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"emergency medicine"

Ganbold Lundeg, Amanda Baric, David C Pescod, Keith Pescod
Anesthesia in Mongolia has undergone a period of major development over the past 17 years, thanks to the work of the Mongolian Society of Anesthesiologists (MSA) and the support of the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists and the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. The specialty has made major advances in training and in its standing among medical specialties in Mongolia. The MSA has produced members who are leaders in the development of anesthesia as well as emergency medicine and critical care...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Brittany Ellis, Christopher R Carpenter, Judy A Lowthian, Simon P Mooijaart, Christian H Nickel, Don Melady
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 16, 2018: CJEM
Jean Louis Trouillet, Olivier Collange, Fouad Belafia, François Blot, Gilles Capellier, Eric Cesareo, Jean-Michel Constantin, Alexandre Demoule, Jean-Luc Diehl, Pierre-Grégoire Guinot, Franck Jegoux, Erwan L'Her, Charles-Edouard Luyt, Yazine Mahjoub, Julien Mayaux, Hervé Quintard, François Ravat, Sebastien Vergez, Julien Amour, Max Guillot
Tracheotomy is widely used in intensive care units, albeit with great disparities between medical teams in terms of frequency and modality. Indications and techniques are, however, associated with variable levels of evidence based on inhomogeneous or even contradictory literature. Our aim was to conduct a systematic analysis of the published data in order to provide guidelines. We present herein recommendations for the use of tracheotomy in adult critically ill patients developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) method...
March 15, 2018: Annals of Intensive Care
Christopher Sampson, Marc Borenstein
Background The impact of resident work hours on resident well-being and patient safety has long been a controversial issue. Objectives What has not been considered in resident work hour limitations is whether resident commuting time has any impact on a resident's total work hours or well-being. Methods A self-administered electronic survey was distributed to emergency medicine residents in 2016. Results The survey response was 8% (569/6828). Commuter time was 30 minutes or less in 70%. Two residents reported a commuter time of 76 to 90 minutes and one resident had a commuter time of 91 to 105 minutes...
January 12, 2018: Curēus
Grace Frances Mary McKay, Asoka Weerasinghe
BACKGROUND: Ultrasonography is recognised as an invaluable imaging modality for assessing critically unwell patients and obtaining vascular access. Senior emergency medicine and anaesthetic clinicians will regularly use ultrasound-guided imaging to establish vascular access for unwell patients; however, junior doctors, who are routinely the first clinicians to review deteriorating patients, are not encouraged or required to develop basic ultrasound interventional skills and are therefore ill equipped to use ultrasonography...
March 15, 2018: Postgraduate Medical Journal
Sarah Edgerley, Conor McKaigney, Devon Boyne, Darrell Ginsberg, Jeffrey Damon Dagnone, Andrew Koch Hall
AIM: Emergency medicine (EM) trainees often work nightshifts. We sought to measure how this circadian disruption affects EM resident performance during simulated resuscitations. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study enrolled EM residents at a single Canadian academic centre over a six-year period. Residents completed twice-annual simulation-based resuscitation-focused objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) with assessment in four domains (primary assessment, diagnostic actions, therapeutic actions and communication), and a global assessment score (GAS)...
March 12, 2018: Resuscitation
William J Meurer, Bradley Barth, Michael Abraham, Jerome Hoffman, Gary M Vilke, Gerard DeMers
BACKGROUND: Stroke treatment is a continuum that begins with the rapid identification of symptoms and treatment with transition to successful rehabilitation. Therapies for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) may vary based on anatomic location, interval from symptom onset, and coexisting health conditions. Successful therapy requires a seamless systematic approach with coordination from prehospital environment through acute management at medical facilities to disposition and long-term care of the patient...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Paul I Musey, John A Lee, Cassandra A Hall, Jeffrey A Kline
BACKGROUND: Approximately 80% of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) with chest pain do not have any true cardiopulmonary emergency such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, psychological contributors such as anxiety are thought to be present in up to 58%, but often remain undiagnosed leading to chronic chest pain and ED recidivism. METHODS: To evaluate ED provider beliefs and their usual practices regarding the approach and disposition of patients with low risk chest pain associated with anxiety, we constructed a 22-item survey using a modified Delphi technique...
March 14, 2018: BMC Emergency Medicine
Shiva Kalidindi, Thomas A Lacy
Emergencies do occur in pediatric primary care offices. The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Pediatric Emergency Medicine recommends that primary care offices perform a self-assessment of office readiness for emergencies. Primary care offices should develop an emergency response plan to recognize, stabilize, and transfer sick children. They should also ensure their offices have the essential equipment, supplies, and medications readily available in case of emergencies. Primary care offices can prepare and practice for office emergencies through "mock codes" and by maintaining certification in basic and advanced life support courses...
March 1, 2018: Pediatric Annals
Jennifer Setlik
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2018: Pediatric Annals
Vanessa A Thomas, Heather L Crouse, Kristy O Murray, Deborah C Hsu, Elizabeth A Camp, Andrea T Cruz
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to perform a needs assessment of pediatric (PEM) and general emergency medicine (EM) provider knowledge, comfort, and current practice patterns in the evaluation of pediatric tropical infectious diseases. METHODS: An online survey was developed based on educational priorities identified by an expert panel via modified Delphi methodology. The survey included assessment of providers' typical evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of tropical diseases and was distributed to PEM and EM providers in 2 large professional organizations...
March 12, 2018: Pediatric Emergency Care
Mackensie A Yore, Matthew C Strehlow, Lily D Yan, Elizabeth A Pirrotta, Joan L Woods, Koy Somontha, Yim Sovannra, Lauren Auerbach, Rebecca Backer, Christophe Grundmann, Swaminatha V Mahadevan
BACKGROUND: Emergency medicine is a young specialty in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although many patients seeking emergency or acute care are children, little information is available about the needs and current treatment of this group in LMICs. In this observational study, we sought to describe characteristics, chief complaints, management, and outcomes of children presenting for unscheduled visits to two Cambodian public hospitals. METHODS: Children enrolled in the study presented without appointment for treatment at one of two Cambodian public referral hospitals during a 4-week period in 2012...
March 13, 2018: International Journal of Emergency Medicine
Ahmad Khobrani, Nirali H Patel, Richard L George, Neil L McNinch, Rami A Ahmed
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children worldwide. Trauma education is one of the most commonly reported deficiencies in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) training. In this study, we describe the creation of a pediatric trauma boot camp in which trainees' basic knowledge, level of confidence, teamwork, and communication skills are assessed. The primary goal of this pilot study was to create a simulation-based pediatric trauma curriculum for PEM fellows and emergency medicine residents utilizing Kern's curricular conceptual framework...
2018: Emergency Medicine International
Rob Woods, Teresa Chan, Brent Thoma, Jonathan Sherbino
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: CJEM
Michèle Twomey, Ana Šijački, Gert Krummrey, Tyson Welzel, Aristomenis K Exadaktylos, Marko Ercegovac
Emergency center visits are mostly unscheduled, undifferentiated, and unpredictable. A standardized triage process is an opportunity to obtain real-time data that paints a picture of the variation in acuity found in emergency centers. This is particularly pertinent as the influx of people seeking asylum or in transit mostly present with emergency care needs or first seek help at an emergency center. Triage not only reduces the risk of missing or losing a patient that may be deteriorating in the waiting room but also enables a time-critical response in the emergency care service provision...
March 12, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Elliot M Ross, Theodore T Redman
BACKGROUND: Noncompressible junctional and truncal hemorrhage remains a significant cause of combat casualty death. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is an effective treatment for many junctional and noncompressible hemorrhages. The current hospital standard for time of placement of REBOA is approximately 6 minutes. This study examined the training process and the ability of nonsurgical physicians to apply REBOA therapy in an austere field environment. METHODS: This was a skill acquisition and feasibility study...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Riyad B Abu-Laban, Sharla Drebit, Ronald R Lindstrom, Chantel Archibald, Kim Eggers, Kendall Ho, Afshin Khazei, Adam Lund, Carolyn MacKinnon, Ray Markham, Julian Marsden, Ed Martin, Jim Christenson
As generalists, emergency practitioners face challenges in providing state-of-the-art care owing to the broad spectrum of practice and the rapid rate of new knowledge generation. Networks have become increasingly prevalent in health care, and it was in this backdrop, and the resulting opportunity to advance evidence-informed emergency care in the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC), that a new "Emergency Medicine Network" (EM Network) was launched in 2017. The EM Network consists of four programs, each led by a physician with expertise and a track record in the domain: (1) Clinical Resources; (2) Innovation; (3) Continuing Professional Development; and (4) Real-time Support...
January 4, 2018: Curēus
Antonia Quinn, Teresa M Chan, Christopher Sampson, Catherine Grossman, Christine Butts, John Casey, Holly Caretta-Weyer, Michael Gottlieb
Traditionally, scholarship that was recognized for promotion and tenure consisted of clinical research, bench research, and grant funding. Recent trends have allowed for differing approaches to scholarship, including digital publication. As increasing numbers of trainees and faculty turn to online educational resources, it is imperative to critically evaluate these resources. This article summarizes five key papers that address the appraisal of digital scholarship and describes their relevance to junior clinician educators and faculty developers...
January 3, 2018: Curēus
William Bortcosh, Ashkon Shaahinfar, Sakina Sojar, Jean E Klig
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The diagnostic capability, efficiency and versatility of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) have enabled its use in paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) and paediatric critical care (PICU). This review highlights the current applications of POCUS for the critically ill child across PEM and PICU to identify areas of progress and standardized practice and to elucidate areas for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: POCUS technology continues to evolve and advance bedside clinical care for critically ill children, with ongoing research extending its use for an array of clinical scenarios, including respiratory distress, trauma and dehydration...
March 9, 2018: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Muhammad Irfan Farooque
Training in Emergency medicine for nearly 5 years, I thought the finish line was getting near and becoming a consultant was just down the corner. I was enjoying work, getting better every day and well appreciated by peers. But little did I know that life had other plans. I ended up in an emergency department presenting with status epilepticus preceded by vague ongoing symptoms lasting for 2 months. I was intubated and transferred to Intensive care and did not receive a formal diagnosis which still remains a mystery...
March 10, 2018: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
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