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Asymptomatic carriage

Valentina Talarico, Monica Aloe, Alice Monzani, Roberto Miniero, Gianni Bona
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy defined by thrombocytopenia, non-immune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure. HUS is typically classified into two primary types: 1) HUS due to infections, often associated with diarrhea (D+HUS, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia Coli-HUS), with the rare exception of HUS due to a severe disseminated infection caused by Streptococcus; 2) HUS related to complement, such HUS is also known as "atypical HUS" and is not diarrhea associated (D-HUS, aHUS); but recent studies have shown other forms of HUS, that can occur in the course of systemic diseases or physiopathological conditions such as pregnancy, after transplantation or after drug assumption...
December 2016: Minerva Pediatrica
Vivian G Loo, Paul Brassard, Mark A Miller
OBJECTIVE To determine the risk of Clostridium difficile transmission from index cases with C. difficile infection (CDI) to their household contacts and domestic pets. DESIGN A prospective study from April 2011 to June 2013. SETTING Patients with CDI from Canadian tertiary care centers. PARTICIPANTS Patients with CDI, their household human contacts, and pets. METHODS Epidemiologic information and stool or rectal swabs were collected from participants at enrollment and monthly for up to 4 months. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on C...
November 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Robert J Gianotti, Alan C Moss
Clostridium difficile (CD) is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacillus that is responsible for a spectrum of gastrointestinal illness ranging from asymptomatic carriage to toxic megacolon and death. The prevalence of CD infection is increasing in both hospitalized and community-based inflammatory bowel disease populations. Standard antibiotic therapy fails to cure or prevent recurrence in more than 50% of patients, thus increasing the need for alternative therapies. Recently, fecal microbiota transplantation has received renewed attention as a therapy for refractory or recurrent CD infection...
November 2016: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Jeremy Woodward, Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas, Dinakantha Kumararatne
Chronic infection with Norovirus is emerging as a significant risk for patients with immunodeficiency - either primary or secondary to therapeutic immunosuppression. Patients with primary immunodeficiency present a range of pathological responses to Norovirus infection. Asymptomatic infections occur and differentiating viral carriage or prolonged viral shedding after self-limiting infection from infection causing protracted diarrhoea can be challenging due to relatively mild pathological changes that may mimic other causes of diarrhoea in such patients (for instance pathogenic bacteria or parasites or graft-versus-host disease)...
October 18, 2016: Clinical and Experimental Immunology
Tejaswini Kulkarni, Chihiro Aikawa, Takashi Nozawa, Kazunori Murase, Fumito Maruyama, Ichiro Nakagawa
BACKGROUND: Group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) causes a range of mild to severe infections in humans. It can also colonize healthy persons asymptomatically. Therefore, it is important to study GAS carriage in healthy populations, as carriage of it might lead to subsequent disease manifestation, clonal spread in the community, and/or diversification of the organism. Throat swab culture is the gold standard method for GAS detection. Advanced culture-independent methods provide rapid and efficient detection of microorganisms directly from clinical samples...
October 11, 2016: BMC Microbiology
Iryna Janssen, Paul Cooper, Katrin Gunka, Maja Rupnik, Daniela Wetzel, Ortrud Zimmermann, Uwe Groß
Since data about Clostridium difficile infection in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce, we determined its epidemiology and risk factors in a cross-sectional study in Eikwe, a rural community in Ghana. We tested stool samples from 176 hospitalized patients with diarrhoea and from 131 asymptomatic non-hospitalized individuals for C. difficile and some other enteric pathogens. The overall prevalence rate of C. difficile was 4.9% with ribotype 084 being predominant. With 75% of the isolates, a high rate of nontoxigenic strains was present in symptomatic patients, most of whom had no other identified enteric pathogens...
September 24, 2016: International Journal of Medical Microbiology: IJMM
Thato Motshoge, Grace K Ababio, Larysa Aleksenko, John Read, Elias Peloewetse, Mazhani Loeto, Tjantilili Mosweunyane, Kentse Moakofhi, Davies S Ntebele, Simon Chihanga, Mpho Motlaleng, Anderson Chinorumba, Moses Vurayai, Jeffrey M Pernica, Giacomo M Paganotti, Isaac K Quaye
BACKGROUND: Botswana is one of eight SADC countries targeting malaria elimination by 2018. Through spirited upscaling of control activities and passive surveillance, significant reductions in case incidence of Plasmodium falciparum (0.96 - 0.01) was achieved between 2008 and 2012. As part of the elimination campaign, active detection of asymptomatic Plasmodium species by a highly sensitive method was deemed necessary. This study was carried out to determine asymptomatic Plasmodium species carriage by nested PCR in the country, in 2012...
September 29, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
P J Wu, D Jeyaratnam, O Tosas, B S Cooper, G L French
BACKGROUND: Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is frequently endemic in healthcare settings and may be transmitted by person-to-person spread. Asymptomatic MRSA carriers are potential, unsuspected sources for transmission and some of them may be identified by admission screening. AIM: To assess whether rapid point-of-care screening (POCS) for MRSA at hospital admission may be associated with a reduction in MRSA acquisition rates when compared with slower laboratory-based methods...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Hospital Infection
Shawn M D Bearson, Bradley L Bearson, Crystal L Loving, Heather K Allen, InSoo Lee, Darin Madson, Marcus E Kehrli
Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health and public health as a food safety risk. Various obstacles impede the effort to reduce asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, including the existence of numerous serovars and the ubiquitous nature of Salmonella. To develop an intervention strategy that is non-specific yet effective against diverse Salmonella serovars, we explored the prophylactic use of a cytokine to decrease Salmonella in swine by boosting the host's innate immune system...
2016: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
M Harries, J Dreesman, S Rettenbacher-Riefler, E Mertens
Children may be at higher risk for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria because of higher usage of antimicrobials. They also have higher rates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections than other population groups. Some infections, particularly in children, are asymptomatic, but still lead to the excretion of large numbers of bacteria and viruses that may cause clinical disease in other individuals. That is one reason why, in Lower Saxony as in other German federal states - asymptomatic carriers of STEC are excluded from nurseries and schools until three consecutive stool samples test negative in order to prevent secondary cases...
September 9, 2016: Epidemiology and Infection
Ana Madueño, Jonathan González García, Maria José Ramos, Yanet Pedroso, Zaida Díaz, Jesus Oteo, María Lecuona
Asymptomatic colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae is an important reservoir for transmission that may precede infection. This prospective, observational, case-control study was designed to identify risk factors for carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPKP) fecal carriage. This study included 87 cases and 200 controls. Multivariate analysis identified length of stay (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.03; P = .03), previous hospitalization (OR, 5...
September 2, 2016: American Journal of Infection Control
Jaishree Raman, Natashia Morris, John Frean, Basil Brooke, Lucille Blumberg, Philip Kruger, Aaron Mabusa, Eric Raswiswi, Bridget Shandukani, Eunice Misani, Mary-Anne Groepe, Devanand Moonasar
BACKGROUND: With a sustained national malaria incidence of fewer than one case per 1000 population at risk, in 2012 South Africa officially transitioned from controlling malaria to the ambitious goal of eliminating malaria within its borders by 2018. This review assesses the progress made in the 3 years since programme re-orientation while highlighting challenges and suggesting priorities for moving the malaria programme towards elimination. METHODS: National malaria case data and annual spray coverage data from 2010 until 2014 were assessed for trends...
2016: Malaria Journal
Karikalacholan Sivasankari, Santhanam Shanmughapriya, Kalimuthusamy Natarajaseenivasan
Humans are known to excrete leptospires in their urine after recovery from illness and there are reports showing development of asymptomatic leptospiruria in settings of high disease transmission. In this regard, we sought to evaluate the asymptomatic renal carriage status of humans in the highly endemic region of Tiruchirapalli district, Tamilnadu, India. A total of 245 asymptomatic participants were included. Urine and blood samples were collected and the extent of leptospiral infection was characterized by MAT, qPCR, 16S rRNA, and dot blot assay...
June 2016: Pathogens and Global Health
Márta Patyi, Zsuzsanna Tóth, Edit Kelemen, Gyula Tálosi
INTRODUCTION: The extended beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae may cause asymptomatic carriage if present in the colon of premature infants or pregnant women. AIM: To assess the incidence of colonization among mothers whose infants were admitted to Neonatal Intensive Center on the day of their delivery for this pathogen. METHOD: From October 1, 2013 until October 31, 2015 the authors screened mothers on the day of their delivery for this pathogen...
August 2016: Orvosi Hetilap
Rachana Babu, Anil Kumar, Shamsul Karim, Sruthi Warrier, Suresh G Nair, Sanjeev K Singh, Raja Biswas
The prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) in hospitalised and community patients is of significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to estimate the faecal carriage rate of ESBL-PE in hospitalised patients and healthy asymptomatic individuals coming for health check-up. Non-repetitive, consecutive stool samples from 480 adults (260 healthy individuals and 220 hospitalised patients) aged ≥18 years from November 2011 to July 2013 were screened using MacConkey agar supplemented with ceftazidime...
September 2016: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance
J Kaarme, R A Hickman, T Nevéus, J Blomberg, C Öhrmalm
OBJECTIVES: Infectious gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases among children and has a considerable impact on health and socio-economy. Day care centres are high-risk environments for infections. The aim of this study was to investigate if asymptomatic preschool children constitute a reservoir for potential enteropathogens. STUDY DESIGN: In total, 438 individual diapers were collected from day care centres in Uppsala, Sweden, during spring and autumn, and molecular techniques were used to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic carriage of multiple enteropathogens...
August 12, 2016: Public Health
Benedikt Hogan, Raphael Rakotozandrindrainy, Hassan Al-Emran, Denise Dekker, Andreas Hahn, Anna Jaeger, Sven Poppert, Hagen Frickmann, Ralf Matthias Hagen, Volker Micheel, Sabine Crusius, Jean Noel Heriniaina, Jean Philibert Rakotondrainiarivelo, Tsiriniaina Razafindrabe, Jürgen May, Norbert Georg Schwarz
BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones pose a significant threat to hospitalised patients because the bacteria can be transmitted by asymptomatic carriers within healthcare facilities. To date, nothing is known about the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA among healthcare workers in Madagascar. The objective of our study was to examine the prevalence and clonal epidemiology of nasal S. aureus and MRSA among healthcare workers and non-medical University students in Antananarivo, Madagascar...
2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Jean-François Jusot, Daniel R Neill, Elaine M Waters, Mathieu Bangert, Marisol Collins, Laura Bricio Moreno, Katiellou G Lawan, Mouhaiminou Moussa Moussa, Emma Dearing, Dean B Everett, Jean-Marc Collard, Aras Kadioglu
BACKGROUND: The Sahel region of West Africa has the highest bacterial meningitis attack and case fatality rate in the world. The effect of climatic factors on patterns of invasive respiratory bacterial disease is not well documented. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the link between climatic factors and occurrence of invasive respiratory bacterial disease in a Sahel region of Niger. METHODS: We conducted daily disease surveillance and climatic monitoring over an 8-year period between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2010, in Niamey, Niger, to determine risk factors for bacterial meningitis and invasive bacterial disease...
July 14, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Faustina Helena Burdam, Mohammad Hakimi, Franciscus Thio, Enny Kenangalem, Ratni Indrawanti, Rintis Noviyanti, Leily Trianty, Jutta Marfurt, Irene Handayuni, Yati Soenarto, Nicholas M Douglas, Nicholas M Anstey, Ric N Price, Jeanne Rini Poespoprodjo
BACKGROUND: Anaemia in children under five years old is associated with poor health, growth and developmental outcomes. In Papua, Indonesia, where the burden of anaemia in infants is high, we conducted a community survey to assess the association between Plasmodium infection, helminth carriage and the risk of anaemia. METHODS: A cross sectional household survey was carried out between April and July 2013 in 16 villages in the District of Mimika using a multistage sampling procedure...
2016: PloS One
Yicheng Xie, Jeffrey W Savell, Ashley N Arnold, Kerri B Gehring, Jason J Gill, T Matthew Taylor
Asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in beef cattle is a food safety concern, and the beef feedlot environment may function as a reservoir of this pathogen. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate Salmonella and Salmonella bacteriophages from beef cattle feedlot environments in order to better understand the microbial ecology of Salmonella and identify phages that might be useful as anti-Salmonella beef safety interventions. Three feedlots in south Texas were visited, and 27 distinct samples from each source were collected from dropped feces, feed from feed bunks, drinking water from troughs, and soil in cattle pens (n = 108 samples)...
August 2016: Journal of Food Protection
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