Read by QxMD icon Read

Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms

Sophie Gohy, Antoine Froidure, Patrick Lebecque
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and severe side-effect, mainly described after intake of anticonvulsants, allopurinol, or antibiotics. It usually begins within 2 months after drug introduction. Symptoms include cutaneous rash, hematologic abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and the diagnosis might be challenging. This case report illustrates for the first time this life-threatening complication in a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this case, withdrawal of the offending drug was sufficient for full recovery...
October 14, 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
Zaw Min, Raquel R Garcia, Monika Murillo, Jeffrey M Uchin, Nitin Bhanot
Intravenous vancomycin is a widely used antibiotics, but it causes different types of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular rash, red-man syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, IgA bullous dermatosis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, Stevens-Johnsons syndrome, to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. We report an elderly patient with the end-stage renal disease presented with diffuse palpable purpura while receiving IV vancomycin therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia...
September 25, 2016: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Mahimanjan Saha, Surajit Gorai, Vaswatee Madhab
Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a type of severe adverse cutaneous drug reaction characterized by fever, skin eruption, hematological abnormalities, and internal organ involvement. Although anticonvulsant drugs are mainly implicated in DRESS, newer anticonvulsants such as oxcarbazepine-induced definite cases of DRESS syndrome are rare and oxcarbazepine-induced DRESS syndrome presenting as exfoliative dermatitis is even rarer. We report a case of a 35-year-old male who developed DRESS syndrome presenting as exfoliative dermatitis after taking oxcarbazepine for 3 weeks...
July 2016: Journal of Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics
Sergio Álvarez, Ignacio Delama, Lucas Navajas-Galimany, Gonzalo Eymin, M Elena Ceballos, Romina Andino-Navarrete
DRESS syndrome (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an adverse life-threatening drug reaction characterized by a polymorphous rash associated with fever, lymphadenopathy and multiorgan involvement with eosinophilia. We present the case of an immunocompetent man with DRESS syndrome secondary to carbamazepine, that developed concomitantly meningoencephalitis caused by human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6), and a review of literature. The pathogenic role of HHV-6 in DRESS syndrome remains controversial...
June 2016: Revista Chilena de Infectología: órgano Oficial de la Sociedad Chilena de Infectología
Prakruthi Voore, Chibuzo Odigwe, Aibek E Mirrakhimov, Dana Rifai, Nkemakolam A Iroegbu
The drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome also known as DRESS syndrome refers to an idiosyncratic drug reaction commonly characterized by rashes, fever, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. We report a case of this syndrome in a 40-year-old man presenting with a rash, generalized pruritus, lymphadenopathy, and eosinophilia after metformin treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking metformin to the DRESS syndrome. The patient improved remarkably with drug withdrawal...
August 17, 2016: American Journal of Therapeutics
Philip Simon Webb, Abdallah Al-Mohammad
A man aged 73 years with infective endocarditis presented with septic shock and was started on immediate antimicrobial therapy. His blood culture yielded no organism. Subsequently, he developed a severe allergic reaction to prolonged empirical vancomycin therapy. This manifested as fever, widespread maculopapular rash and severe progressive acute kidney injury ultimately requiring dialysis. In the context of eosinophilia, this was determined to be drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome...
August 29, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Zahra Karami, Mehrnaz Mesdaghi, Parvaneh Karimzadeh, Mahboubeh Mansouri, Mohammad Mehdi Taghdiri, Zarrintaj Kayhanidoost, Bita Jebelli, Reza Shekarriz Foumani, Delara Babaie, Zahra Chavoshzadeh
BACKGROUND/AIM: Administration of the anticonvulsant drugs phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine and lamotrigine can be associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) is a method to determine which drug has caused the hypersensitivity reaction. This study was done to evaluate the results of LTT in patients with delayed hypersensitivity reactions following the administration of anticonvulsants. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with hypersensitivity reactions, e...
2016: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Wiparat Manuyakorn, Surakameth Mahasirimongkol, Plernpit Likkasittipan, Wasu Kamchaisatian, Sukanya Wattanapokayakit, Wimala Inunchot, Anannit Visudtibhan, Nuanjun Wichukchinda, Suwat Benjaponpitak
OBJECTIVE: Phenobarbital hypersensitivity is one of the common drug hypersensitivity syndromes in children. Clinical symptoms of phenobarbital hypersensitivity vary from maculopapular rashes (MPs) to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) including drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Drug hypersensitivity has been demonstrated to be associated with variations in the HLA genotypes...
October 2016: Epilepsia
Choong Yi Fong, Nurmaira Hashim, Chin Seng Gan, Tak Kuan Chow, Chee Geap Tay
BACKGROUND: Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) predominantly aromatic AEDs are commonly reported in DRESS. To date there are no reports of sulthiame AED causing DRESS syndrome. METHOD: We report a 10-year-old girl of Indian descent with AED resistant epilepsy on maintenance sodium valproate and clonazepam. Sulthiame AED was initiated to try to improve her seizure control...
November 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology: EJPN
Jacqueline Martins de Sousa, Heloisa Nascimento, Rubens Belfort
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed...
May 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia
Hyunah Kim, Eun Sook Bang, Seung-Kwan Lim, Jae Myeong Lee
OBJECTIVE: To report a rare case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome caused by antituberculosis (TB) drugs, which progressed to acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) after moxifloxacin treatment. CASE SUMMARY: A 25-year-old female was hospitalized for dyspnea and dizziness. She had a history of TB and experienced rifampin-induced skin rash. She was treated for TB with moxifloxacin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide...
October 2016: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Noëlle Weingertner, Mona Mitcov, Marie-Pierre Chenard, Bernard Cribier
INTRODUCTION: We describe the case of a patient presenting with drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), where cutaneous biopsy revealed intravascular atypical lymphocytes suggestive of lymphoma. Case report A 77-year-old man was treated with antibiotics for a hip prosthesis infection. Eight weeks later, he developed a maculo-papulous eruption, edema of the extremities, fever and blood eosinophilia. Cutaneous biopsy revealed an atypical T-cell proliferation into the dermal lymphatic vessels...
July 19, 2016: Journal of Cutaneous Pathology
Rannakoe J Lehloenya, Sipho Dlamini, Rudzani Muloiwa, Betty Kakande, Mzudumile R Ngwanya, Gail Todd, Keertan Dheda
Elimination of a rifamycin from the treatment regimen for tuberculosis negatively impacts outcomes. Cross-reactivity between the rifamycins after drug eruptions is unclear. We report 6 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with rifampicin-associated drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome confirmed on diagnostic rechallenge. The patients subsequently tolerated rifabutin. These data inform clinical management of tuberculosis-associated drug reactions.
September 2016: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
Seyed Hasan Tonekaboni, Narjes Jafari, Zahra Chavoshzadeh, Bibi Shahin Shamsian, Nima Rezaei
DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome, which reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, presenting by generalized skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, atypical lymphocytosis, and internal organ involvement. Herein a 21-month old male infant with DRESS and Encephalopathy syndrome is presented who complicated after phenobarbital usage that persisted due to phenytoin cream usage. The case received phenobarbital after a seizure disorder presented as "status epilepticus"...
September 2015: Turkish Journal of Pediatrics
Robert J Smith, Markus D Boos, Patrick McMahon
A 9-year-old boy presented with fever, rash, anterior cervical lymphadenopathy, high liver enzymes, atypical lymphocytosis, and eosinophilia (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms [DRESS]). His history was notable for having taken griseofulvin for 3 weeks prior to onset of these findings. He improved after treatment with oral prednisone. We present a rare case of probable DRESS secondary to griseofulvin.
September 2016: Pediatric Dermatology
Marcos Silva-Feistner, Elena Ortiz, María Jesús Rojas-Lechuga, Daniel Muñoz
INTRODUCTION: Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare, potentially life-threatening, drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction that includes skin eruption, haematological abnormalities, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. OBJECTIVE: Presenting a rare condition in children, to facilitate a rapid diagnostic suspicion and recognition by doctors CASE REPORT: An 9 months old infant admitted due to a severe viral pneumonia, managed with non-invasive ventilation and ceftriaxone...
July 1, 2016: Revista Chilena de Pediatría
Hideharu Hagiya, Masaya Iwamuro, Takehiro Tanaka, Kou Hasegawa, Yoshihisa Hanayama, Maya Kimura, Fumio Otsuka
A 74-year-old man who had been administered trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for three weeks suffered from drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS). In the early stage of the clinical course, he developed renal dysfunction. A renal biopsy showed granulomatous tubulointerstitial nephritis accompanying the proliferation of human herpes virus (HHV)-6 in tubular epithelial cells. With corticosteroid therapy, the systemic rash and renal function gradually improved...
2016: Internal Medicine
Y-M Ye, G-Y Hur, S-H Kim, G-Y Ban, Y-K Jee, D J Naisbitt, H-S Park, S-H Kim
BACKGROUND: A multidrug regimen including isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol is commonly used as a first-line treatment for tuberculosis. However, these regimens can occasionally result in severe adverse drug reactions such as drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome and drug-induced liver injury. The culprit drug and mechanistic basis for the hypersensitive reaction are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate drug-specific T-cell responses in patients with ATD-induced cutaneous hypersensitivity and its underlying mechanism...
July 4, 2016: British Journal of Dermatology
Nasreen Hassoun-Kheir, Reuven Bergman, Sara Weltfriend
BACKGROUND: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common. In the absence of a sufficiently sensitive and specific laboratory test, identification of the culprit drug remains a diagnostic challenge. Patch tests have recently been advocated as a means of detecting drug sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: To further elucidate the usefulness of patch tests in revealing the causative drugs of cutaneous ADRs (CADRs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a non-blinded, prospective, controlled clinical trial...
July 1, 2016: International Journal of Dermatology
Heejeong Kang, Taek Ki Min, Hyeon-Jong Yang, Bok Yang Pyun
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"