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Nese Karadag, Kerem Tolan, Emine Samdanci, Ayse Selimoglu, Nusret Akpolat, Sezai Yilmaz
OBJECTIVES: Wilson disease is a rare genetic disease with clinical and histopathologic differential diagnostic challenges. In this study, we evaluated the histopathologic findings of explanted livers in Wilson disease, with special emphasis on copper histochemistry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study group was recruited by reviewing archived histopathology reports and the liver transplant clinic patient records retrospectively for patients who had liver transplant for Wilson disease between January 2010 and June 2015, at Turgut Ozal Medical Center...
October 14, 2016: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation
Shi-Fa Zhang, Yan Zhou, Kai-Jing Zhang, Jia-Jie Luan, Shi-Mei Qi
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) silencing with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) on brain injury repair in preterm rats with brain injury caused by intrauterine infection and related mechanism of action. METHODS: The pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (with a gestational age of 15 days) were selected, and premature delivery was induced by RU486 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preterm rats delivered by those treated with RU486 were selected as the control group...
October 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
Kritima Kapoor, Opinder Singh
AIM: This study was designed to elucidate the histoenzymic distribution of enzymes, i.e., phosphatases, oxidoreductases, dehydrogenases, and diaphorases in cecal lymphoid tissue during its development in the prenatal period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted on cecum of 15 buffalo fetuses ranging from 16 cm curved crown-rump length (CVRL) (100 days) to 100 cm CVRL (full term). The fetuses were categorized into three groups based on their CVRL. RESULTS: In Group I, the distribution of enzymes was uniformly weak in developing villi-like projections in cecum and completely absent from submucosa...
September 2016: Veterinary World
Suchismita Daw, Ritam Chatterjee, Aditya Law, Sujata Law
Hematological disorders like myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) may arise due to cumulative dysregulation of various signalling pathways controlling proliferation, differentiation, maturation and apoptosis of bone marrow cells. This devastating bone marrow condition can be due to consequential abnormalities in haematopoiesis as well as its supportive microenvironment. Although mutations related to JAK/STAT pathway are common in myeloproliferative neoplasms, further studies are required to fully explore the myelodysplastic scenario regarding the concerned pathway...
October 7, 2016: Chemico-biological Interactions
Taneeru Sravya, Guttikonda Venkateswara Rao, Manchikatla Praveen Kumar, K Sudheerkanth
Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the head and neck (H and N) is an aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). They are described as SCC subtype with high infiltrative capacity and also presents with dual histomorphology, having both squamous and glandular cell components. ASC of the H and N region is considered as a controversial tumor, as it is similar to salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinoma. It has been described in a variety of body sites, including uterine cervix, lung and pancreas. ASC rarely develops in the upper aerodigestive tract, particularly in the oral cavity...
September 2016: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: JOMFP
Mark John Hackett, Phyllis G Paterson, Ingrid J Pickering, Graham N George
A method to image taurine distributions within the central nervous system and other organs has long been sought. Since taurine is small and mobile, it cannot be chemically "tagged" and imaged using conventional immuno-histochemistry methods. Combining numerous indirect measurements, taurine is known to play critical roles in brain function during health and disease, and is proposed to act as a neuro-osmolyte, neuro-modulator and possibly a neuro-transmitter. Elucidation of taurine's neurochemical roles and importance would be substantially enhanced by a direct method to visualize alterations, due to physiological and pathological events in the brain, in the local concentration of taurine at or near cellular spatial resolution in vivo, or in situ in tissue sections...
October 4, 2016: Analytical Chemistry
Jingwen Xu, Mengting Han, Jiwei Shen, Qi Guan, Zhaoshi Bai, Binyue Lang, Huijuan Zhang, Zengqiang Li, Daiying Zuo, Weige Zhang, Yingliang Wu
2-Methoxy-5((3,4,5-trimethosyphenyl)seleninyl) phenol (SQ) is a novel synthesized combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) analog that can be classified as a microtubule inhibitor. Our previous study demonstrated that SQ induced G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we found that SQ dissociated the MDM2-p53 complex and directly induced MDM2 degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Further, p53 was activated by SQ through regulation of its transcription, translation, and post-translation modification...
September 28, 2016: Cancer Letters
Dimitrinka Y Atanasova, Nikolay D Dimitrov, Nikolai E Lazarov
The carotid body (CB) is a major peripheral arterial chemoreceptor organ that evokes compensatory reflex responses so as to maintain gas homeostasis. It is dually innervated by sensory fibers from petrosal ganglion (PG) neurons, and autonomic fibers from postganglionic sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and parasympathetic vasomotor fibers of intrinsic ganglion cells in the CB. The presence of nitric oxide (NO), a putative gaseous neurotransmitter substance in a number of neuronal and non-neuronal structures, was examined in the CB, PG and SCG of the rat using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunohistochemistry and retrograde tracing...
September 28, 2016: Acta Histochemica
Mark John Hackett, Nicole J Sylvain, Huishu Hou, Sally Caine, Mariam Alaverdashvili, Michael Jake Pushie, Michael E Kelly
Imaging energy metabolites as markers of the energy shuttle between glia and neurons following ischemia is an ongoing challenge. Traditional microscopies in combination with histochemistry reveal glycogen accumulation within glia following ischemia, indicating an altered metabolic profile. Although semi-quantitative histochemical glycogen analysis is possible, the method suffers from typical confounding factors common to histochemistry, such as variation in reagent penetration and binding. In addition, histochemical detection of glycogen does not reveal information on the metabolic fate of glycogen (i...
October 3, 2016: Analytical Chemistry
Zaki Hakami, Satoshi Wakisaka
The development of submucosal glands of rat nasopharynx was studied with respect to their morphological maturation and glycoprotein alterations during the postnatal period. This study examined the histological morphology with hematoxylin-eosin and the binding pattern of lectins, soybean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (sucWGA) on frozen sections from newborn into adulthood...
September 23, 2016: Acta Histochemica
Maayan Baron, Adrian Veres, Samuel L Wolock, Aubrey L Faust, Renaud Gaujoux, Amedeo Vetere, Jennifer Hyoje Ryu, Bridget K Wagner, Shai S Shen-Orr, Allon M Klein, Douglas A Melton, Itai Yanai
Although the function of the mammalian pancreas hinges on complex interactions of distinct cell types, gene expression profiles have primarily been described with bulk mixtures. Here we implemented a droplet-based, single-cell RNA-seq method to determine the transcriptomes of over 12,000 individual pancreatic cells from four human donors and two mouse strains. Cells could be divided into 15 clusters that matched previously characterized cell types: all endocrine cell types, including rare epsilon-cells; exocrine cell types; vascular cells; Schwann cells; quiescent and activated stellate cells; and four types of immune cells...
September 21, 2016: Cell Systems
Hiromi Hongo, Muneteru Sasaki, Sachio Kobayashi, Tomoka Hasegawa, Tomomaya Yamamoto, Kanako Tsuboi, Erika Tsuchiya, Tomoya Nagai, Naznin Khadiza, Miki Abe, Ai Kudo, Kimimitsu Oda, Paulo Henrique Luiz de Freitas, Minqi Li, Hisayoshi Yurimoto, Norio Amizuka
Minodronate is highlighted for its marked and sustained effects on osteoporotic bones. To determine the duration of minodronate's effects, we have assessed the localization of the drug in mouse bones through isotope microscopy, after labeling it with a stable nitrogen isotope ([(15)N]-minodronate). In addition, minodronate-treated bones were assessed by histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eight-week-old male ICR mice received [(15)N]-minodronate (1 mg/kg) intravenously and were sacrificed after 3 hr, 24 hr, 1 week, and 1 month...
October 2016: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry: Official Journal of the Histochemistry Society
Moacyr J B M Rêgo, Antônio F Silva Filho, Ana P V Sobral, Eduardo I C Beltrão
The formation of new and functional structural components of several organs, such as parotid glands, can be influenced by the glycocode. This study analyzed the glycobiology of parotid salivary gland tissue during fetal development using specific biochemical probes (lectins and antibodies). Eleven parotid gland samples from human fetuses were obtained from spontaneous abortions at 14-28 weeks of gestation, and tissue sections were analyzed for lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. From the 18th to 26th week, Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I, peanut agglutinin, Sambucus nigra agglutinin, and Vicia villosa agglutinin lectin staining were predominantly observed in the apical and/or basement membranes of the ducts and tubulo-acinar units...
2016: Journal of Oral Science
Lei Zheng, Xiaojiang Ding, Kaiyun Liu, Shibin Feng, Bo Tang, Qianwei Li, Dingde Huang, Shiming Yang
Fibrosis, closely related to chronic various diseases, is a pathological process characterised by the accumulation of collagen (largely collagen type I). Non-invasive methods are necessary for the diagnosis and follow-up of fibrosis. This study aimed to develop a collagen-targeted probe for the molecular imaging of fibrosis. We identified CPKESCNLFVLKD (CBP1495) as an original collagen-binding peptide using isothermal titration calorimetry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CBP1495 effectively bound to collagen type I (K d = 861 nM) and (GPO)9 (K d = 633 nM), a collagen mimetic peptide...
September 16, 2016: Amino Acids
Agnes Rosarina Prita Sari, Nicholas Wolfgang Rufaut, Leslie Norman Jones, Rodney Daniel Sinclair
CONTEXT: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number...
July 2016: International Journal of Trichology
Meng Xianyu, Bi Zhenggang, Lu Laijin
The aim of the study was to critically review the clinical approach to distinguish the sensory and motor nerve fascicles of the peripheral nerve system and to explore potential novel techniques to meet the clinical needs. The principles and shortcomings of the currently used methods for identification of sensory and motor nerve fascicles, including nerve morphology, electrical stimulation, spectroscopy, enzymohistochemistry staining (acetylcholinesterase [AchE], carbonic anhydrase [CA] and choline acetyltransferase [ChAC] histochemistry staining methods), and immunochemical staining were systematically reviewed...
September 2016: Neurology India
Christina Leyson, Monique França, Mark Jackwood, Brian Jordan
Sequencing avian infectious bronchitis virus spike genes re-isolated from vaccinated chicks revealed that many sequence changes are found on the S1 spike gene. In the ArkDPI strain, Y43H and ∆344 are the two most common changes observed. This study aims to examine the roles of Y43H and ∆344 in selection in vivo. Using recombinant ArkDPI S1 proteins, we conducted binding assays on chicken tracheas and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Protein histochemistry showed that the Y43H change allows for enhanced binding to trachea, whereas the ArkDPI S1 spike with H43 alone was able to bind CAM...
November 2016: Virology
Diana Olivo, Mario Caba, Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, Juan F Rodríguez-Landa, Aleph A Corona-Morales
When food is restricted to a brief fixed period every day, animals show an increase in temperature, corticosterone concentration and locomotor activity for 2-3h before feeding time, termed food anticipatory activity. Mechanisms and neuroanatomical circuits responsible for food anticipatory activity remain unclear, and may involve both oscillators and networks related to temporal conditioning. Rabbit pups are nursed once-a-day so they represent a natural model of circadian food anticipatory activity. Food anticipatory behavior in pups may be associated with neural circuits that temporally anticipate feeding, while the nursing event may produce consummatory effects...
January 1, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
Amy E Vincent, John P Grady, Mariana C Rocha, Charlotte L Alston, Karolina A Rygiel, Rita Barresi, Robert W Taylor, Doug M Turnbull
Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are characterised by focal myofibrillar destruction and accumulation of myofibrillar elements as protein aggregates. They are caused by mutations in the DES, MYOT, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6 and ZASP genes as well as other as yet unidentified genes. Previous studies have reported changes in mitochondrial morphology and cellular positioning, as well as clonally-expanded, large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and focal respiratory chain deficiency in muscle of MFM patients...
October 2016: Neuromuscular Disorders: NMD
Ron A Meyers, Joshua C McFarland
Slow fibers are typically characterized as functioning in avian postural behaviors such as soaring flight, and are described for a number of elite soarers such as vultures, pelicans and albatrosses. Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles also display soaring behavior and we examined their flight muscles for the presence of slow fibers. Surprisingly, eagles lack a deep layer to the pectoralis found in other soaring species. Additionally, the pectoralis as well as other shoulder muscles had few to no slow muscle fibers...
July 2016: Acta Zoologica
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