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massive hemorrhage

Yasuhiko Hayashi, Masahiro Oishi, Issei Fukui, Yasuo Sasagawa, Yasuhiro Aida, Mitsutoshi Nakada
BACKGROUND: In Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs), inflammation by the cyst contents infrequently spreads to the surrounding structures. Calcification, which is regarded as a consequence of chronic inflammation of the cyst wall, can rarely be found in RCCs, and moreover, ossification is extremely rare. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 60-year-old woman presented with headaches, fatigue and weight loss due to panhypopituitarism. Magnetic Resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion in the sellar region, which was comprised of two different parts, with hypointensity anteriorly and hyperintensity posteriorly on T1-weighted image (WI), and the rim with significant hypointensity entirely on T2-WI...
October 18, 2016: World Neurosurgery
P Michel, D Wähnert, M Freistühler, M G Laukoetter, S Rehberg, M J Raschke, P Garcia
BACKGROUND: Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome is well known as a life-threatening complication in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. Massive crystalloid fluid resuscitation has been identified as the most important risk factor. The time interval from hospital admittance to the development of manifest abdominal compartment syndrome is usually greater than 24 hours. In the absence of any direct abdominal trauma, we observed a rapidly evolving secondary abdominal compartment syndrome shortly after hospital admittance associated with massive transfusion of blood products and only moderate crystalloid resuscitation...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Medical Case Reports
Chase L Andreason, Timothy H Pohlman
The timely recognition of shock secondary to hemorrhage from severe facial trauma or as a complication of complex oral and maxillofacial surgery presents formidable challenges. Specific hemostatic disorders are induced by hemorrhage and several extreme homeostatic imbalances may appear during or after resuscitation. Damage control resuscitation has evolved from massive transfusion to a more complex therapeutic paradigm that includes hemodynamic resuscitation, hemostatic resuscitation, and homeostatic resuscitation...
November 2016: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
Shigeki Matsubara
Conservative management (leaving the placenta in situ) for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP: accreta, increta, percreta) has been repeatedly discussed in AOGS (1, 2). Delayed hemorrhage and infection are important adverse events. Especially, delayed hemorrhage required hysterectomy 3-9 months post-cesarean section in 22-58% of cases (1, 3), often performed as an emergency surgery (1, 3). Although delayed hysterectomy is not always associated with massive bleeding, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked gadolinium enhancement (marked blood flow) in the placental-bed-myometrium on post-cesarean day 34 (4), suggesting that hemorrhage may be serious during delayed hysterectomy at least up to one month post-cesarean...
October 14, 2016: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
A Soumana, M Kamaye, M Mamane, D Mamoudou, A Samailla, A Moussa, H Dima, T Guéro
We report a fatal case due to a massive attack by a swarm of bees in a nine-year-old child. The accident was fatal because of two aggravating factors: the cephalic location and the large number of stings (about 300). Complications were coagulopathy, anemia, hemorrhage, coma, and oligoanuria. Support was symptomatic at a facility second level. The outcome was fatal within 14 days. In view of the encountered difficulties, we recommend to build written protocols for the management of envenomation in any health training reference...
October 13, 2016: Bulletin de la Société de Pathologie Exotique
Prashant R Rao, Bhushan D Thombre, Ajit Patel, Anurag Dandekar, Rajinder Singh, Rajeev M Joshi
Arterial pseudoaneurysms are relatively rare complications of the vascular system. Many cases may remain asymptomatic for a lifetime only to be discovered incidentally, whereas others may cause fatal hemorrhage. Majority of cases present with local compressive symptoms. Rarely, it has been implicated as an etiology for gastrointestinal (GI) bleed by eroding into an adjacent bowel, with splanchnic pseudoaneurysm being more commonly responsible as compared to peripheral ones. Although rare, they are an important consideration because of the high mortality rate...
October 2016: Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Beata Pucher, Jaroslaw Szydlowski, Wieslaw Smoczyk, Katarzyna Jonczyk-Potoczna, Michal Grzegorowski, Aleksandra Korytowska
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are the most common surgical procedures in pediatric otolaryngology. The incidence of primary hemorrhage after tonsillectomy in children ranges from 0.38 to 6%. The prevalence of secondary bleeding occurs in 0.5%-9.3% cases [1]. Authors present a case of an 11-year-old girl who experienced 6 delayed, massive post-tonsillectomy bleedings as a result of presence of vascular malformation and the activation of collateral circulation as a result of the left ECA ligature.
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Nobumasa Ohara, Yasuyuki Uemura, Naomi Mezaki, Keita Kimura, Masanori Kaneko, Hirohiko Kuwano, Katsuya Ebe, Toshio Fujita, Takeshi Komeyama, Hiroyuki Usuda, Yuto Yamazaki, Takashi Maekawa, Hironobu Sasano, Kenzo Kaneko, Kyuzi Kamoi
BACKGROUND: Pheochromocytomas are rare catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors. Hypertension secondary to pheochromocytoma is often paroxysmal, and patients occasionally present with sudden attacks of alternating hypertension and hypotension. Spontaneous, extensive necrosis within the tumor that is associated with catecholamine crisis is an infrequent complication of adrenal pheochromocytoma, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. CASE PRESENTATION: A 69-year-old Japanese man developed acute-onset episodic headaches, palpitations, and chest pains...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Medical Case Reports
Manoj Kumar, Sanjeev Bhoi, Sujata Mohanty, Vineet Kumar Kamal, D N Rao, Pravas Mishra, Sagar Galwankar
BACKGROUND: Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is the major leading cause of death after trauma. Up to 50% of early deaths are due to massive hemorrhage. Excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokine and hypercatecholamine induces hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) apoptosis, leading to multiorgan failure and death. However, still, result remains elusive for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) behavior in trauma HS (T/HS). OBJECTIVES: Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the in vitro HSCs behavior with or without recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) alone, and combination with rhEPO + rhGM-CSF + rhIL-3 (EG3) in T/HS patients...
July 2016: International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science
Zensho Ito, Mikio Kajihara, Yasunobu Kobayashi, Tomoya Kanai, Yoshihiro Matsumoto, Kazuki Takakura, Toyokazu Yukawa, Toshifumi Ohkusa, Seita Koyama, Hiroo Imazu, Hiroshi Arakawa, Mitsuru Ohata, Shigeo Koido
Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Because patients present with no specific symptoms, the cancer can grow undetected and most cases are diagnosed too late for resection. We present the case of a 78-year-old Japanese man admitted to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. A total gastrectomy had previously been performed on the patient to treat gastric cancer. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy was performed to control the bleeding from varices over the anastomosis...
May 2016: Case Reports in Gastroenterology
Bryce Alexander, Samantha Britton, Raimundo Barbosa-Barros, Andrés R Pérez-Riera, Izabel Carminda de Mourão Matos, Przemyslaw Guzik, Adrian Baranchuk
Transient ST-segment elevation may be caused by conditions other than myocardial ischemia, among them intracranial hemorrhage. Recognition of the underlying etiology of these ST-segment changes is key because of the vastly different therapies used to treat them. We describe the case of a patient with massive transient J-waves and ST-segment elevation in the context of an intracranial hemorrhage.
September 24, 2016: Journal of Electrocardiology
Martin W Besser, Stephen G MacDonald
Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient's fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations...
2016: Journal of Blood Medicine
Melvin E Stone, Stanley Kalata, Anna Liveris, Zachary Adorno, Shira Yellin, Edward Chao, Srinivas H Reddy, Michael Jones, Carlos Vargas, Sheldon Teperman
BACKGROUND: Critical administration threshold (≥3 units of packed red blood cells/h or CAT+) has been proposed as a new definition for massive transfusion (MT) that includes volume and rate of blood transfusion. CAT+ has been shown to eliminate survivor bias and be a better predictor of mortality than the traditional MT (>10 units/24h). End-tidal CO2 (ET CO2) negatively correlates with lactate and is an early predictor of shock in trauma patients. We conducted a pilot study to test the hypothesis that low ET CO2 on admission predicts CAT+...
July 5, 2016: Injury
Sarwar Noori Mahmood, Hewa Mahmood Toffeq
Background: Percutaneous nephrostolithotomy is an important approach for removing kidney stones. Puncturing and dilatation are two mandatory steps in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Uncommonly, during dilatation, the dilators can cause direct injury to the main renal vein or to their tributaries. Case Presentation: A 75-year-old female underwent PCNL for partial staghorn stone in the left kidney. During puncturing and dilatation, renal vein tributary was injured, and the nephroscope entered the renal vein and inferior vena cava, which was clearly recognized...
2016: J Endourol Case Rep
Andra H James, Chad Grotegut, Homa Ahmadzia, Cathleen Peterson-Layne, Evelyn Lockhart
The purpose of this article is to review the use of blood products and hemostatic agents in the management of coagulopathy at the time of postpartum hemorrhage. Blood product administration strategies are broadly reviewed, including the role of the blood bank, the role of massive transfusion protocols, the role of laboratory monitoring, and the role of anesthesia management. Aspects of patient blood management are discussed. The concept refers to an evidence-based, comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to optimizing the care of patients who might need transfusion and includes measures to avoid or minimize transfusion such as preoperative anemia management, cell salvage, and the use of hemostatic medication to reduce bleeding...
October 3, 2016: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
Samira Yadegari, Askar Ghorbani, S Roohollah Miri, Mohammad Abdollahi, Mohsen Rostami
INTRODUCTION: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. METHODS: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed...
October 2016: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
C Caleb Butts, Kelly Bose, M Amin Frotan, Juvonda Hodge, Salil Gulati
INTRODUCTION: One of the primary intraoperative challenges during burn surgery is to adequately excise the burn while avoiding massive hemorrhage. This has become increasingly important, as we see more burn patients that are older and with more medical comorbidities. While adequate excision down to healthy tissues for deep burns is essential for skin graft to take, it also leads to active bleeding that can be a challenge to control. Good hemostasis is imperative as a hematoma is the most common cause of graft loss...
September 19, 2016: Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Rakesh Hasabe, Kumud Gupta, Pallavi Rathode
INTRODUCTION: Conventionally postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) has been defined as blood loss of more than 500 ml following vaginal delivery and 1000 ml following a cesarean section [Pritchard et al. in Am J Obstet Gynecol 84(10):1271-1282, (1962)]. Another definition labels PPH as any blood loss which causes a 10 % drop in hematocrit [Combs et al. in Obstet Gynecol 77:69-76, (1991)] or which threatens the hemodynamic stability of the patient and necessitates blood transfusion [Prendiville et al...
October 2016: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of India
Julien Pottecher, François-Xavier Ageron, Clémence Fauché, Denis Chemla, Eric Noll, Jacques Duranteau, Laurent Chapiteau, Jean-François Payen, Pierre Bouzat
BACKGROUND: Early and accurate detection of severe hemorrhage is critical for a timely trigger of massive transfusion (MT). Hemodynamic indices combining heart rate (HR) and either systolic (shock index [SI]) or pulse pressure (PP) (PP/HR ratio) have been shown to track blood loss during hemorrhage. The present study assessed the accuracy of prehospital SI and PP/HR ratio to predict subsequent MT, using the gray-zone approach. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis (January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011) of a prospectively developed trauma registry (TRENAU), in which the triage scheme combines patient severity and hospital facilities...
October 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Jinlong Zhang, Shengzheng Wu, Yongliang Liu, Lu Qiao, Wenhong Gao, Weiguo Zhang, Zheng Liu
Previous studies have shown a unique method to disrupt tumor vasculature using pulsed, high-pressure amplitude therapeutic ultrasound combined with microbubbles. In this study, we attempted to destroy the prostate vasculature of canine prostates using microbubble-enhanced ultrasound (MEUS) and prothrombin. The prostates of 43 male mongrel canines were surgically exposed. Twenty-two prostates were treated using MEUS (n = 11) or MEUS and prothrombin (PMEUS, n = 11). The other 21 prostates, which were treated using microbubbles (n = 7), ultrasound (n = 7) or prothrombin (n = 7) only, served as the controls...
2016: PloS One
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