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pelvic floor exercise

Maria Lucia Campos Gonçalves, Samantha Fernandes, João Batista de Sousa
[Purpose] To assess the influence of moderate physical exercise on pelvic floor muscle electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback signal in female non-athletes. [Subjects and Methods] A prospective, non-randomized study of 90 adult females (age ≥18 years) divided into three groups: Intervention (I), which began physical exercise upon study enrollment; Moderate Exercise (ME), comprising those who already engaged in physical activity; and Sedentary (S), comprising those who had a sedentary lifestyle. All participants underwent EMG biofeedback of the pelvic floor muscles upon study enrollment (T1) and at the end of the third subsequent month (T2)...
February 2018: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Aylin Aydın Sayılan, Ayfer Özbaş
The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME/Kegel) training administered to patients scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy on postprocedural incontinence problems. This study was a randomized controlled trial. Pelvic floor muscle exercises were applied to the procedure group three times a day for 6 months. No exercises were applied to the control group. Incontinence and quality-of-life assessments of the 60 patients in the experimental and control groups were performed on months 0 (10 days after removal of the urinary catheter), 1, 3, and 6 through face-to-face and telephone interviews...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Ceren Orhan, Türkan Akbayrak, Serap Özgül, Emine Baran, Esra Üzelpasaci, Gülbala Nakip, Nejat Özgül, Mehmet Sinan Beksaç
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated whether vaginal tampon training (VTT) combined with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) results in better outcomes than PFMT alone for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: This was a randomized, controlled study. Patients were allocated to either the combined program, consisting of PFMT and VTT over 12 weeks [PFMT and VTT group (n = 24)] or to PFMT alone [PFMT group (n = 24)]. The primary outcome measure was self-reported improvement, while secondary outcome measures were severity of incontinence, quality of life (QoL), urinary parameters, and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) and endurance (PFME)...
March 13, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Ingunn Ludviksdottir, Hildur Hardardottir, Thorgerdur Sigurdardottir, Gudmundur F Ulfarsson
INTRODUCTION: Exercise can stress the pelvic floor muscles. Numerous women experience urinary incontinence while exercising or competing in sports. This study investigated pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary incontinence, and knowledge in contracting pelvic floor muscles among female athletes and untrained women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective case-control study measuring pelvic floor muscle strength using vaginal pressure meas-urement. Participants answered questions regarding general health, urinary incontinence, and knowledge on pelvic floor muscles...
2018: Læknablađiđ
Kara Lauren Barnes, Gena Dunivan, Ashley Jaramillo-Huff, Tessa Krantz, Jennifer Thompson, Peter Jeppson
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify smartphone Kegel and pelvic floor exercise applications (apps) and identify those with superior functionality, features, and accuracy. METHODS: We identified a complete list of Kegel and pelvic floor exercise applications by searching iTunes and Google Play stores for "pelvic floor," "pelvic floor exercises," "Kegel," and "Kegel exercises." We used a modified APPLICATIONS scoring system to evaluate all identified apps...
February 27, 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Susan A Barr, Catrina C Crisp, Amanda B White, Shazia A Malik, Kimberly Kenton
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to identify screening, treatment, and referral practices of primary care physicians (PCPs) for patients with pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) and evaluate awareness of the Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) subspecialty. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of PCPs using a random sample of 1005 American College of Physicians members, stratified by demographic region. Electronic survey content included awareness of FPMRS certification, comfort diagnosing and treating PFDs, and PFD referral patterns for PCPs...
March 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Camille P Vaughan, Donald L Bliwise
Older adults frequently experience nocturia and sleep disturbance concurrently, and problems with sleep resulting from nocturia are a major factor accompanying the bother associated with nocturia. A multicomponent treatment strategy is usually warranted. Initial treatment includes lifestyle modification and behavioral treatment with consideration of pelvic floor muscle exercise-based therapy. Early evidence suggests that behavioral treatment results in similar nocturia reductions compared with the most frequently used drug therapies...
March 2018: Sleep Medicine Clinics
Alexandra Hill, Meryl Alappattu
Background: A non-invasive treatment for urinary incontinence (UI) is surface electromyography (sEMG) biofeedback with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A lack of consensus and evidence exists on the Quality of Life (QoL) outcomes following sEMG biofeedback using surface electrodes at the perineum compared to the more invasive intravaginal probe. This case report examines QoL using sEMG biofeedback at the perineum with PFM training for UI. Study Design: Single subject case report...
May 2017: Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy
Vered Eisenberg, Rachel Kafri
Pelvic floor damage can occur during pregnancy, during childbirth or post-partum, and may be expressed by symptoms such as urinary incontinence, fecal and gas incontinence, sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and chronic pelvic pain. Some of the symptoms, which manifest later in a woman's life, will go unrecognized in the immediate postpartum period. Most women do not mention their general health, unless specifically asked. Physiotherapists, who are adept with the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and the ability to diagnose unique differences, can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum pelvic floor problems...
January 2018: Harefuah
Sandra L Gluppe, Gunvor Hilde, Merete K Tennfjord, Marie E Engh, Kari Bø
Background: Diastasis recti abdominis affects a significant number of women during the prenatal and postnatal period. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of a postpartum training program on prevalence of diastasis recti abdominis. Design: The design was a secondary analysis of an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five primiparous women (mean age 29.8±4.1) were randomized to an exercise or control group...
January 17, 2018: Physical Therapy
Lucas Ithamar, Alberto Galvão de Moura Filho, Marco Aurélio Benedetti Rodrigues, Kelly Cristina Duque Cortez, Vinícius Gomes Machado, Claudia Regina Oliveira de Paiva Lima, Eduarda Moretti, Andrea Lemos
INTRODUCTION: Abdominal hypopressive gymnastics appeared as an alternative to traditional abdominal exercises to promote abdominal muscles strength without overloading the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). To determine the activation level of abdominal muscles and PFM and the posture influence in the level of activation in these muscles during abdominal hypopressive gymnastics, we used surface electromyography in young and healthy multipara women. METHODS: This is an observational study with eutrophic nulliparous women aged between 18 and 35 years, with abdominal skinfold less than or equal to 3 cm and active or irregularly active physical activity...
January 2018: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Adi Lausen, Louise Marsland, Samantha Head, Joanna Jackson, Berthold Lausen
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a distressing condition affecting at least 5 million women in England and Wales. Traditionally, physiotherapy for UI comprises pelvic floor muscle training, but although evidence suggests this can be effective it is also recognised that benefits are often compromised by patient motivation and commitment. In addition, there is increasing recognition that physical symptoms alone are poor indicators of the impact of incontinence on individuals' lives...
January 12, 2018: BMC Women's Health
Bo Ae Lee, Su Jin Kim, Don Kyoung Choi, Ohseong Kwon, Hae Ri Na, Sung Tae Cho
PURPOSE: Pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) is a therapeutic option for urinary incontinence (UI). However, studies of the efficacy of PFME on UI in patients with cognitive impairment (CI) are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of PFME on UI in elderly women with mild CI. METHODS: A total of 150 women with mild CI or Alzheimer disease and UI were screened using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). Cognitive function and behavioral symptoms were evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination and Barthel's Activities of Daily Living...
December 2017: International Neurourology Journal
Kari Bø, Marie Ellstrøm Engh, Gunvor Hilde
BACKGROUND: Today, all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 min of aerobic activity on most days of the week, in addition to perform strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week, and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. OBJECTIVES: To compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥ 30 minutes ≥ 3 times per week) and non-exercisers at mid-pregnancy...
December 26, 2017: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Elaine Cristine Lemes Mateus-Vasconcelos Pt PhD, Aline Moreira Ribeiro Pt MSc, Flávia Ignácio Antônio Pt PhD, Luiz Gustavo de Oliveira Brito PhD, Cristine Homsi Jorge Ferreira
AIM: To undertake a systematic review of the literature on physical therapy methods to facilitate voluntary pelvic floor muscles (PFM) contraction. METHODS: The databases consulted were PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PEDro and CINHAL. The study included randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental trials and systematic reviews. The GRADE scale was used to assess methodological quality...
December 26, 2017: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Thomas A Masterson, John M Masterson, Jessica Azzinaro, Lattoya Manderson, Sanjaya Swain, Ranjith Ramasamy
Background: Male chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms that causes significant impairment and is often challenging to treat. In this prospective study, we evaluated men with CPPS who underwent comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) program. We used the previously validated Genitourinary Pain Index (GUPI) to measure outcomes. Methods: We included 14 men who underwent physical therapy for idiopathic CPPS from October 2015 to October 2016...
October 2017: Translational Andrology and Urology
Ruben Barakat, Marina Vargas, Maia Brik, Irene Fernandez, Javier Gil, Javier Coteron, Belen Santacruz
Placental weight (PW) is a measure commonly used to summarize growth and aspects of placental function. In a normal pregnancy, it is reasonable to assume that PW is related to aspects of the functional capacity of the placenta. The placenta, as the site for all maternal-fetal oxygen and nutrient exchange, influences birth weight and is thus central to a successful pregnancy outcome. PW is the most common way to characterize placental growth, which relates to placental function. With physical exercise becoming an integral part of life for many women, the question of whether exercise during pregnancy has an adverse effect on the growing fetus is very important...
January 1, 2017: Evaluation & the Health Professions
Sania Almousa, Alda Bandin van Loon
Urinary incontinence (UI) has been defined as the complaint of involuntary loss of urine. There is a general belief that UI is experienced almost exclusively by the elderly and women who have given birth. However, epidemiological studies report that young women who are nulliparous also experience UI. The aim of this study was to systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of UI in nulliparous adolescent and middle-aged women and to provide an overview of risk factors associated with UI. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library were systematically searched for eligible studies...
January 2018: Maturitas
Johanna Day de Gennaro, Claire K de Gennaro, Janet M Shaw, Tomasz J Petelenz, Ingrid E Nygaard, Robert W Hitchcock
OBJECTIVES: High intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may influence the development of pelvic floor disorders. We and others have used intravaginal pressure transducers to measure IAP in women during exercise and daily activities, but utilizing the transducer for long-term measurements creates compliance issues. Waist-worn accelerometers are prominent in research and may be a reliable alternative for approximating IAP. We hypothesized that there are pair-wise positive correlations between the mean maximal accelerometer vector magnitude and 2 IAP measurements: mean maximal IAP and area under the curve (AUC)...
November 13, 2017: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Mónica Venegas, Bernardita Carrasco, Romina Casas-Cordero
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To ensure the effectiveness of Physical Therapy for urinary incontinence (UI), it is crucial that patients adhere to treatment in both the long and the short term. Treatment adherence may prevent symptom progression and the need for surgery, which is associated with higher costs and potential complications. Adherence is defined as carrying out a recommended behavioral modification or change. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established that adherence is a multifactorial phenomenon determined by the interaction of five dimensions, which include diverse factors that affect long-term adherence on many levels...
November 2, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
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