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high altitud and training

Grégoire P Millet, Franck Brocherie, Raphael Faiss, Olivier Girard
The authors report that many LHTL studies in normobaric hypoxia (NH) "failed to show a positive outcome", which in our view is only partially true. In a cross-over design, we (Saugy et al. 2016) recently tested if LHTL in hypobaric hypoxia (HH) would lead to larger performance enhancement than in NH. Our hypothesis was that HH (i.e. natural altitude) would lead to larger enhancement than NH but the results were contrary to this hypothesis. So we cannot support the affirmation by Lundby & Robach that "natural altitude remains the best approach"...
October 17, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Ankit B Shah, Neil Coplan
Altitude plays an important role in cardiovascular performance and training for athletes. Whether it is mountaineers, skiers, or sea-level athletes trying to gain an edge by training or living at increased altitude, there are many potential benefits and harms of such endeavors. Echocardiographic studies done on athletes at increased altitude have shown evidence for right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, but no change in left ventricular ejection fraction. In addition, 10% of athletes are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension and high-altitude pulmonary edema...
2016: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine
Gidugu Himashree, Latika Mohan, Yogesh Singh
UNLABELLED: Context • High altitude (HA) is a psychophysiological stressor for natives of lower altitudes. Reducing the morbidity and optimizing the performance of individuals deployed in an HA region has been attempted and reported with varied results. Objective • The present study intended to explore the effects of comprehensive yogic practices on the health and performance of Indian soldiers deployed at HAs. Design • The research team designed a prospective, randomized, case-control study...
September 2016: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Anne-Fleur Gaston, Fabienne Durand, Emma Roca, Grégory Doucende, Ilona Hapkova, Enric Subirats
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) developed at sea-level on exercise responses at moderate acute altitude. METHODS: Twenty three subjects divided in three groups of individuals: highly trained with EIH (n = 7); highly trained without EIH (n = 8) and untrained participants (n = 8) performed two maximal incremental tests at sea-level and at 2,150 m. Haemoglobin O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2) and several ventilatory parameters were measured continuously during the tests...
2016: PloS One
Oliver Michael Shannon, Lauren Duckworth, Matthew John Barlow, David Woods, Jose Lara, Mario Siervo, John Paul O'Hara
Nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BRJ) increases plasma nitrite concentrations, lowers the oxygen cost (V⋅O2) of steady-state exercise and improves exercise performance in sedentary and moderately-trained, but rarely in well-trained individuals exercising at sea-level. BRJ supplementation may be more effective in a hypoxic environment, where the reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) is potentiated, such that well-trained and less well-trained individuals may derive a similar ergogenic effect. We conducted a randomised, counterbalanced, double-blind placebo controlled trial to determine the effects of BRJ on treadmill running performance in moderate normobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 2500 m altitude) in participants with a range of aerobic fitness levels...
September 30, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
Amador García-Ramos, Igor Štirn, Paulino Padial, Javier Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Blanca De la Fuente, Carmen Calderón, Juan Bonitch-Góngora, Katja Tomazin, Boro Strumbelj, Vojko Strojnik, Belén Feriche
This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach...
2016: PloS One
Domingo J Ramos-Campo, Jacobo A Rubio-Arias, Tomás Freitas, Arturo Camacho, José Fernando Jiménez-Diaz, Pedro E Alcaraz
The aim of this study was to analyze physical performance and physiological variables during High-Intensity Resistance Circuit Training (HRC) with the addition of two levels (moderate and high) of systemic hypoxia. Twelve resistance-trained young male subjects participated in the study. After a 6RM testing session, participants performed three randomized trials of HRC: normoxia (NORM: FiO2=0.21; ∼0 m altitude), moderate hypoxia (MH: FiO2=0.16; ∼2.100 m altitude) or high hypoxia (HH: FiO2=0.13; ∼3.800 m altitude), as controlled by a hypoxic generator...
July 19, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Amy L Woods, Avish P Sharma, Laura A Garvican-Lewis, Philo Saunders, Tony Rice, Kevin G Thompson
High altitude exposure can increase resting metabolic rate (RMR) and induce weight loss in obese populations, but there is a lack of research regarding RMR in athletes at moderate elevations common to endurance training camps. The present study aimed to determine whether four weeks of classical altitude training affects RMR in middle-distance runners. Ten highly-trained athletes were recruited for four weeks of endurance training undertaking identical programs at either 2200m in Flagstaff, Arizona (ALT, n=5) or 600m in Canberra, Australia (CON, n=5)...
August 24, 2016: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Jonas J Saugy, Laurent Schmitt, Sibylle Fallet, Raphael Faiss, Jean-Marc Vesin, Mattia Bertschi, Raphaël Heinzer, Grégoire P Millet
Saugy, Jonas J., Laurent Schmitt, Sibylle Fallet, Raphael Faiss, Jean-Marc Vesin, Mattia Bertschi, Raphaël Heinzer, and Grégoire P. Millet. Sleep disordered breathing during live high-train low in normobaric versus hypobaric hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2016.-The present study aimed to compare sleep disordered breathing during live high-train low (LHTL) altitude camp using normobaric hypoxia (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH). Sixteen highly trained triathletes completed two 18-day LHTL camps in a crossover designed study...
July 13, 2016: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
Billy Sperlich, Silvia Achtzehn, Markus de Marées, Henning von Papen, Joachim Mester
There is a debate on the optimal way of monitoring training loads in elite endurance athletes especially during altitude training camps. In this case report, including nine members of the German national middle distance running team, we describe a practical approach to monitor the psychobiological stress markers during 21 days of altitude training (~2100 m above sea-level) to estimate the training load and to control muscle damage, fatigue, and/or chronic overreaching. Daily examination included: oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, resting heart rate, body mass, body and sleep perception, capillary blood concentration of creatine kinase...
June 2016: Physiological Reports
Jon Peter Wehrlin, Bernard Marti, Jostein Hallén
Fore more than a decade, the live high-train low (LHTL) approach, developed by Levine and Stray-Gundersen, has been widely used by elite endurance athletes. Originally, it was pointed out, that by living at moderate altitude, athletes should benefit from an increased red cell volume (RCV) and hemoglobin mass (Hbmass), while the training at low altitudes should prevent the disadvantage of reduced training intensity at moderate altitude. VO2max is reduced linearly by about 6-8 % per 1000 m increasing altitude in elite athletes from sea level to 3000 m, with corresponding higher relative training intensities for the same absolute work load...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
O Shannon, M Barlow, L Duckworth, D R Woods, T Barker, A Grindrod, A Griffiths, J P O'Hara
The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a pre-loaded 1 500-m treadmill time trial, conducted in moderate normobaric hypoxia. 8 trained runners/triathletes (24±3 years, 73.2±8.1 kg, 182.5±6.5 cm, altitude specific V˙O2max: 52.9±5.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) completed 3 trials (the first as a familiarisation), involving 2, 15-min running bouts at 45% and 65% V˙O2max, respectively, and a 1 500-m time trial in moderate normobaric hypoxia equivalent to a simulated altitude of 2 500 m (FiO2~15%)...
September 2016: International Journal of Sports Medicine
Małgorzata Michalczyk, Miłosz Czuba, Grzegorz Zydek, Adam Zając, Józef Langfort
The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like "live high, train high" (LH-TH), "live high, train low" (LH-TL) or "intermittent hypoxic training" (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment...
2016: Nutrients
John P Porcari, Lauren Probst, Karlei Forrester, Scott Doberstein, Carl Foster, Maria L Cress, Katharina Schmidt
Altitude training and respiratory muscle training (RMT) have been reported to improve performance in elite and well-trained athletes. Several devices (altitude and RMT) have been developed to help athletes gain the competitive edge. The Elevation Training Mask 2.0 (ETM) purportedly simulates altitude training and has been suggested to increase aerobic capacity (VO2max), endurance performance, and lung function. Twenty-four moderately trained subjects completed 6 weeks of high-intensity cycle ergometer training...
June 2016: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
James T Webb, Thomas R Morgan, Sean D Sarsfield
INTRODUCTION: Earlier research described a linear relationship between the highest 1 min of oxygen consumption (Vo2) during a recurring physical activity and incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) during research chamber exposures to high altitude. The current effort was designed to determine if that relationship holds true at a lower altitude. METHODS: Male subjects (20) were exposed without prebreathe to 22,500 ft (6858 m; 314 mmHg; 6.1 psi) for 4 h while seated, nonambulatory the entire time, with echo-imaging at 16-min intervals (Non-Amb Echo), breathing 100% oxygen...
June 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Eugenio Picano, Patricia A Pellikka
Extravascular lung water (EVLW) is a key variable in heart failure management and prognosis, but its objective assessment remains elusive. Lung imaging has been traditionally considered off-limits for ultrasound techniques due to the acoustic barrier of high-impedance air wall. In pulmonary congestion however, the presence of both air and water creates a peculiar echo fingerprint. Lung ultrasound shows B-lines, comet-like signals arising from a hyper-echoic pleural line with a to-and-fro movement synchronized with respiration...
July 14, 2016: European Heart Journal
Chia-Hua Kuo, M Brennan Harris
Fat burning, defined by fatty acid oxidation into carbon dioxide, is the most described hypothesis to explain the actual abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training. This hypothesis is strengthened by evidence of increased whole-body lipolysis during exercise. As a result, aerobic training is widely recommended for obesity management. This intuition raises several paradoxes: first, both aerobic and resistance exercise training do not actually elevate 24 h fat oxidation, according to data from chamber-based indirect calorimetry...
July 2016: Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Jonas J Saugy, Laurent Schmitt, Anna Hauser, Guillaume Constantin, Roberto Cejuela, Raphael Faiss, Jon P Wehrlin, Jérémie Rosset, Neil Robinson, Grégoire P Millet
PURPOSE: We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study. METHODS: Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100-1200 m and lived at 2250 m (P i O2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Matthew W H Inness, François Billaut, Robert J Aughey
OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of live-high train-low on team-sport athlete physical capacity and the time-course for adaptation. DESIGN: Pre-post parallel-groups. METHODS: Fifteen Australian footballers were matched for Yo-Yo Intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-YoIR2) performance and assigned to LHTL (n=7) or control (Con; n=8). LHTL spent 19 nights (3×5 nights, 1×4 nights, each block separated by 2 nights at sea level) at 3000-m simulated altitude (FIO2: 0...
January 28, 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Ajay Risal, Kedar Manandhar, Are Holen, Timothy J Steiner, Mattias Linde
BACKGROUND: Headache disorders, anxiety and depression - the major disorders of the brain - are highly comorbid in the western world. Whether this is so in South Asia has not been investigated, but the question is of public-health importance to countries in the region. We aimed to investigate associations, and their direction(s), between headache disorders (migraine, tension-type headache [TTH] and headache on ≥15 days/month) and psychiatric manifestations (anxiety, depression and neuroticism), and how these might affect quality of life (QoL)...
2016: Journal of Headache and Pain
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