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Injury prevention, swimming

Jill Thein-Nissenbaum
The postpartum period in a woman's life is filled with numerous changes, including physical changes, changes in sleep habits, and learning how to best care for a newborn. A common goal among postpartum women is to either begin or resume an active lifestyle, which often includes physical activity such as running, biking and swimming. The postpartum athlete may discover barriers that prevent her from returning to or beginning an exercise routine. These obstacles include muscle weakness, fatigue, depression and physical changes that require exercise modification...
September 2016: Physical Therapy in Sport
Pierre Louge, Mathieu Coulange, Frederic Beneton, Emmanuel Gempp, Olivier Le Pennetier, Maxime Algoud, Lorene Dubourg, Pierre Naibo, Marion Marlinge, Pierre Michelet, Donato Vairo, Nathalie Kipson, François Kerbaul, Yves Jammes, Ian M Jones, Jean-Guillaume Steinberg, Jean Ruf, Régis Guieu, Alain Boussuges, Emmanuel Fenouillet
Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder...
June 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Annika Prien, Margo Mountjoy, Jim Miller, Kevin Boyd, Cees van den Hoogenband, David Gerrard, Mohamed Yahia Cherif, Yifan Lu, Kyriakos Nanousis, Edgar Ivan Ortiz Liscano, Farhad Moradi Shahpar, Astrid Junge
BACKGROUND: Epidemiological information on injury/illness is required to develop effective injury prevention strategies. AIM: To assess the frequency and characteristics of injuries/illnesses (1) in the 4 weeks prior to and (2) during the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) World Championships 2015 compared with 2013 and 2009. METHOD: (1) Athletes answered a retrospective questionnaire, and (2) the medical staff reported injuries/illnesses prospectively during the championships...
June 16, 2016: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Thiago Beltram Marcelino, Patricia Idalina de Lemos Rodrigues, Caroline Peres Klein, Bernardo Gindri Dos Santos, Patrícia Maidana Miguel, Carlos Alexandre Netto, Lenir Orlandi Pereira Silva, Cristiane Matté
Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) represents one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy. The central nervous system injury comprises several mechanisms, including inflammatory, excitotoxicity, and redox homeostasis unbalance leading to cell death and cognitive impairment. Exercise during pregnancy is a potential therapeutic tool due to benefits offered to mother and fetus. Swimming during pregnancy elicits a strong metabolic programming in the offspring's brain, evidenced by increased antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial biogenesis, and neurogenesis...
October 1, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Michele C Hlavsa, Taryn R Gerth, Sarah A Collier, Elizabeth L Dunbar, Gouthami Rao, Gregory Epperson, Becky Bramlett, David F Ludwig, Diana Gomez, Monty M Stansbury, Freeman Miller, Jeffrey Warren, Jim Nichol, Harry Bowman, Bao-An Huynh, Kara M Loewe, Bob Vincent, Amanda L Tarrier, Timothy Shay, Robert Wright, Allison C Brown, Jasen M Kunz, Kathleen E Fullerton, James R Cope, Michael J Beach
PROBLEM/CONDITION: Aquatic facility-associated illness and injury in the United States include disease outbreaks of infectious or chemical etiology, drowning, and pool chemical-associated health events (e.g., respiratory distress or burns). These conditions affect persons of all ages, particularly young children, and can lead to disability or even death. A total of 650 aquatic facility-associated outbreaks have been reported to CDC for 1978-2012. During 1999-2010, drownings resulted in approximately 4,000 deaths each year in the United States...
2016: MMWR. Surveillance Summaries: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries
Gustavo Barbosa Dos Santos, André Gustavo de Oliveira, Luiz Alberto Ferreira Ramos, Maria Cristina Cintra Gomes-Marcondes, Miguel Arcanjo Areas
What is the central question of this study? Can long-term leucine supplementation prevent prolonged strenuous endurance exercise induced cardiac injury? What is the main finding and its importance? Prolonged endurance exercise does not seem to exceed cardiac energetic capacity, hence it does not represent an energy threat to this organ, at least in trained subjects. However, it may induce, in susceptible individuals, a state of cardiac electrical instability, which has been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death...
July 1, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Amalia Tinto, Marta Campanella, Milena Fasano
BACKGROUND: Developing muscle strength and full body stability is essential for the efficient execution of technical moves in synchronised swimming.[1] However, many swimmers find it difficult to control body stability while executing particular figures in water. We evaluated the effects of TRX® suspension training (2 sessions weekly for 6 months on core strength and core stability in young female. METHODS: Twenty synchronised swimmers (Beginners A category, mean age 10±1 years) are divided in Experimental Group (EG; n° 10 athletes) and Control Group (CG; n° 10 athletes)...
May 3, 2016: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Timothy F Mott, Kelly M Latimer
Nearly 4,000 drowning deaths occur annually in the United States, with drowning representing the most common injury-related cause of death in children one to four years of age. Drowning is a process that runs the spectrum from brief entry of liquid into the airways with subsequent clearance and only minor temporary injury, to the prolonged presence of fluid in the lungs leading to lung dysfunction, hypoxia, neurologic and cardiac abnormalities, and death. The World Health Organization has defined drowning as "the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in liquid...
April 1, 2016: American Family Physician
Erman Caner Bulut, Leyla Abueid, Feriha Ercan, Selami Süleymanoğlu, Mehmet Ağırbaşlı, Berrak Ç Yeğen
What is the central question of this study? Could the activation of oxytocin or oestrogen receptors be protective against myocardial injury after ovariectomy? If so, would exercising have an additional ameliorating effect? What is the main finding and its importance? The results revealed that when accompanied by exercise, both oestrogen receptor agonists and oxytocin improved cardiac dysfunction, inhibited the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced myocardial injury in ovariectomized female rats, suggesting a new approach for protecting postmenopausal women against ischaemia-induced myocardial injury...
May 1, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Elena Moretti, Lucia Mazzi, Claudia Bonechi, Maria Cristina Salvatici, Francesca Iacoponi, Claudio Rossi, Giulia Collodel
A strategy to circumvent the poor polyphenols bioavailability is to load these compounds into liposomes. We evaluated the in vitro effects of quercetin (Q) and Q-loaded liposomes (QLL, 30, 50, 100μM) on motility, viability and chromatin integrity of swim-up selected human sperm. Antioxidant power was assayed against tert-butylhydroperoxide induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) using C11-BODIPY581/591 fluorescent probe and transmission electron microscopy. QLL showed decreased toxicity for sperm motility and viability and increased DNA damage compared to Q...
April 2016: Reproductive Toxicology
Jun Xie, Guixin He, Qinhua Chen, Jiayin Sun, Qin Dai, Jianrong Lu, Guannan Li, Han Wu, Ran Li, Jianzhou Chen, Wei Xu, Biao Xu
Cardiac hypertrophy can be broadly classified as either physiological or pathological. Physiological stimulus such as exercise cause adaptive cardiac hypertrophy and normal heart function. Pathological stimulus such as hypertension and aortic valvular stenosis cause maladaptive cardiac remodeling and ultimately heart failure. Syndecan 4(synd4) is a transmembrane proteoglycan and identified to be involved in cardiac adaptation after injury. Whether it takes part in physiological cardiac hypertrophy is unclear...
January 21, 2016: Molecular Medicine
Elizabeth E Hibberd, Kevin Laudner, David J Berkoff, Kristen L Kucera, Bing Yu, Joseph B Myers
CONTEXT: Alterations to upper extremity physical characteristics of competitive swimmers (posture, range of motion [ROM], and subacromial-space distance) are commonly attributed to cumulative training load during a swimmer's competitive career. However, this accepted clinical belief has not been established in the literature. It is important to understand whether alterations in posture and associated physical characteristics occur as a result of sport training or factors other than swimming participation to better understand injury risk and possible interventions...
January 2016: Journal of Athletic Training
Irina C Chis, Andrei Coseriu, Ramona Simedrea, Adrian Oros, Andras L Nagy, Simona Clichici
BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic endocrine-metabolic disorder associated with endothelial dysfunction. Hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and abnormal nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation are the major causal factors in the development of endothelial dysfunction in DM. The prevention of endothelial dysfunction may be a first target against the appearance of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. We have investigated the synergistic protective effects of quercetin administration and moderate exercise training on thoracic aorta injuries induced by diabetes...
2015: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Fernando da Silva Fiorin, Ana P de Oliveira Ferreira, Leandro R Ribeiro, Luiz F A Silva, Mauro R T de Castro, Luís R H da Silva, Mauro E P da Silveira, Ana P P Zemolin, Fernando Dobrachinski, Sara Marchesan de Oliveira, Jeferson L Franco, Félix A Soares, Ana F Furian, Mauro S Oliveira, Michele R Fighera, Luiz F Freire Royes
Throughout the world, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of disability, which can include deficits in motor function and memory, as well as acquired epilepsy. Although some studies have shown the beneficial effects of physical exercise after TBI, the prophylactic effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we demonstrated that TBI induced by fluid percussion injury (FPI) in adult male Wistar rats caused early motor impairment (24 h), learning deficit (15 days), spontaneous epileptiform events (SEE), and hilar cell loss in the hippocampus (35 days) after TBI...
July 15, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Annette K Hoskin, Anne-Marie E Yardley, Kate Hanman, Geoffrey Lam, David A Mackey
PURPOSE: To identify the causes of sports-related eye and adnexal injuries in children in Perth, Western Australia, to determine which sporting activities pose the highest risk of eye and adnexal injury to children. METHODS: We performed a 12-year retrospective review of children admitted to hospital from 2002 to 2013 with sports-related ocular and adnexal eye injuries. The main outcome measures were the cause and type of ocular and adnexal injuries, age and gender risk factors...
September 2016: Acta Ophthalmologica
Sara Low, Michael Kern, Alfred Atanda
First-rib stress fractures have been described in adolescent athletes in various sports, with only one prior case report of first-rib stress fractures in an adolescent female swimmer. There is a need for research on the cause, management, and prevention of these injuries as they lead to significant morbidity and critical time away from sport for these aspiring athletes. We aimed to describe first-rib stress fractures as a potential cause for non-specific atraumatic chronic shoulder pain in adolescent swimmers and to discuss the different presentations, unique risk factors, treatment, and potential injury prevention strategies of such fractures...
2016: Journal of Sports Sciences
Sheri P Silfies, David Ebaugh, Marisa Pontillo, Courtney M Butowicz
BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. OBJECTIVES: 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability...
September 2015: Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy
Andrew W Nichols
Competitive swimmers are affected by several musculoskeletal and medical complaints that are unique to the sport. 'Swimmer's shoulder,' the most common overuse injury, is usually caused by some combination of impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy, scapular dyskinesis, and instability. The condition may be treated with training modifications, stroke error correction, and strengthening exercises targeting the rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers, and core. Implementation of prevention programs to reduce the prevalence of shoulder pathology is crucial...
September 2015: Current Sports Medicine Reports
Sheri P Silfies, David Ebaugh, Marisa Pontillo, Courtney M Butowicz
BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. OBJECTIVES: 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability...
September 1, 2015: Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy
Belinda A Wallis, Kerrianne Watt, Richard C Franklin, Roy M Kimble
BACKGROUND: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) children are at greater risk of drowning than other children, however little is known about drowning of Indigenous children. This study identifies the previously unpublished incidence and characteristics of fatal and non-fatal drowning in Indigenous children and adolescents. METHODS: Retrospective data (Jan 2002-Dec 2008) on fatal and non-fatal drowning events among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Queensland residents aged 0-19 years were obtained from multiple sources across the continuum of care (pre-hospital; emergency department; admitted patients; fatality) and manually linked...
2015: BMC Public Health
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