Read by QxMD icon Read

Gene network evolution

Daniel Nichol, Mark Robertson-Tessi, Peter Jeavons, Alexander R A Anderson
Non-genetic variation in phenotypes, or bet-hedging, has been observed as a driver of drug resistance in both bacterial infections and cancers. Here, we study how bet-hedging emerges in the genotype-phenotype mapping through a simple interaction model: a molecular switch. We use simple Chemical Reaction Networks to implement stochastic switches that map gene products to phenotypes and investigate the impact of structurally distinct mappings on the evolution of phenotypic heterogeneity. Bet-hedging naturally emerges within this model and is robust to evolutionary loss through mutations to both the expression of individual genes and to the network itself...
October 21, 2016: Genetics
Daifeng Wang, Fei He, Sergei Maslov, Mark Gerstein
Gene expression is controlled by the combinatorial effects of regulatory factors from different biological subsystems such as general transcription factors (TFs), cellular growth factors and microRNAs. A subsystem's gene expression may be controlled by its internal regulatory factors, exclusively, or by external subsystems, or by both. It is thus useful to distinguish the degree to which a subsystem is regulated internally or externally-e.g., how non-conserved, species-specific TFs affect the expression of conserved, cross-species genes during evolution...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Hyejung Won, Luis de la Torre-Ubieta, Jason L Stein, Neelroop N Parikshak, Jerry Huang, Carli K Opland, Michael J Gandal, Gavin J Sutton, Farhad Hormozdiari, Daning Lu, Changhoon Lee, Eleazar Eskin, Irina Voineagu, Jason Ernst, Daniel H Geschwind
Three-dimensional physical interactions within chromosomes dynamically regulate gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. However, the 3D organization of chromosomes during human brain development and its role in regulating gene networks dysregulated in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, are unknown. Here we generate high-resolution 3D maps of chromatin contacts during human corticogenesis, permitting large-scale annotation of previously uncharacterized regulatory relationships relevant to the evolution of human cognition and disease...
October 19, 2016: Nature
Steven J Burgess, Ignasi Granero-Moya, Mathieu J Grangé-Guermente, Chris Boursnell, Matthew J Terry, Julian M Hibberd
C4 photosynthesis acts as a carbon concentrating mechanism that leads to large increases in photosynthetic efficiency. The C4 pathway is found in more than 60 plant lineages(1) but the molecular enablers of this evolution are poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how non-photosynthetic proteins in the ancestral C3 system have repeatedly become strongly expressed and integrated into photosynthesis gene regulatory networks in C4 leaves. Here, we provide clear evidence that in C3 leaves, genes encoding key enzymes of the C4 pathway are already co-regulated with photosynthesis genes and are controlled by both light and chloroplast-to-nucleus signalling...
October 17, 2016: Nature Plants
Nídia Cangi, Jonathan L Gordon, Laure Bournez, Valérie Pinarello, Rosalie Aprelon, Karine Huber, Thierry Lefrançois, Luís Neves, Damien F Meyer, Nathalie Vachiéry
The disease, Heartwater, caused by the Anaplasmataceae E. ruminantium, represents a major problem for tropical livestock and wild ruminants. Up to now, no effective vaccine has been available due to a limited cross protection of vaccinal strains on field strains and a high genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium within geographical locations. To address this issue, we inferred the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 E. ruminantium isolates circulating worldwide using Multilocus Sequence Typing based on lipA, lipB, secY, sodB, and sucA genes...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Madhuri A Inupakutika, Soham Sengupta, Amith R Devireddy, Rajeev K Azad, Ron Mittler
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the regulation of many biological processes in plants. Nonetheless, they are considered highly reactive and toxic to cells. Owing to their toxicity, as well as their important role in signaling, the level of ROS in cells needs to be tightly regulated. The ROS gene network, encoding a highly redundant arsenal of ROS scavenging mechanisms and an array of enzymes involved in ROS production, regulates ROS metabolism and signaling in plants. In this article, we review the role of the ROS gene network in plants and examine how it evolved...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Botany
Trey K Sato, Mary Tremaine, Lucas S Parreiras, Alexander S Hebert, Kevin S Myers, Alan J Higbee, Maria Sardi, Sean J McIlwain, Irene M Ong, Rebecca J Breuer, Ragothaman Avanasi Narasimhan, Mick A McGee, Quinn Dickinson, Alex La Reau, Dan Xie, Mingyuan Tian, Jennifer L Reed, Yaoping Zhang, Joshua J Coon, Chris Todd Hittinger, Audrey P Gasch, Robert Landick
The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically...
October 2016: PLoS Genetics
Gabriel Cabot, Carla López-Causapé, Alain A Ocampo-Sosa, Lea M Sommer, María Ángeles Domínguez, Laura Zamorano, Carlos Juan, Fe Tubau, Cristina Rodríguez, Bartolomé Moyà, Carmen Peña, Luis Martínez-Martínez, Patrick Plesiat, Antonio Oliver
Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used for the characterization of the, frequently extensively-drug resistant (XDR), P. aeruginosa high-risk clone ST175. A total of eighteen ST175 isolates recovered from 8 different Spanish hospitals were analyzed; four isolates from four different French hospitals were included for comparison. The typical resistance profile of ST175 included penicillins, cephalosporins, monobactams, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. In the phylogenetic analysis, the four French isolates clustered together with the two isolates from one of the Spanish regions...
October 10, 2016: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
D Gowanlock R Tervo, Bum-Yeol Hwang, Sarada Viswanathan, Thomas Gaj, Maria Lavzin, Kimberly D Ritola, Sarah Lindo, Susan Michael, Elena Kuleshova, David Ojala, Cheng-Chiu Huang, Charles R Gerfen, Jackie Schiller, Joshua T Dudman, Adam W Hantman, Loren L Looger, David V Schaffer, Alla Y Karpova
Efficient retrograde access to projection neurons for the delivery of sensors and effectors constitutes an important and enabling capability for neural circuit dissection. Such an approach would also be useful for gene therapy, including the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by pathological spread through functionally connected and highly distributed networks. Viral vectors, in particular, are powerful gene delivery vehicles for the nervous system, but all available tools suffer from inefficient retrograde transport or limited clinical potential...
October 6, 2016: Neuron
Boris H Kramer, G Sander van Doorn, Franz J Weissing, Ido Pen
The extraordinarily long lifespans of queens (and kings) in eusocial insects and the strikingly large differences in life expectancy between workers and queens challenge our understanding of the evolution of aging and provide unique opportunities for studying the causes underlying adaptive variation in lifespan within species. Here we review the major evolutionary theories of aging, focusing on their scope and limitations when applied to social insects. We show that reproductive division of labor, interactions between kin, caste-specific gene regulation networks, and the integration of colony-level trade-offs with individual-level trade-offs provide challenges to the classical theories We briefly indicate how these challenges could be met in future models of adaptive phenotypic plasticity in lifespan between and within different castes...
August 2016: Current Opinion in Insect Science
Martine Devic, Thomas Roscoe
Networks controlling developmental or metabolic processes in plants are often complex as a consequence of the duplication and specialisation of the regulatory genes as well as the numerous levels of transcriptional and post-transcriptional controls added during evolution. Networks serve to accommodate multicellular complexity and increase robustness to environmental changes. Mathematical simplification by regrouping genes or pathways in a limited number of hubs has facilitated the construction of models for complex traits...
November 2016: Plant Science: An International Journal of Experimental Plant Biology
Kristopher J L Irizarry, Randall L Bryden
Color variation provides the opportunity to investigate the genetic basis of evolution and selection. Reptiles are less studied than mammals. Comparative genomics approaches allow for knowledge gained in one species to be leveraged for use in another species. We describe a comparative vertebrate analysis of conserved regulatory modules in pythons aimed at assessing bioinformatics evidence that transcription factors important in mammalian pigmentation phenotypes may also be important in python pigmentation phenotypes...
2016: Advances in Bioinformatics
Kewei Feng, Fuyan Liu, Jinwei Zou, Guangwei Xing, Pingchuan Deng, Weining Song, Wei Tong, Xiaojun Nie
Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Weilin Peng, Ruijie Song, Murat Acar
Genetic noise together with genome duplication and volume changes during cell cycle are significant contributors to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. How can cells buffer the effects of these unavoidable epigenetic and genetic variations on phenotypes that are sensitive to such variations? Here we show that a simple network motif that is essential for network-dosage compensation can reduce the effects of extrinsic noise on the network output. Using natural and synthetic gene networks with and without the network motif, we measure gene network activity in single yeast cells and find that the activity of the compensated network is significantly lower in noise compared with the non-compensated network...
October 3, 2016: Nature Communications
Jianghong Wu, Husile Gong, Yongsheng Bai, Wenguang Zhang
Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human...
2016: BioMed Research International
H J Yu, Y Kai, J-K Kim
This paper presents preliminary data on the genetic diversity and population structure of Hyporhamphus sajori by analysing a 510 bp sequence in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and eight polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci. The H. sajori individuals from different locations were indistinguishable from one another based on mtDNA variation, as demonstrated with a neighbour-joining tree and minimum spanning network analysis. Low level of genetic diversity and the absence of population structure in H...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Fish Biology
Jaime Iranzo, Eugene V Koonin, David Prangishvili, Mart Krupovic
: Archaea and particularly hyperthermophilic crenarchaea are hosts to many unusual viruses with diverse virion shapes and distinct gene compositions. As is typical of viruses in general, there are no universal genes in the archaeal virosphere. Therefore, to obtain a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary relationships between viruses, network analysis methods are more productive than traditional phylogenetic approaches. Here we present a comprehensive comparative analysis of genomes and proteomes from all currently known taxonomically classified and unclassified, cultivated and uncultivated archaeal viruses...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Virology
Breda M Zimkus, Lucinda P Lawson, Michael Barej, Christopher D Barratt, Alan Channing, Katrina M Dash, J Maximilian Dehling, Louis Du Preez, Philip-Sebastian Gehring, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, James Harvey, Jos Kielgast, Chifundera Kusamba, Zoltán T Nagy, Maciej Pabijan, Johannes Penner, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Miguel Vences, Stefan Lötters
The Mascarene ridged frog, Ptychadena mascareniensis, is a species complex that includes numerous lineages occurring mostly in humid savannas and open forests of mainland Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles, and the Mascarene Islands. Sampling across this broad distribution presents an opportunity to examine the genetic differentiation within this complex and to investigate how the evolution of bioclimatic niches may have shaped current biogeographic patterns. Using model-based phylogenetic methods and molecular-clock dating, we constructed a time-calibrated molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the group based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and the nuclear RAG1 gene from 173 individuals...
September 21, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Philippe Gambette, Leo van Iersel, Steven Kelk, Fabio Pardi, Celine Scornavacca
Phylogenetic networks are increasingly used in evolutionary biology to represent the history of species that have undergone reticulate events such as horizontal gene transfer, hybrid speciation and recombination. One of the most fundamental questions that arise in this context is whether the evolution of a gene with one copy in all species can be explained by a given network. In mathematical terms, this is often translated in the following way: is a given phylogenetic tree contained in a given phylogenetic network? Recently this tree containment problem has been widely investigated from a computational perspective, but most studies have only focused on the topology of the phylogenies, ignoring a piece of information that, in the case of phylogenetic trees, is routinely inferred by evolutionary analyses: branch lengths...
September 2016: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology
Daisuke Urano, Natsumi Maruta, Yuri Trusov, Richard Stoian, Qingyu Wu, Ying Liang, Dinesh Kumar Jaiswal, Leena Thung, David Jackson, José Ramón Botella, Alan M Jones
Signaling proteins evolved diverse interactions to provide specificity for distinct stimuli. Signaling complexity in the G protein (heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein) network was achieved in animals through subunit duplication and incremental evolution. By combining comprehensive and quantitative phenotypic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana with protein evolution informatics, we found that plant heterotrimeric G protein machinery evolved by a saltational (jumping) process. Sequence similarity scores mapped onto tertiary structures, and biochemical validation showed that the extra-large Gα (XLG) subunit evolved extensively in the charophycean algae (an aquatic green plant) by gene duplication and gene fusion...
2016: Science Signaling
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"