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Giovanni Cirillo, Vincenzo Todisco, Gioacchino Tedeschi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 11, 2016: Neurology
Nicolina E Savvaidou, Lazaros C Triarhou
Professor Emil Redlich (1866-1930) of the University of Vienna was born 150 years ago. Raised in a humble environment, he became an eminent researcher and neurology scholar, and succeeded in laying some of the key foundations of neuroanatomy and neuropathology. His name is linked to medical eponyms that define the dorsal root entry zone into the spinal cord, epidemic disseminated encephalomyelitis, narcolepsy, senile plaques and dementia. As its first director, he managed to organize the Maria-Theresien-Schlössel into a first-class neuropsychiatric hospital...
October 21, 2016: European Neurology
Joe Bathelt, Duncan Astle, Jessica Barnes, F Lucy Raymond, Kate Baker
Childhood speech and language deficits are highly prevalent and are a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it is difficult to investigate the underlying causal pathways because many diagnostic groups have a heterogeneous aetiology. Studying disorders with a shared genetic cause and shared cognitive deficits can provide crucial insight into the cellular mechanisms and neural systems that give rise to those impairments. The current study investigated structural brain differences of individuals with mutations in ZDHHC9, which is associated with a specific neurodevelopmental phenotype including prominent speech and language impairments and intellectual disability...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
Gabriella Szatmáry
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article presents an imaging-based approach to the differential diagnosis of visual symptoms. RECENT FINDINGS: Many neurologic disorders may present with visual symptoms. Therefore, neurologists must be familiar with the array of pathophysiologic processes that cause visual symptoms. Orbital imaging is challenging owing to the small structures and different tissue interfaces within and surrounding the orbital compartment. Some of the emerging three-dimensional MRI sequences are promising and compare well with high-resolution two-dimensional sequences in the orbits...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Heather Smith, Vignessh Kumar, Julia Prusik, Sujoy Phookan, Julie G Pilitsis
BACKGROUND: Although thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as an effective therapy for refractory tremor in Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, reports investigating the efficacy of posterior subthalamic area (PSA) DBS for severe, debilitating tremors continue to emerge. However, questions regarding the optimal anatomical target, surgical approach, programming paradigms and effectiveness compared to other targets remain. OBJECTIVES: In this report, we aimed to review the current literature to assess different stereotactic techniques, anatomical considerations, adverse effects and stimulation settings in PSA DBS...
October 12, 2016: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
Toshiro Fujimoto, Eiichi Okumura, Atsushi Kodabashi, Kouzou Takeuchi, Toshiaki Otsubo, Katsumi Nakamura, Kazutaka Yatsushiro, Masaki Sekine, Shinichiro Kamiya, Susumu Shimooki, Toshiyo Tamura
We studied sex-related differences in gamma oscillation during an auditory oddball task, using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography assessment of imaginary coherence (IC). We obtained a statistical source map of event-related desynchronization (ERD) / event-related synchronization (ERS), and compared females and males regarding ERD / ERS. Based on the results, we chose respectively seed regions for IC determinations in low (30-50 Hz), mid (50-100 Hz) and high gamma (100-150 Hz) bands. In males, ERD was increased in the left posterior cingulate cortex (CGp) at 500 ms in the low gamma band, and in the right caudal anterior cingulate cortex (cACC) at 125 ms in the mid-gamma band...
2016: Open Neuroimaging Journal
Anjali Sankar, Tianhao Zhang, Bilwaj Gaonkar, Jimit Doshi, Guray Erus, Sergi G Costafreda, Lauren Marangell, Christos Davatzikos, Cynthia H Y Fu
BACKGROUND: At present, we do not have any biological tests which can contribute towards a diagnosis of depression. Neuroimaging measures have shown some potential as biomarkers for diagnosis. However, participants have generally been from the same ethnic background while the applicability of a biomarker would require replication in individuals of diverse ethnicities. AIMS: We sought to examine the diagnostic potential of the structural neuroanatomy of depression in a sample of a wide ethnic diversity...
July 2016: BJPsych Open
Simone Hearps, Marc Seal, Vicki Anderson, Maria McCarthy, Madeleine Connellan, Peter Downie, Cinzia De Luca
Cognitive late-effects have been identified in patients treated with chemotherapy-only protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), yet the underlying neuropathology is not well understood. This review synthesized recent findings from eight articles investigating the relationship between neurocognitive and neuroimaging outcomes for patients treated for ALL with chemotherapy-only protocols. Reported cognitive domains, imaging methods, and neuroanatomy examined were variable. Despite this, 62.5% (n = 5) of the reviewed studies found a significant relationship between cognitive and imaging outcomes...
October 3, 2016: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Jaak Panksepp
During the past half century of research with preclinical animal models, affective neuroscience has helped identify and illuminate the functional neuroanatomies and neurochemistries of seven primary process, i.e., genetically provided emotional systems of mammalian brains. All are subcortically localized, allowing animal models to guide the needed behavioral and neuroscientific analyses at levels of detail that cannot be achieved through human research, including modern brain imaging. They consist of the following neuronal processes: SEEKING/Enthusiasm, RAGE/Anger, FEAR/Anxiety, sexual LUST/Passion, maternal CARE/Nurturance, separation-distress PANIC/Grief and PLAY/Social Joy...
October 2, 2016: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
Adam J O Dede, Christine N Smith
It is well established that patients with memory impairment have more difficulty retrieving memories from the recent past relative to the remote past and that damage to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) plays a key role in this pattern of impairment. The precise role of the MTL and how it may interact with other brain regions remains an area of active research. We investigated the role of structures in a memory network that supports remembering. Our chapter focuses on two types of memory: episodic memory and semantic memory...
September 28, 2016: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
Sophie Rengarajan, Elissa A Hallem
Over one billion people worldwide are infected with parasitic nematodes. Many parasitic nematodes actively search for hosts to infect using volatile chemical cues, so understanding the olfactory signals that drive host seeking may elucidate new pathways for preventing infections. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model for parasitic nematodes: because sensory neuroanatomy is conserved across nematode species, an understanding of the microcircuits that mediate olfaction in C. elegans may inform studies of olfaction in parasitic nematodes...
September 23, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Arianna R Harrington, Mary T Silcox, Gabriel S Yapuncich, Doug M Boyer, Jonathan I Bloch
Well-preserved crania of notharctine adapiforms from the Eocene of North America provide the best direct evidence available for inferring neuroanatomy and encephalization in early euprimates (crown primates). Virtual endocasts of the notharctines Notharctus tenebrosus (n = 3) and Smilodectes gracilis (n = 4) from the middle Eocene Bridger formation of Wyoming, and the late Eocene European adapid adapiform Adapis parisiensis (n = 1), were reconstructed from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) data...
October 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
W James Greville, Simon Dymond, Philip M Newton
PURPOSE: Esoteric jargon and technical language are potential barriers to the teaching of science and medicine. Effective teaching strategies which address these barriers are desirable. Here, we created and evaluated the effectiveness of stand-alone 'equivalence-based instruction' (EBI) learning resources wherein the teaching of a small number of direct relationships between stimuli (e.g., anatomical regions, their function, and pathology) results in the learning of higher numbers of untaught relationships...
2016: Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
Chieh-En Jane Tseng, Seán Froudist-Walsh, Philip J Brittain, Vyacheslav Karolis, Chiara Caldinelli, Jasmin Kroll, Serena J Counsell, Steven C R Williams, Robin M Murray, Chiara Nosarti
Very preterm (<32 weeks of gestation) birth is associated with structural brain alterations and memory impairments throughout childhood and adolescence. Here, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to study the neuroanatomy of recognition memory in 49 very preterm-born adults and 50 controls (mean age: 30 years) during completion of a task involving visual encoding and recognition of abstract pictures. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted images were also collected. Bilateral hippocampal volumes were calculated and tractography of the fornix and cingulum was performed and assessed in terms of volume and hindrance modulated orientational anisotropy (HMOA)...
September 20, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
C K Barha, L S Nagamatsu, T Liu-Ambrose
This chapter presents an overview of the anatomy and functioning of the central nervous system. We begin the discussion by first examining the cellular basis of neural transmission. Then we present a brief description of the brain's white and gray matter and associated diseases, including a discussion of white-matter lesions. Finally, we place this information into context by discussing how the central nervous system integrates complex information to guide key functional systems, including the visual, auditory, chemosensory, somatic, limbic, motor, and autonomic systems...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
George Zacharopoulos, Paul H P Hanel, Thomas M Lancaster, Niklas Ihssen, Mark Drakesmith, Sonya Foley, Gregory R Maio, David E J Linden
Human values guide behaviour and the smooth functioning of societies. Schwartz's circumplex model of values predicts a sinusoidal waveform in relations between ratings of the importance of diverse human value types (e.g., achievement, benevolence) and any variables psychologically relevant to them. In this neuroimaging study, we examined these non-linear associations between values types and brain structure. In 85 participants, we found the predicted sinusoidal relationship between ratings of values types and two measures of white matter, volume and myelin volume fraction, as well as for grey matter parameters in several frontal regions...
September 16, 2016: Social Neuroscience
Laura Codorniú, Ariana Paulina Carabajal, Diego Pol, David Unwin, Oliver W M Rauhut
Pterosaurs are an extinct group of highly modified flying reptiles that thrived during the Mesozoic. This group has unique and remarkable skeletal adaptations to powered flight, including pneumatic bones and an elongate digit IV supporting a wing-membrane. Two major body plans have traditionally been recognized: the primitive, primarily long-tailed paraphyletic "rhamphorhynchoids" (preferably currently recognized as non-pterodactyloids) and the derived short-tailed pterodactyloids. These two groups differ considerably in their general anatomy and also exhibit a remarkably different neuroanatomy and inferred head posture, which has been linked to different lifestyles and behaviours and improved flying capabilities in these reptiles...
2016: PeerJ
Felicia W Sun, Michael R Stepanovic, Joseph Andreano, Lisa Feldman Barrett, Alexandra Touroutoglou, Bradford C Dickerson
UNLABELLED: Decline in cognitive skills, especially in memory, is often viewed as part of "normal" aging. Yet some individuals "age better" than others. Building on prior research showing that cortical thickness in one brain region, the anterior midcingulate cortex, is preserved in older adults with memory performance abilities equal to or better than those of people 20-30 years younger (i.e., "superagers"), we examined the structural integrity of two large-scale intrinsic brain networks in superaging: the default mode network, typically engaged during memory encoding and retrieval tasks, and the salience network, typically engaged during attention, motivation, and executive function tasks...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Jian-Kun Dai, Shu-Xia Wang, Dai Shan, Hai-Chen Niu, Hao Lei
Tree shrews are small mammals now commonly classified in the order of Scandentia, but have relatively closer affinity to primates than rodents. The species has a high brain-to-body mass ratio and relatively well-differentiated neocortex, and thus has been frequently used in neuroscience research, especially for studies on vision and neurological/psychiatric diseases. The available atlases on tree shrew brain provided only limited information on white matter (WM) anatomy. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to study the WM anatomy of tree shrew, with the goal to establish an image-based WM atlas...
September 13, 2016: Brain Structure & Function
Douglas A Grow, John R McCarrey, Christopher S Navara
The derivation of dopaminergic neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells brings new hope for a patient-specific, stem cell-based replacement therapy to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative diseases; and this novel cell-based approach has already proven effective in animal models. However, there are several aspects of this procedure that have yet to be optimized to the extent required for translation to an optimal cell-based transplantation protocol in humans. These challenges include pinpointing the optimal graft location, appropriately scaling up the graft volume, and minimizing the risk of chronic immune rejection, among others...
August 26, 2016: Stem Cell Research
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