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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324983/the-precuneus-may-encode-irrationality-in-human-gambling
#1
P Sacre, M S D Kerr, S Subramanian, K Kahn, J Gonzalez-Martinez, M A Johnson, S V Sarma, J T Gale
Humans often make irrational decisions, especially psychiatric patients who have dysfunctional cognitive and emotional circuitry. Understanding the neural basis of decision-making is therefore essential towards patient management, yet current studies suffer from several limitations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in humans have dominated decision-making neuroscience, but have poor temporal resolution and the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal is only a proxy for neural activity. On the other hand, lesion studies in humans used to infer functionality in decision-making lack characterization of neural activity altogether...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324757/perceptual-category-learning-and-visual-processing-an-exercise-in-computational-cognitive-neuroscience
#2
George Cantwell, Maximilian Riesenhuber, Jessica L Roeder, F Gregory Ashby
The field of computational cognitive neuroscience (CCN) builds and tests neurobiologically detailed computational models that account for both behavioral and neuroscience data. This article leverages a key advantage of CCN-namely, that it should be possible to interface different CCN models in a plug-and-play fashion-to produce a new and biologically detailed model of perceptual category learning. The new model was created from two existing CCN models: the HMAX model of visual object processing and the COVIS model of category learning...
March 6, 2017: Neural Networks: the Official Journal of the International Neural Network Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324737/neuroscience-intelligence-in-the-honeybee-mushroom%C3%A2-body
#3
Sophie Caron, Larry F Abbott
Intelligence, in most people's conception, involves combining pieces of evidence to reach non-obvious conclusions. A recent theoretical study shows that intelligence-like brain functions can emerge from simple neural circuits, in this case the honeybee mushroom body.
March 20, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324647/metabolism-and-distribution-of-clozapine-n-oxide-implications-for-nonhuman-primate-chemogenetics
#4
Jessica Raper, J Scott Daniels, Ryan D Morrison, Leonard Howell, Jocelyne Bachevalier, Thomas Wichmann, Adriana Galvan
The use of Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) in neuroscience has rapidly expanded in rodent studies, but has lagged behind in nonhuman primate (NHP) experiments, slowing the development of this method for therapeutic use in humans. One reason for the slow adoption of DREADD technology in primates is that the pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability of clozapine-n-oxide (CNO), the most commonly used ligand for human muscarinic (hM) DREADDs, are not fully described in primates...
March 21, 2017: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324600/light-sheet-fluorescence-microscopy-chemical-clearing-and-labeling-protocols-for-ultramicroscopy
#5
Nina Jährling, Klaus Becker, Saiedeh Saghafi, Hans-Ulrich Dodt
Light-sheet microscopy is an effective technique in neuroscience, developmental biology, and cancer research for visualizing and analyzing cellular networks and whole organs in three dimensions. Because this technique requires specimens to be translucent they commonly have to be cleared before microscopy inspection. Here, we provide 3DISCO based protocols for preparing cleared samples of immuno-stained neural networks, lectin-labeled vascular networks, and Methoxy-X04 labeled beta-amyloid plaques in mice. 3DISCO utilizes the lipophilic solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF) and dibenzylether (DBE) for dehydration and successive clearing...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323659/stimulus-induced-rhythmic-periodic-or-ictal-discharges-in-coma-incidence-and-interrater-reliability-of-continuous-eeg-after-a-standard-stimulation-protocol-a-prospective-study
#6
Khalid A Alsherbini, Joao Mc-OʼNeil Plancher, David M Ficker, Brandon P Foreman, Opeolu M Adeoye, Jun Ying, Michael D Privitera
PURPOSE: Stimulus-induced rhythmic, periodic, or ictal discharges (SIRPIDs) are often seen during continuous electroencephalographic (cEEG) monitoring in coma. Given their uncertain clinical significance, our prospective study evaluated incidence of SIRPIDs in comatose patients in the neuroscience intensive care unit (NSICU) who underwent a standard stimulation protocol and defined interreader reliability for cEEG. METHODS: Of 146 patients prospectively screened who underwent cEEG during a 6-month period, 53 patients were included and 93 patients were excluded...
March 17, 2017: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318531/national-survey-on-postoperative-care-and-treatment-circuits-in-neurosurgery
#7
R Valero, E Carrero, N Fàbregas, F Iturri, N Saiz-Sapena, L Valencia
INTRODUCTION: The analysis of surgical processes should be a standard of health systems. We describe the circuit of care and postoperative treatment for neurosurgical interventions in the centres of our country. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From June to October 2014, a survey dealing with perioperative treatments and postoperative circuits after neurosurgical procedures was sent to the chiefs of Anaesthesiology of 73 Spanish hospitals with neurosurgery and members of the Neuroscience Section of SEDAR...
March 16, 2017: Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28316264/neuroscience-for-the-mental-health-clinician
#8
Simon Fleminger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 20, 2017: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315272/sigma-receptors-and-substance-use-disorders
#9
Valentina Sabino, Callum Hicks, Pietro Cottone
Thanks to advances in neuroscience, addiction is now recognized as a chronic brain disease with genetic, developmental, and cultural components. Drugs of abuse, including alcohol, are able to produce significant neuroplastic changes responsible for the profound disturbances shown by drug addicted individuals. The current lack of efficacious pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders has encouraged the search for novel and more effective pharmacotherapies. Growing evidence strongly suggests that Sigma Receptors are involved in the addictive and neurotoxic properties of abused drugs, including cocaine , methamphetamine , and alcohol...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314462/neuroscience-inspired-behavioral-change-program-for-university-students
#10
REVIEW
James J Hudziak, Gesa L Tiemeier
It is clear that environmental influences impact the structure and function of the human brain, and thus, thoughts, actions, and behaviors. These in turn influence whether an individual engages in high-risk (drugs, alcohol, violence) or health-promoting (exercise, meditation, music) activities. The developmental mismatch between cortical and subcortical maturation of the transitional age brain places college students at risk for negative outcomes. This article argues that the prescription of incentive-based behavioral change and brain-building activities simply make good scientific, programmatic, and financial sense for colleges and universities...
April 2017: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314448/the-transitional-age-brain-the-best-of-times-and-the-worst-of-times
#11
REVIEW
Winston W Chung, James J Hudziak
Over the past two decades, there have been substantial developments in the understanding of brain development and the importance of environmental inputs and context. This paper focuses on the neurodevelopmental mismatch that occurs during the epoch we term the 'transitional age brain' (ages 13-25) and the collateral behavioral correlates. We summarize research findings supporting the argument that, because of this neurodevelopmental mismatch, transitional age youth are at high risk for engaging in behaviors that lead to negative outcomes, morbidity, and mortality...
April 2017: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314446/the-insula-an-underestimated-brain-area-in-clinical-neuroscience-psychiatry-and-neurology
#12
REVIEW
Ho Namkung, Sun-Hong Kim, Akira Sawa
Supported by recent human neuroimaging studies, the insula is re-emerging as an important brain area not only in the physiological understanding of the brain, but also in pathological contexts in clinical research. In this opinion article, we briefly introduce the anatomical and histological features of the human insula. We then summarize the physiological functions of the insula and underscore its pathological roles in psychiatric and neurological disorders that have long been underestimated. We finally propose possible strategies through which the role of the insula may be further understood for both basic and clinical neuroscience...
March 14, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314445/where-does-eeg-come-from-and-what-does-it-mean
#13
REVIEW
Michael X Cohen
Electroencephalography (EEG) has been instrumental in making discoveries about cognition, brain function, and dysfunction. However, where do EEG signals come from and what do they mean? The purpose of this paper is to argue that we know shockingly little about the answer to this question, to highlight what we do know, how important the answers are, and how modern neuroscience technologies that allow us to measure and manipulate neural circuits with high spatiotemporal accuracy might finally bring us some answers...
March 14, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28304255/neurocysticercosis-in-a-rhesus-macaque-macaca-mulatta
#14
Jessica M Johnston, Cecilia D Dyer, Susan Madison-Antenucci, Kimberly Am Mergen, Christin L Veeder, Angela K Brice
An 8-y-old, intact, male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was sedated to undergo MRI in preparation for the implantation of cranial hardware. During imaging, 9 focal lesions were noted in the brain and musculature of the head. The lesions were hyperechoic with hypoechoic rims. The animal was deemed inappropriate for neuroscience research, and euthanasia was elected. Gross examination revealed multiple round, thick-walled, fluid-filled cysts (diameter, approximately 0.5 cm) in multiple tissues: one each in the left caudal lung lobe, left masseter muscle, and the dura overlying the brain and 8 throughout the gray and white matter of the brain parenchyma...
December 1, 2016: Comparative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303577/some-do-not-like-it-hot
#15
Matthew C Kiernan
Across the clinical neurosciences, it may be argued that the greatest physiological contributions have been derived in the realm of demyelinating disease This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
March 16, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303479/testing-the-generality-of-the-zoom-lens-model-evidence-for-visual-pathway-specific-effects-of-attended-region-size-on-perception
#16
Stephanie C Goodhew, Rebecca K Lawrence, Mark Edwards
There are volumes of information available to process in visual scenes. Visual spatial attention is a critically important selection mechanism that prevents these volumes from overwhelming our visual system's limited-capacity processing resources. We were interested in understanding the effect of the size of the attended area on visual perception. The prevailing model of attended-region size across cognition, perception, and neuroscience is the zoom-lens model. This model stipulates that the magnitude of perceptual processing enhancement is inversely related to the size of the attended region, such that a narrow attended-region facilitates greater perceptual enhancement than a wider region...
March 16, 2017: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303019/integration-of-optogenetics-with-complementary-methodologies-in-systems-neuroscience
#17
REVIEW
Christina K Kim, Avishek Adhikari, Karl Deisseroth
Modern optogenetics can be tuned to evoke activity that corresponds to naturally occurring local or global activity in timing, magnitude or individual-cell patterning. This outcome has been facilitated not only by the development of core features of optogenetics over the past 10 years (microbial-opsin variants, opsin-targeting strategies and light-targeting devices) but also by the recent integration of optogenetics with complementary technologies, spanning electrophysiology, activity imaging and anatomical methods for structural and molecular analysis...
March 17, 2017: Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302564/tackling-maladaptive-memories-through-reconsolidation-from-neural-to-clinical-science
#18
James W B Elsey, Merel Kindt
Behavioral neuroscience has greatly informed how we understand the formation, persistence, and plasticity of memory. Research has demonstrated that memory reactivation can induce a labile period, during which previously consolidated memories are sensitive to change, and in need of restabilization. This process is known as reconsolidation. Such findings have advanced not only our basic understanding of memory processes, but also hint at the prospect of harnessing these insights for the development of a new generation of treatments for disorders of emotional memory...
March 13, 2017: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301776/neurotransmitter-switching-in-the-developing-and-adult-brain
#19
Nicholas C Spitzer
Neurotransmitter switching is the gain of one neurotransmitter and the loss of another in the same neuron in response to chronic stimulation. Neurotransmitter receptors on postsynaptic cells change to match the identity of the newly expressed neurotransmitter. Neurotransmitter switching often appears to change the sign of the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or from inhibitory to excitatory. In these cases, neurotransmitter switching and receptor matching thus change the polarity of the circuit in which they take place...
March 6, 2017: Annual Review of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301775/the-microbiome-and-host-behavior
#20
Helen E Vuong, Jessica M Yano, Thomas C Fung, Elaine Y Hsiao
The microbiota is increasingly recognized for its ability to influence the development and function of the nervous system and several complex host behaviors. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for the gut microbiota in modulating host social and communicative behavior, stressor-induced behavior, and performance in learning and memory tasks. We summarize effects of the microbiota on host neurophysiology, including brain microstructure, gene expression, and neurochemical metabolism across regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and hypothalamus...
March 8, 2017: Annual Review of Neuroscience
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