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Skeletal muscle damage

Aaron J Done, Tinna Traustadóttir
The primary aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the effects of acute exercise and regular exercise on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activity and downstream targets of Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 (encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene) is the master regulator of antioxidant defenses, a transcription factor that regulates expression of more than 200 cytoprotective genes. Increasing evidence indicates that Nrf2 signaling plays a key role in how oxidative stress mediates the beneficial effects of exercise...
October 14, 2016: Redox Biology
Hikari Takeshita, Masao Takeda, Koichi Yamamoto, Hiromi Rakugi
OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin converting enzyme2 (ACE2), an enzyme that produces the Angiotensin 1-7(A1-7) from Angiotensin II, is considered to suppress organ damage by inhibition of the activation of renin-angiotensin system. We recently found that ACE2 deficiency in mice ameliorated insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle with reduced expression of glucose transporter 4 and myocyte enhancer factor 2, an important transcription factor to maintain homeostasis of skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated whether ACE2-A1-7 axis plays a protective role in aging-associated loss of skeletal muscle function in mice...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Joseph J Knapik, Francis G O'Connor
Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is a medical condition whereby damage to skeletal muscle is induced by excessive physical activity in otherwise healthy individuals. The individual performs so much activity that he/ she presumably depletes local muscle energy stores and muscle cells are unable to maintain cellular integrity, resulting in cell damage and the release of cellular contents, with resultant secondary complications. In the military services, the incidence of ER appeared to increase in the period 2004 to 2015...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
María José Acuña, Enrique Brandan
CCN2 or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that regulates several cellular processes. In skeletal muscle, CTGF is a key modulator of fibrogenesis, is increased in pathological conditions such as muscular dystrophies, and plays a major role in the pathology outcome. Overexpression of CTGF in skeletal muscle of wild-type mice results in muscle damage, fibrosis, and reduction of strength. In contrast, a decrease in CTGF in dystrophic mice increases strength and reduces damage and fibrosis...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Carrie E McCurdy, Simon Schenk, Byron Hetrick, Julie Houck, Brian G Drew, Spencer Kaye, Melanie Lashbrook, Bryan C Bergman, Diana L Takahashi, Tyler A Dean, Travis Nemkov, Ilya Gertsman, Kirk C Hansen, Andrew Philp, Andrea L Hevener, Adam J Chicco, Kjersti M Aagaard, Kevin L Grove, Jacob E Friedman
Maternal obesity is proposed to alter the programming of metabolic systems in the offspring, increasing the risk for developing metabolic diseases; however, the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used a nonhuman primate model to examine the impact of a maternal Western-style diet (WSD) alone, or in combination with obesity (Ob/WSD), on fetal skeletal muscle metabolism studied in the early third trimester. We find that fetal muscle responds to Ob/WSD by upregulating fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial complex activity, and metabolic switches (CPT-1, PDK4) that promote lipid utilization over glucose oxidation...
October 6, 2016: JCI Insight
Anastasia Asimakopoulou, Sabine Weiskirchen, Ralf Weiskirchen
Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a secreted protein that belongs to the Lipocalins, a group of transporters of small lipophilic molecules such as steroids, lipopolysaccharides, iron, and fatty acids in circulation. Two decades after its discovery and after a high variety of published findings, LCN2's altered expression has been assigned to critical roles in several pathological organ conditions, including liver injury and steatosis, renal damage, brain injury, cardiomyopathies, muscle-skeletal disorders, lung infection, and cancer in several organs...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Rekik A Muluye, Yuhong Bian, Li Wang, Paulos N Alemu, Huantian Cui, Xiaofei Peng, Shanshan Li
Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Angela Zissler, Peter Steinbacher, Reinhold Zimmermann, Stefan Pittner, Walter Stoiber, Arne C Bathke, Alexandra M Sänger
BACKGROUND: Muscle injuries are among the most common sports-related lesions in athletes; however, optimal treatment remains obscure. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) may be a promising approach in this context, because it has gained increasing importance in tissue regeneration in various medical fields. HYPOTHESIS: ESWT stimulates and accelerates regenerative processes of acute muscle injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study...
October 11, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
Yaira Barranco-Ruiz, Jeronimo Aragón-Vela, Cristina Casals, Antonio Martínez-Amat, Rafael A Casuso, Jesus R Huertas
OBJECTIVE: Controlling antioxidant supplementation in athletes involved in studies related to oxidative stress and muscle damage is the key to ensure results. The aim of this study was to confirm through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis whether well-trained individuals lied during a personal interview when asked if they were taking supplements with antioxidants, and how this could affect oxidative stress, muscle damage, and antioxidant response. METHODS: A total of 94 men, well trained in endurance sports, volunteered in this study...
July 28, 2016: Nutrition
Jairo A Diaz, Mauricio F Murillo, Jhonan A Mendoza, Ana M Barreto, Lina S Poveda, Lina K Sanchez, Laura C Poveda, Katherine T Mora
Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype...
2016: American Journal of Stem Cells
María Emilia Garcia Denegri, Gladys P Teibler, Silvana L Maruñak, David R Hernández, Ofelia C Acosta, Laura C Leiva
Bothrops alternatus snake venom is particularly characterized for inducing a prominent haemorrhage and affecting hemostasis as a consequence of 43.1% of metallo-proteinases and less than 10% of PLA2 (almost all non-myotoxic phospholipases) in its venomics. In addition, myonecrosis is the major local effect in viper envenoming which might lead to permanent sequela. Then, the rebuilding of the microvasculature at the local injured site acquires significance since represents one of the pivotal stages for subsequent skeletal muscle regeneration either at morphological or functional aspects...
October 6, 2016: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
Geoffrey J Kerr, Matthew R McCann, Jennifer K Branch, Anusha Ratneswaran, Michael A Pest, David W Holdsworth, Frank Beier, S Jeffrey Dixon, Cheryle A Séguin
OBJECTIVE: Whole-body vibration (WBV) platforms are commercially available devices that are used clinically as potential treatments for numerous musculoskeletal conditions based on their reported ability to increase bone mineral density and muscle strength. Despite widespread use, there is an alarming lack of understanding of the direct effects of WBV on joint health. Previous work by our lab demonstrated that repeated exposure to WBV using protocols that model those used clinically, induces intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoarthritis-like damage in the knee of skeletally mature, male mice of a single outbred strain (CD-1)...
October 6, 2016: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
Jeong-Seok Kim, Young-Hee Lee, Yong-Uoo Chang, Ho-Keun Yi
Excessive exercise induces an inflammatory response caused by oxidative stress, which delays recovery of damaged muscle fibers. The reduction of inflammatory response is important for skeletal muscle homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is an anti-inflammatory molecule, but the role of PPARγ in skeletal muscle as anti-inflammatory activity is not clear. Thus, this study examined the anti-inflammatory role of PPARγ against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exercised on a treadmill to induce oxidative stress...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry
David Costantini, Shona Smith, Shaun S Killen, Julius Nielsen, John F Steffensen
The free radical theory of ageing predicts that long-lived species should be more resistant to oxidative damage than short-lived species. Although many studies support this theory, recent studies found notable exceptions that challenge the generality of this theory. In this study, we have analysed the oxidative status of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), which has recently been found as the longest living vertebrate animal known to science with a lifespan of at least 272years. As compared to other species, the Greenland shark had body mass-corrected values of muscle glutathione peroxidase and red blood cells protein carbonyls (metric of protein oxidative damage) above 75 percentile and below 25 percentile, respectively...
October 4, 2016: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Mohamed A A Mahdy, Katsuhiko Warita, Yoshinao Z Hosaka
In this study, we investigated the early changes of skeletal muscle damage in response to injuries induced by cardiotoxin (CTX) and glycerol by using both light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Normal, non-dystrophic, adult male mice were used in this study. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were injected either with CTX or glycerol. Samples were collected at intervals starting from 1h up to 4days after injury. Injured muscles were subjected to both histological and ultrastructural analyses. CTX-induced injury caused mitochondrial accumulation and swelling followed by lysis, while glycerol-induced injury caused accumulation of vesicles with focal disruption of the basal lamina, indicating that the injuries have different mechanisms of damage to myofibers...
September 28, 2016: Micron: the International Research and Review Journal for Microscopy
Christopher M Lockwood, Michael D Roberts, Vincent J Dalbo, Abbie E Smith-Ryan, Kristina L Kendall, Jordan R Moon, Jeffrey R Stout
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the chronic effects of different whey protein forms on body composition and performance when supplemented with resistance training. METHODS: Resistance-trained men (N = 56, 21.4 ± 0.4 years, 79.5 ± 1.0 kg) participated in an 8-week resistance training regimen (2 upper-body sessions and 2 lower-body sessions per week) and received one of 4 double-blinded treatments: 30 g/serving carbohydrate placebo (PLA) or 30 g/serving protein from either (a) 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC), (b) high-lactoferrin-containing WPC (WPC-L), or (c) extensively hydrolyzed WPC (WPH)...
October 6, 2016: Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Cynthia Machado Cascabulho, Daniela Gois Beghini, Marcelo Meuser-Batista, Carmen Penido, Andrea Henriques-Pons
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that lead to degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscles and to chronic inflammation. Despite the importance of γδ T cells in many diseases, this cellular subpopulation has not been described in DMD patients or in mdx mice, a widely used mouse model for studying DMD. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to evaluate the migration of γδ T cells to the cardiac muscle of mdx mice and to characterize their phenotype and functional activity...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
Kelsey A Thomas, Michael C Gibbons, John G Lane, Anshuman Singh, Samuel R Ward, Adam J Engler
Full thickness rotator cuff tendon (RCT) tears have long-term effects on RC muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, with lasting damage even after surgical tendon repair. Skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPs) are critical for muscle repair in response to injury, but the inability of RC muscles to recover from chronic RCT tear indicates possible deficits in repair mechanisms. Here we investigated if muscle injury state was a crucial factor during human SMP expansion and differentiation ex vivo. SMPs were isolated from muscles in patients with no, partial-thickness (PT), or full-thickness (FT) RCT tears...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Research: Official Publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Sarah H White, Mary M McDermott, Robert L Sufit, Kate Kosmac, Alex W Bugg, Marta Gonzalez-Freire, Luigi Ferrucci, Lu Tian, Lihui Zhao, Ying Gao, Melina R Kibbe, Michael H Criqui, Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, Charlotte A Peterson
BACKGROUND: Patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) have decreased mobility, which is not fully explained by impaired blood supply to the lower limb. Additionally, reports are conflicted regarding fiber type distribution patterns in PAD, but agree that skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration is impaired. METHODS: To test the hypothesis that reduced muscle fiber oxidative activity and type I distribution are negatively associated with walking performance in PAD, calf muscle biopsies from non-PAD (n = 7) and PAD participants (n = 26) were analyzed immunohistochemically for fiber type and size, oxidative activity, markers of autophagy, and capillary density...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Translational Medicine
Giorgos K Sakellariou, Timothy Pearson, Adam P Lightfoot, Gareth A Nye, Nicola Wells, Ifigeneia I Giakoumaki, Aphrodite Vasilaki, Richard D Griffiths, Malcolm J Jackson, Anne McArdle
Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice...
September 29, 2016: Scientific Reports
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