Abreu, Ana Marta Anes, Mário M Rosa, Joaquim J Ferreira
OBJECTIVE: In this pharmacovigilance study, we aimed to determine the incidence of spontaneously reported suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to oral anticoagulants: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs; apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban) and vitamin K antagonists (VKA) Research design and methods: In this retrospective observational study, we extracted all the individual case safety reports related to oral anticoagulants recorded in the Portuguese Pharmacovigilance Database (January 2010 to April 2015)...
February 20, 2018: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety
Robert C Gosselin, Dorothy M Adcock, Shannon M Bates, Jonathan Douxfils, Emmanuel J Favaloro, Isabelle Gouin-Thibault, Cecilia Guillermo, Yohko Kawai, Edelgard Lindhoff-Last, Steve Kitchen
This guidance document was prepared on behalf of the International Council for Standardization in Haematology (ICSH) for providing haemostasis-related guidance documents for clinical laboratories. This inaugural coagulation ICSH document was developed by an ad hoc committee, comprised of international clinical and laboratory direct acting oral anticoagulant (DOAC) experts. The committee developed consensus recommendations for laboratory measurement of DOACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), which would be germane for laboratories assessing DOAC anticoagulation...
February 12, 2018: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Zhouling Xie, Yongbing Tian, Xiao Lv, Xuan Xiao, Meimiao Zhan, Kai Cheng, Shiyu Li, Chenzhong Liao
Anticoagulants have exhibited a critical role in the prevention and/or treatment of thrombotic diseases. Up to now, kinds of novel oral anticoagulants, inhibiting plasma serine proteases in the coagulation cascade, have been developed to overcome the clinical limitations of classical anticoagulants (like warfarin and heparins). Some of them, such as Apixaban, Rivaroxaban, Edoxaban, and Dabigatran, have been approved by FDA in recent years. This review summarizes the discovery and optimization of representative novel oral anticoagulants with the aim to improve selectivity and bioavailability of compounds...
February 25, 2018: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Jan Beyer-Westendorf
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a substantial clinical and health-economic burden worldwide and effective anticoagulant treatment is necessary immediately after VTE is suspected to reduce short- and long-term VTE related morbidity and mortality. For decades, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux and Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have been the standard of anticoagulant therapy for VTE patients but these treatment options had clinically relevant drawbacks and limitations. The introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that specifically inhibit either thrombin or factor Xa have resolved many of these drawbacks because these new compounds exhibit a rapid onset and offset of action, fewer food and drug interactions and a predictable anticoagulant effect...
January 26, 2018: Thrombosis Research
T Exner, N Michalopoulos, J Pearce, R Xavier, M Ahuja
AIM: To evaluate a simple method using an adsorbent product (DOAC Stop) for extracting direct oral anti-coagulants (DOACs) from plasmas. METHOD: DOAC Stop was tested on normal and a range of abnormal plasmas initially using activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests and a more DOAC-sensitive Russells viper venom-based clotting test (DOAC Test). Further tests for prothrombin time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR), lupus anticoagulants, activated protein C (APC) resistance, antithrombin, plasminogen, protein C and S were carried out on various patient samples...
January 30, 2018: Thrombosis Research
Alan Sugrue, Konstantinos C Siontis, Jonathan P Piccini, Peter A Noseworthy
Catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an established first-line approach to the management of drug-refractory AF. Although, advancements in procedural techniques and technology have improved the efficacy and safety of CA, thromboembolism (TE) remains one of the most feared periprocedural complications. Minimizing the risk of TE during and after CA requires a multifaceted approach, in which periprocedural anticoagulation plays a central role. The goal of anticoagulation before, during, and after CA is to minimize TE risk without excessively increasing the risk of adverse bleeding...
January 25, 2018: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine
Gian Galeazzo Riario Sforza, Francesco Gentile, Fabio Stock, Francesco Caggiano, Enrica Chiocca, Cristoforo Incorvaia
The recent introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban, for the acute treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism and in atrial fibrillation has been shown to provide greater clinical benefit than oral vitamin K antagonists. However, direct oral anticoagulants are associated with adverse events, the most common being major bleeding; such events require the reversal of the anticoagulant effects by specific agents. In this case report, we describe an 87-year-old female with atrial fibrillation treated with dabigatran who had massive rectal bleeding...
2018: SAGE Open Medical Case Reports
Jerrold H Levy, James Douketis, Jeffrey I Weitz
The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) include dabigatran, which inhibits thrombin, and apixaban, betrixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, which inhibit coagulation factor Xa. Although clinical studies of NOACs were conducted without antidotes, patient outcomes with major bleeding when receiving NOACs were no worse than those in patients treated with a vitamin K antagonist. Nonetheless, in patients with life-threatening bleeding or requiring urgent surgery, the capacity for rapid NOAC reversal is likely to increase patient safety...
January 18, 2018: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
Sean T Chen, Manesh R Patel
In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), oral anticoagulation is important for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism (SE). While Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have historically been the standard of care, these medications are limited by numerous food and drug interactions with onerous requirements for frequent monitoring and dose adjustments. Over the past decade, several novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been developed to directly inhibit factor IIa/thrombin (dabigatran) or activated factor X (apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban)...
January 13, 2018: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases
Viraj Suvarna
Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) has reached an exciting phase with a plethora of newer, potentially more efficacious and safer agents being introduced for physicians to select from. Dabigatran belongs to a class of anticoagulants called direct thrombin inhibitors, while rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban are direct Factor Xa inhibitors. Purely from a therapeutic endpoint perspective-based on the action of anticoagulants in reducing cardioembolic stroke-in clinical trials, one should look at whether a new anticoagulant in patients with AF prevents ischemic stroke...
October 2017: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Neus Lanau, Javier Mareque, Lluis Giner, Michel Zabalza
Background: Four novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) named dabigatran, rivaroxaban, edoxaban and apixaban have been recently introduced to overcome some of the drawbacks of existing anticoagulants. They have less interactions and do not require routine monitoring. However, there is not enough scientific data about the protocol to apply in these patients on DOACs undergoing dental treatment. Thus is necessary to evaluate the potential bleeding risk of these drugs, the possibility of thromboembolic events occurring if they are withdrawn or the need to change to heparin previously...
November 2017: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry
Ana Isabel Franco Moreno, Rosa María Martín Díaz, María José García Navarro
Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome...
December 30, 2017: Medicina Clínica
D A Sychev, A N Levanov, I V Tsomaya, I I Sinitsina, A V Vardanyan
In this review we present comparison of pharmacokinetics of novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, principles of selection of a regimen of their dosing for phase III clinical trials in patients with atrial fibrillation. Multiplicity of administration of NOAC depends on required level of anticoagulation, ability to maintain anticoagulation for 24 hours, relationship between minimal and maximal levels of equilibrium concentrations, efficacy and safety. Once a day administration of some drugs of this group is reasonable from positions of clinical pharmacology...
November 2017: Kardiologiia
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