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Tdcs language

Alexandre Heeren, Charlotte Coussement, Élisabeth Colon
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that has undergone intensive research over the past decade with promising results. tDCS is based on the application of weak, direct current over the scalp, leading to cortical hypo- or hyperpolarization according to the specified parameters. Recent studies have shown that tDCS is able to induce potent changes in cortical excitability as well as to elicit long-lasting modifications in brain activity. Over the last decade, tDCS physiological mechanisms of action have been intensively investigated...
August 2016: Médecine Sciences: M/S
Felix Gervits, Sharon Ash, H Branch Coslett, Katya Rascovsky, Murray Grossman, Roy Hamilton
Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by gradual deterioration of language function. We investigated whether two weeks of daily transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) treatment would improve language abilities in six people with a non-fluent form of PPA. tDCS was applied in an unblinded trial at an intensity of 1.5mA for 20min/day over 10days. At the time of stimulation, patients were engaged in narrating one of several children's wordless picture stories. A battery of neuropsychological assessments was administered four times: at baseline, immediately following the 2-week stimulation period, and then 6-weeks and 12-weeks following the end of stimulation...
August 11, 2016: Brain and Language
Kerstin Spielmann, W Mieke E van de Sandt-Koenderman, Majanka H Heijenbrok-Kal, Gerard M Ribbers
BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising new technique to optimize the effect of regular Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) in the context of aphasia rehabilitation. The present study focuses on the effect of tDCS provided during SLT in the sub-acute stage after stroke. The primary aim is to evaluate the potential effect of tDCS on language functioning, specifically on word-finding, as well as generalization effects to verbal communication. The secondary aim is to evaluate its effect on social participation and quality of life, and its cost-effectiveness...
2016: Trials
Xin Zheng, Weiying Dai, David C Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can enhance or diminish cortical excitability levels depending on the polarity of the stimulation. One application of non-invasive brain-stimulation has been to modulate a possible inter-hemispheric disinhibition after a stroke. This disinhibition model has been developed mainly for the upper extremity motor system, but it is not known whether the language/speech-motor system shows a similar inter-hemispheric interaction...
July 25, 2016: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Rajani Sebastian, Kyrana Tsapkini, Donna C Tippett
BACKGROUND: The application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in chronic post stroke aphasia is documented in a substantial literature, and there is some new evidence that tDCS can augment favorable language outcomes in primary progressive aphasia. Anodal tDCS is most often applied to the left hemisphere language areas to increase cortical excitability (increase the threshold of activation) and cathodal tDCS is most often applied to the right hemisphere homotopic areas to inhibit over activation in contralesional right homologues of language areas...
June 13, 2016: NeuroRehabilitation
Peter E Turkeltaub, Mary K Swears, Anila M D'Mello, Catherine J Stoodley
BACKGROUND: Aphasia is an acquired deficit in the ability to communicate through language. Noninvasive neuromodulation offers the potential to boost neural function and recovery, yet the optimal site of neuromodulation for aphasia has yet to be established. The right posterolateral cerebellum is involved in multiple language functions, interconnects with left-hemisphere language cortices, and is crucial for optimization of function and skill acquisition, suggesting that cerebellar neuromodulation could enhance aphasia rehabilitation...
May 24, 2016: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Maria Cotelli, Rosa Manenti, Donata Paternicò, Maura Cosseddu, Michela Brambilla, Michela Petesi, Enrico Premi, Roberto Gasparotti, Orazio Zanetti, Alessandro Padovani, Barbara Borroni
Agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia is a neurodegenerative disorder specifically characterized by language deficits. A recent study has demonstrated a beneficial effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in combination with language training on naming accuracy in these patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the improvement of naming accuracy after tDCS during language training was related to regional grey matter (GM) density. Eighteen avPPA patients underwent a brain magnetic resonance imaging before receiving a treatment that consisted of tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during individualized language training (10 daily therapy sessions, 5 days per week from Monday to Friday)...
September 2016: Brain Topography
D Antonenko, A Flöel
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been successfully used in neuroscientific research to modulate cognitive functions. Recent studies suggested that improvement of behavioral performance is associated with tDCS-induced modulation of neuronal activity and connectivity. Thus, tDCS may also represent a promising tool for reconstitution of cognitive functions in the context of memory decline related to Alzheimer's disease or aphasia following stroke; however, evidence from randomized sham-controlled clinical trials is still scarce...
August 2016: Der Nervenarzt
Priyanka P Shah-Basak, Rachel Wurzman, Juliann B Purcell, Felix Gervits, Roy Hamilton
PURPOSE: Aphasia-acquired loss of the ability to understand or express language-is a common and debilitating neurological consequence of stroke. Evidence suggests that transcranial magnetic (TMS) or direct current stimulation (tDCS) can significantly improve language outcomes in patients with aphasia (PWA). However, the relative efficacy between TMS and tDCS has not yet been explored. Mechanistic and methodological differences, patient inclusion/exclusion criteria and experimental designs may influence observed treatment benefits...
May 2, 2016: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
R C Miall, J Antony, A Goldsmith-Sumner, S R Harding, C McGovern, J L Winter
It has been postulated recently that the cerebellum contributes the same prediction and learning functions to linguistic processing as it does towards motor control. For example, repetitive TMS over posterior-lateral cerebellum caused a significant loss in predictive language processing, as assessed by the latency of saccades to target items of spoken sentences, using the Visual World task. We aimed to assess the polarity-specific effects of cerebellar TDCS, hypothesising that cathodal TDCS should impair linguistic prediction, and anodal TDCS facilitate it...
June 2016: Neuropsychologia
Wolf-Dieter Heiss
The functional deficit after a focal brain lesion is determined by the localization and the extent of the tissue damage. Since destroyed tissue usually cannot be replaced in the adult human brain, improvement or recovery of neurological deficits can be achieved only by reactivation of functionally disturbed but morphologically preserved areas or by recruitment of alternative pathways within the functional network. The visualization of disturbed interaction in functional networks and of their reorganization in the recovery after focal brain damage is the domain of functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET)...
April 11, 2016: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Débora Muszkat, Guilherme Vanoni Polanczyk, Taciana G Costa Dias, André Russowsky Brunoni
OBJECTIVES: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that consists of applying a weak electric current over the scalp to modulate cortical excitability. tDCS has been extensively investigated in adults with psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to review the current literature regarding the use of tDCS in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of tDCS in children and adolescents from age 0 to 18 years with psychiatric disorders...
September 2016: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Margaret Sandars, Lauren Cloutman, Anna M Woollams
Anomia is a frequent and persistent symptom of poststroke aphasia, resulting from damage to areas of the brain involved in language production. Cortical neuroplasticity plays a significant role in language recovery following stroke and can be facilitated by behavioral speech and language therapy. Recent research suggests that complementing therapy with neurostimulation techniques may enhance functional gains, even amongst those with chronic aphasia. The current review focuses on the use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) as an adjunct to naming therapy for individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia...
2016: Neural Plasticity
Paola Marangolo, Valentina Fiori, Umberto Sabatini, Giada De Pasquale, Carmela Razzano, Carlo Caltagirone, Tommaso Gili
Several studies have already shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful tool for enhancing recovery in aphasia. However, no reports to date have investigated functional connectivity changes on cortical activity because of tDCS language treatment. Here, nine aphasic persons with articulatory disorders underwent an intensive language therapy in two different conditions: bilateral anodic stimulation over the left Broca's area and cathodic contralesional stimulation over the right homologue of Broca's area and a sham condition...
May 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Erika K Hussey, Nathan Ward, Kiel Christianson, Arthur F Kramer
Recent research demonstrates that performance on executive-control measures can be enhanced through brain stimulation of lateral prefrontal regions. Separate psycholinguistic work emphasizes the importance of left lateral prefrontal cortex executive-control resources during sentence processing, especially when readers must override early, incorrect interpretations when faced with temporary ambiguity. Using transcranial direct current stimulation, we tested whether stimulation of left lateral prefrontal cortex had discriminate effects on language and memory conditions that rely on executive-control (versus cases with minimal executive-control demands, even in the face of task difficulty)...
2015: PloS One
Antonino Leo, Rosario De Luca, Margherita Russo, Antonino Naro, Placido Bramanti, Rocco S Calabrò
Cognitive impairment after stroke is quite common and can cause important disability with a relevant impact on quality of life. Cognitive rehabilitation (CR) and related assistive technology may improve functional outcomes. A 30-year-old woman came to our research institute for an intensive CR cycle following a right parieto-temporal stroke. Because the patient was in the chronic phase, we decided to use 3 different rehabilitative protocols: (a) traditional cognitive training (TCT), (b) computerized cognitive training (CCT), and (c) CCT combined with transcranial direct stimulation (CCT plus) with a 2-week interval separating each session...
2016: Applied Neuropsychology. Adult
Barbara De Tommaso, Alessandro Piedimonte, Marcella M Caglio, Federico D'Agata, Marcello Campagnoli, Laura Orsi, Simona Raimondo, Sergio Vighetti, Paolo Mortara, Giuseppe Massazza, Lorenzo Pinessi
In this paper we report the effect of a combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and speech language therapy on linguistic deficits following left brain damage in a stroke case. We show that simultaneous electrical excitatory stimulation to the left and inhibitory stimulation to the right parietal regions (dual-tDCS) affected writing and reading rehabilitation, enhancing speech therapy outcomes. The results of a comparison with healthy controls showed that application of dual-tDCS could improve, in particular, sub-lexical transcoding and, specifically, the reading of non-words with increasing length and complexity...
October 22, 2015: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
A V Blesneag, L Popa, A D Stan
The new tendency in rehabilitation involves non-invasive tools that, if applied early after stroke, promote neurorecovery. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation may correct the disruption of cortical excitability and effectively contribute to the restoration of movement and speech. The present paper analyses the results of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) trials, highlighting different aspects related to the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation frequency, transcranial direct current stimulation polarity, the period and stimulation places in acute and subacute ischemic strokes...
2015: Journal of Medicine and Life
Elizabeth E Galletta, Amy Vogel-Eyny
BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive method of brain stimulation, is an adjunctive research-therapy for aphasia. The concept supporting translational application of tDCS is that brain plasticity, facilitated by language intervention, can be enhanced by non-invasive brain stimulation. This study combined tDCS with an ecologically focused behavioral approach that involved training nouns and verbs in sentences. METHOD: HASH(0x44b6910) PARTICIPANT: A 43-year-old, right-handed male with fluent-anomic aphasia who sustained a single-left-hemisphere-temporal-parietal stroke was recruited...
2015: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Sharona Vonck, Stephan Patrick Swinnen, Nicole Wenderoth, Kaat Alaerts
Perceiving human motion, recognizing actions, and interpreting emotional body language are tasks we perform daily and which are supported by a network of brain areas including the human posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). Here, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with anodal (excitatory) or cathodal (inhibitory) electrodes mounted over right pSTS (target) and orbito-frontal cortex (reference) while healthy participants performed a bodily emotion recognition task using biological motion point-light displays (PLDs)...
2015: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
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