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"Rapid Sequence Intubation"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149690/a-modified-montpellier-protocol-for-intubating-intensive-care-unit-patients-is-associated-with-an-increase-in-first-pass-intubation-success-and-fewer-complications
#1
Keith A Corl, Christopher Dado, Ankita Agarwal, Nader Azab, Tim Amass, Sarah J Marks, Mitchell M Levy, Roland C Merchant, Jason Aliotta
BACKGROUND: The Montpellier protocol for intubating patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with a decrease in intubation-related complications. We sought to determine if implementation of a simplified version of the Montpellier protocol that removed selected components and allowed for a variety of pre-oxygenation modalities increased first-pass intubation success and reduced intubation-related complications. METHODS: A prospective pre/post-comparison of a modified Montpellier protocol in two medical and one medical/surgical/cardiac ICU within a hospital system...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095178/changing-the-emergency-department-s-practice-of-rapid-sequence-intubation-to-reduce-the-incidence-of-hypoxia
#2
Michael D Gooch, Eric Roberts
Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is an advanced procedure performed by nurse practitioners in the emergency department (ED). Hypoxia is one of the most common complications associated with RSI, which may lead to serious sequela, including death. Hypoxia may result from medications that are given to facilitate the procedure or the underlying disease process. Without preventive measures, oxygen levels may fall rapidly when patients are no longer actively breathing. The incidence of RSI-induced hypoxia may be mitigated with proper education, preoxygenation, positioning, and the utilization of passive (apneic) oxygenation...
October 2017: Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29018000/waveform-capnography-an-alternative-to-physician-gestalt-in-determining-optimal-intubating-conditions-after-administration-of-paralytic-agents
#3
Anthony Scoccimarro, Jason R West, Marc Kanter, Nicholas D Caputo
PURPOSE: We sought to evaluate the utility of waveform capnography (WC) in detecting paralysis, by using apnoea as a surrogate determinant, as compared with clinical gestalt during rapid sequence intubation. Additionally, we sought to determine if this improves the time to intubation and first pass success rates through more consistent and expedient means of detecting optimal intubating conditions (ie, paralysis). METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study of consecutively enrolled patients was conducted from April to June 2016 at an academic, urban, level 1 trauma centre in New York City...
October 10, 2017: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28960597/ideal-cricoid-pressure-is-biomechanically-impossible-during-laryngoscopy
#4
Christopher E Trethewy, Steven R Doherty, Julie M Burrows, Don Clausen
OBJECTIVE: This study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) with cricoid pressure (CP) within the emergency department (ED). The primary aim of the study was to examine the link between ideal CP and the incidence of aspiration. METHOD: Patients > 18 years of age undergoing RSI in the ED of two hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, were randomly assigned to receive measured CP using weighing scales to target the ideal CP range (3...
September 28, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28917437/effects-of-intravenous-administration-of-fentanyl-and-lidocaine-on-hemodynamic-responses-following-endotracheal-intubation
#5
Amir Masoud Hashemian, Hamid Zamani Moghadam Doloo, Maziar Saadatfar, Roya Moallem, Maryam Moradifar, Raheleh Faramarzi, Mohammad Davood Sharifi
OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of intravenous fentanyl and lidocaine on hemodynamic changes following endotracheal intubation in patients requiring Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI) in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: A single-centered, prospective, simple non-randomized, double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 96 patients who needed RSI in Edalatian ED. They were randomly divided into three groups (fentanyl group (F), lidocaine group (L), and fentanyl plus lidocaine (M) as our control group)...
July 21, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28889210/ketamine-and-midazolam-differently-impact-post-intubation-hemodynamic-profile-when-used-as-induction-agents-during-emergency-airway-management-in-hemodynamically-stable-patients-with-st-elevation-myocardial-infarction
#6
Marco Zuin, Gianluca Rigatelli, Fabio Dell'Avvocata, Giuseppe Faggian, Luca Conte, Sara Giatti, Flavio Michielan, Loris Roncon
We investigated the incidence of post-intubation hypotension (PIH) in hemodynamically stable patients with STEMI requiring rapid sequences intubation (RSI) and medicated with ketamine or midazolam as induction agent. STEMI patients admitted between 1st January 2009 and 1st January 2017 who did not receive any type of inotropic support before the endotracheal intubation (ETI) was reviewed. PIH was defined as a reduction greater than 20% or a drop of systolic blood pressure (SBP) below 90 mmHg within 10 min from the administration of the induction agent [ketamine (1 mg/kg) or midazolam (0...
September 9, 2017: Heart and Vessels
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814478/effect-of-patient-weight-on-first-pass-success-and-neuromuscular-blocking-agent-dosing-for-rapid-sequence-intubation-in-the-emergency-department
#7
Asad E Patanwala, John C Sakles
OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between patient weight and first pass success (FPS) during rapid sequence intubation (RSI) in the ED. The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between patient weight and neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) dosing. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary care academic ED. Consecutive adult patients who underwent RSI in the ED between January 2014 and June 2016 were included...
August 16, 2017: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791775/maintenance-of-oxygenation-during-rapid-sequence-intubation-in-the-emergency-department
#8
John C Sakles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 9, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791755/emergency-department-use-of-apneic-oxygenation-versus-usual-care-during-rapid-sequence-intubation-a-randomized-controlled-trial-the-endao-trial
#9
Nicholas Caputo, Ben Azan, Rui Domingues, Lee Donner, Mark Fenig, Douglas Fields, Robert Fraser, Karlene Hosford, Richard Iuorio, Marc Kanter, Moira McCarty, Thomas Parry, Andaleeb Raja, Mary Ryan, Blaine Williams, Hemlata Sharma, Daniel Singer, Chris Shields, Sandra Scott, Jason R West
OBJECTIVES: Desaturation leading to hypoxemia may occur during rapid sequence intubation (RSI). Apneic oxygenation (AO) was developed to prevent the occurrence of oxygen desaturation during the apnea period. The purpose of this study was to determine if the application of AO increases the average lowest oxygen saturation during RSI when compared to usual care (UC) in the emergency setting. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted at an academic, urban, Level I trauma center...
August 9, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28759496/addition-of-nasal-cannula-can-either-impair-or-enhance-preoxygenation-with-a-bag-valve-mask-a-randomized-crossover-design-study-comparing-oxygen-flow-rates
#10
David McQuade, Matthew R Miller, Clare Hayes-Bradley
BACKGROUND: A critical safety component of emergency anesthesia is the avoidance of hypoxemia during the apneic phase of a rapid sequence intubation. Preoxygenation with a bag valve mask (BVM) or anesthetic circuit may be improved with supplemental oxygen by nasal cannula (NC) if there is a mask leak. In addition, NC is recommended for apneic oxygenation after induction and may be placed before preoxygenation. However, the optimum NC flow rate for preoxygenation or whether the presence of NC alone creates a mask leak remains unclear...
July 26, 2017: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28754359/the-continued-challenges-of-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation
#11
EDITORIAL
Henry E Wang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739243/heaven-criteria-derivation-of-a-new-difficult-airway-prediction-tool
#12
Daniel P Davis, David J Olvera
OBJECTIVE: Airway management is vitally important in the management of critically ill and injured patients. Current tools to predict the difficult airway have limited application in the emergency airway situation. The aim of this study was to derive a novel difficult airway prediction tool for emergency intubation. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive analysis was performed in a population of air medical rapid sequence intubation patients requiring more than 1 attempt...
July 2017: Air Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701350/effectiveness-of-interventions-to-improve-medication-use-during-rapid-sequence-intubation-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department
#13
Michelle C Caruso, Jenna R Dyas, Matthew R Mittiga, Andrea S Rinderknecht, Benjamin T Kerrey
PURPOSE: Results of a study to determine whether checklist-based interventions improved the selection and administration of rapid-sequence intubation (RSI) medications in a pediatric emergency department (ED) are reported. METHODS: A retrospective study of data collected during a quality-improvement project was conducted. Data sources included the electronic health record and video review. The central intervention was use of a 21-item RSI checklist, which included guidance for the physician team leader on medication selection and timing...
September 1, 2017: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28654173/rocuronium-vs-succinylcholine-for-rapid-sequence-intubation-a%C3%A2-cochrane-systematic-review
#14
REVIEW
D T T Tran, E K Newton, V A H Mount, J S Lee, C Mansour, G A Wells, J J Perry
This systemic review was performed to determine whether rocuronium creates intubating conditions comparable to those of succinylcholine during rapid sequence intubation of the trachea. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to February Week 2 2015), and EMBASE (1988 to February 14 2015) for any randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials that reported intubating conditions comparing rocuronium and succinylcholine for rapid or modified rapid sequence intubation...
June 2017: Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622071/survival-in-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-of-non-traumatic-brain-pathologies
#15
Pieter Francsois Fouche, Paul Andrew Jennings, Karen Smith, Malcolm Boyle, Gabriel Blecher, Jonathan Knott, Mani Raji, Pamela Rosengarten, Michael Roberto Augello, Stephen Bernard
INTRODUCTION: Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is not only used in traumatic brain injuries in the out-of-hospital setting, but also for non-traumatic brain pathologies (NTBP) such as brain tumors, meningitis, encephalitis, hypoxic/anoxic brain injury, stroke, arteriovenous malformations, tumors, aneurysms, brain hemorrhage, as well as brain injury due to diabetes, seizures and toxicity, metabolic conditions, and alcohol and drug overdose. Previous research suggests that RSI is common in non-traumatic coma, but with an unknown prevalence of NTBP in those that receive RSI...
November 2017: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601274/temporary-removal-rocuronium-should-be-the-default-paralytic-in-rapid-sequence-intubation
#16
Anand K Swaminathan, Haney Mallemat
The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. It was mistakenly published prior to its accompanying article. A replacement will appear as soon as possible. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal.
June 22, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559038/nonphysician-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-success-and-adverse-events-a%C3%A2-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#17
REVIEW
Pieter F Fouche, Christopher Stein, Paul Simpson, Jestin N Carlson, Suhail A Doi
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Rapid sequence intubation performed by nonphysicians such as paramedics or nurses has become increasingly common in many countries; however, concerns have been stated in regard to the safe use and appropriateness of rapid sequence intubation when performed by these health care providers. The aim of our study is to compare rapid sequence intubation success and adverse events between nonphysician and physician in the out-of-hospital setting. METHODS: A systematic literature search of key databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was conducted...
October 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219617/techniques-and-outcomes-of-emergency-airway-management-in-japan-an-analysis-of-two-multicentre-prospective-observational-studies-2010-2016
#18
MULTICENTER STUDY
Yukari Goto, Tadahiro Goto, Yusuke Hagiwara, Yusuke Tsugawa, Hiroko Watase, Hiroshi Okamoto, Kohei Hasegawa
OBJECTIVES: Continuous surveillance of emergency airway management practice is imperative in improving quality of care and patient safety. We aimed to investigate the changes in the practice of emergency airway management and the related outcomes in the emergency departments (EDs) in Japan. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of the data from two prospective, observational, multicentre registries of emergency airway management-the Japanese Emergency Airway Network (JEAN)-1 and -2 Registries from April 2010 through May 2016...
May 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169969/yet-another-absolute-indication-for-rapid-sequence-intubation
#19
Suparna Bharadwaj
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 6, 2017: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124199/the-effectiveness-of-rapid-sequence-intubation-rsi-versus-non-rsi-in-emergency-department-an-analysis-of-multicenter-prospective-observational-study
#20
Masashi Okubo, Koichiro Gibo, Yusuke Hagiwara, Yukiko Nakayama, Kohei Hasegawa
BACKGROUND: Although rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is the method of choice in emergency department (ED) airway management, data to support the use of RSI remain scarce. We sought to compare the effectiveness of airway management between RSI and non-RSI (intubation with sedative agents only or without medications) in the ED. METHODS: Secondary analysis of the data from a multicenter prospective observational registry at 13 Japanese EDs. All non-cardiac-arrest patients who underwent intubation with RSI or non-RSI were included for the analysis...
December 2017: International Journal of Emergency Medicine
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