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Anna Levkovsky, Sivan Abot-Barkan, Leah Chapnik, Omer Doron, Yuval Levy, Yuval Heled, Barak Gordon
INTRODUCTION: A loss of 1% or more of bodyweight due to dehydration has a negative effect on cognitive performance, which could critically affect flight safety. There is no mention in the literature concerning the amounts of military pilots' fluid loss during flight. The aim of this study was to quantify fluid loss of pilots during military flight. METHODS: There were 48 aviators (mean age 23.9) from the Israeli Air Force who participated in the study, which included 104 training flights in various flight platforms...
February 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Pawan Kapoor, Deepak Gaur
All facets of activity in the speciality of Aviation Medicine are essentially aimed at enhancing aerospace safety. This paper highlights some innovative changes brought about by Aerospace Medicine in the three major fields of the speciality namely, medical evaluation, aeromedical training and research. Based on lab and field studies, military aircrew are now permitted flying with Modifinil as 'Go' Pill and Zolpidem as 'No-Go' Pill during sustained operations. Several other drugs for disabilities like Hypertension and CAD are now permitted for aviators...
October 2017: Medical Journal, Armed Forces India
Matthew T Hall, Ryan P Austin, Tai A Do, Andrea McGlynn
Electronic cigarettes (EC) are an emerging form of nicotine replacement that has had a discernible increase in prevalence in the general population. Little is known regarding EC use among different military demographic groups or the extent of influence that social determinants of health may have on the behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of EC use in a select population of active duty U.S. Naval personnel. This study is unique in that it allows for EC behavior comparison between a traditionally healthy demographic (aviators, a subset of aircrew) and a representative general military population sample...
January 20, 2018: Military Medicine
Anthony P Tvaryanas, Converse Griffith
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to reuse available datasets to conduct an analysis of potential predictors of U.S. Air Force aircrew nonavailability in terms of being in "duties not to include flying" (DNIF) status. METHODS: This study was a retrospective cohort analysis of U.S. Air Force aircrew on active duty during the period from 2003-2012. Predictor variables included age, Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC), clinic location, diagnosis, gender, pay grade, and service component...
January 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Bart D Wilkison, Emily B Wong
Military pilots may be at greater risk for skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Military-specific studies are limited, but skin cancer rates in civilian pilots and aircrews have previously been examined. Risk factors for all pilots may include exposure to UV radiation (UVR) at higher altitudes, cosmic radiation, and electromagnetic energy from cockpit instruments, as well as altered sleep-wake cycles. The study of aviation-specific risk factors for skin cancer is relevant to all pilots and dermatologists who care for them...
October 2017: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
Kevin C Dietrich
BACKGROUND: Laser devices are ubiquitous in everyday operations. These devices pose a hazard to the eye and numerous injuries have been documented. However, there lies a misunderstanding in the propensity to damage aircrews' eyes during an exposure. Patient encounters and article review is presented in hopes to raise awareness that aircrew laser exposure at altitude, outside of critical phases of flight, is a distraction and not a threat. Also, to propose a change to Air Force policy regarding such exposures and further educating flight surgeons...
November 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Anthony S Wagstaff, Terje Larsen
BACKGROUND: The Swedish Air Force (SwAF) conducted a study in 2010 to harmonize portrayal of aeronautical info (AI) on SwAF charts with NATO standards. A mismatch was found concerning vertical obstructions (VO). Norway regarded Sweden's existing symbology as a way to solve the problem of overcrowded air charts and the two countries started to cooperate. The result of this development was a new set of symbology for obstacles. The aim of this study was to test the readability of the new obstacle and power line symbols compared to the old symbols...
November 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Thomas Syburra, Ed Nicol, Stuart Mitchell, Denis Bron, Ulrich Rosendahl, John Pepper
Aircrew are responsible for safe and reliable aircraft operations. Cardiovascular disease accounts for 50% of all pilot licences declined or withdrawn for medical reasons in Western Europe and is the most common cases of sudden incapacitation in flight. Aircrew retirement age is increasing (up to age 65) in a growing number of airlines and the burden of subclinical, but potentially significant, coronary atherosclerosis is unknown in qualified pilots above age 40. Safety considerations are paramount in aviation medicine, and the most dreaded cardiovascular complications are thromboembolic events and rhythm disturbances due to their potential for sudden incapacitation...
October 13, 2017: European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery
Tatsuhiko Sato, Aiko Nagamatsu, Haruka Ueno, Ryuho Kataoka, Shoko Miyake, Kazuo Takeda, Koji Niita
Estimation of cosmic-ray doses is of great importance not only in aircrew and astronaut dosimetry but also in evaluation of background radiation exposure to public. We therefore calculated the cosmic-ray doses on Earth, Moon and Mars as well as inside spacecraft, using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS. The same cosmic-ray models and dose conversion coefficients were employed in the calculation to properly compare between the simulation results for different environments. It is quantitatively confirmed that the thickness of physical shielding including the atmosphere and soil of the planets is the most important parameter to determine the cosmic-ray doses and their dominant contributors...
September 29, 2017: Radiation Protection Dosimetry
An-Lun Li, Wei-Fan Pan, Rong-Jiun Sheu
Galactic cosmic-ray-induced air showers constitute the largest source of radiation exposure for aircrew and passengers. To facilitate the evaluation of effective doses received by this population, a database containing dose rates of various radiation components in the atmosphere was established; the parameterization accounted for altitude, geomagnetic rigidity and solar modulation. Energy spectra of secondary cosmic rays and effective dose rates were calculated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. An auxiliary MATLAB program with a graphical user interface was developed to estimate the aviation route dose through interpolation and integration...
September 23, 2017: Radiation Protection Dosimetry
Daniel Wollschläger, Gaël Paul Hammer, Thomas Schafft, Steffen Dreger, Maria Blettner, Hajo Zeeb
Exposure to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin is an occupational risk factor in commercial aircrew. In a historic cohort of 26,774 German aircrew, radiation exposure was previously estimated only for cockpit crew using a job-exposure matrix (JEM). Here, a new method for retrospectively estimating cabin crew dose is developed. The German Federal Radiation Registry (SSR) documents individual monthly effective doses for all aircrew. SSR-provided doses on 12,941 aircrew from 2004 to 2015 were used to model cabin crew dose as a function of age, sex, job category, solar activity, and male pilots' dose; the mean annual effective dose was 2...
September 20, 2017: Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology
Anthony Schiemer
BACKGROUND: A syrinx is a fluid-filled cavity within the spinal cord. They can lead to a variety of symptoms, including limb weakness and back pain. Incidental finding of syringomyelia provides a challenge for clinicians due to the wide variety of possible symptoms. In military aviation, neurological findings in pilots can result in extensive investigation that can lead to potentially invasive management. Conversely, the potential for chronic progression of a spinal syrinx and subsequent neurological deterioration makes early identification critical...
October 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Jeremy Beer, Todd S Dart, Joseph Fischer, James Kisner
INTRODUCTION: A recent U-2 fatigue study, in which 10 subjects completed 2 simulated long-duration missions breathing either 100% oxygen or air in a hypobaric chamber, offered an opportunity to compare subjects' pulmonary function before and after remaining seated in a confined cockpit for 12 h. METHODS: In one U-2 mission configuration, the subject wore a full pressure suit and breathed aviator's breathing oxygen while chamber pressure was maintained at 4572 m (15,000 ft) above mean sea level...
October 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Philip D St John, Depeng Jiang, Robert B Tate
OBJECTIVE: To describe quality of life trajectories of older men over a 10-year time frame in mental and physical health domains, and to determine if these trajectories predict death over a subsequent 9-year period. METHOD: A cohort study of Royal Canadian Air Force aircrew veterans. We used Short Form-36 (SF-36) measures of mental and physical functioning collected prospectively at six time points between 1996 to 2006 (734 men with a mean age of 85.5 [ SD 3.0] years in 2006) to determine trajectories...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Aging and Health
Ellen Slungaard, Judith McLeod, Nicholas D C Green, Amit Kiran, Di J Newham, Stephen D R Harridge
INTRODUCTION: Exposure to sustained +Gz acceleration with inadequate G protection can result in G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) or almost loss of consciousness (A-LOC). The UK Royal Air Force (RAF) last conducted a survey of G-LOC within their military aircrew in 2005 with interventions subsequently introduced. The aim of this study was to repeat the 2005 survey in order to evaluate the impact of those interventions. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire requesting details of G-LOC and A-LOC events was mailed to all RAF pilots (N = 1878) and weapons systems operators (WSOs) (N = 473), irrespective of aircraft currently flown...
June 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
James Gentry, Juan Rango, Jianzhong Zhang, Shane Biedermann
BACKGROUND: Decompression sickness (DCS) is a potential danger and risk for both divers and aircrew alike. DCS is also a potential side effect of altitude (hypobaric) chamber training as well and can present long after training occurs. Literature review shows that altitude chamber induced DCS has approximately a 0.25% incidence. CASE REPORT: A 32-yr-old, active duty military member developed symptoms of DCS 3 h after his hypobaric chamber training. Unfortunately, he did not seek treatment for DCS until 48 h after the exposure...
April 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Shana A Huntsberger, William P Butler, Richard R Chapleau
BACKGROUND: The U.S. Air Force performs more than 6000 aeromedical transport flights annually, both internationally and domestically. Many of these flights include patients requiring pain relief medications. The risk of side effects from such medications administered at altitude is unknown, but understanding these risks is vital when selecting the safest pain management strategies to achieve optimal postflight outcomes. METHODS: Using an evidence-based medication side effect risk assessment model, we compared our patient-centric approach to an aircrew-centric approach using medications approved for use in U...
April 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Eric P Liggins, William P Serle
INTRODUCTION: Aircrew viewing eyepiece-injected symbology on color display night vision goggles (CDNVGs) are performing a visual task involving color under highly unnatural viewing conditions. Their performance in discriminating different colors and responding to color cues is unknown. METHODS: Experimental laboratory measurements of 1) color discrimination and 2) visual search performance are reported under adaptation conditions representative of a CDNVG. Color discrimination was measured using a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) paradigm that probes color space uniformly around a white point...
May 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
L P Zhou, H E Tian, L L Liu, L Ma, H Zhang, Q D Zhang, X Y Zhu, H B Zhu
Objective: To explore the relationship between occupational stress and physiological and biochemical indexes, to research the health effect of the occupational stress in aircrew. Methods: 450 aircrews were conducted with the OSI-R questionnaire survey, examine the level of blood pressure, blood routine, ALT and UA. Results: The concentration of HB was positively related with task conflict and entertainment and leisure (β=0.262 and 0.106, both P<0.05) , while heavy task, task discomfort and psychological stress reactions were negatively related with HB (β=-0...
February 20, 2017: Chinese Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases
Federica Pallavicini, Luca Argenton, Nicola Toniazzi, Luciana Aceti, Fabrizia Mantovani
INTRODUCTION: Stress Management Training programs are increasingly being adopted in the military field for resilience empowerment and primary stress prevention. In the last several years, advanced technologies (virtual reality in particular) have been integrated in order to develop more innovative and effective stress training programs for military personnel, including soldiers, pilots, and other aircrew professionals. This systematic review describes experimental studies that have been conducted in recent years to test the effectiveness of virtual reality-based Stress Management Training programs developed for military personnel...
December 1, 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
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