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R K MacKenzie, J Dowell, D Ayansina, J A Cleland
Traditional methods of assessing personality traits in medical school selection have been heavily criticised. To address this at the point of selection, "non-cognitive" tests were included in the UK Clinical Aptitude Test, the most widely-used aptitude test in UK medical education (UKCAT: ). We examined the predictive validity of these non-cognitive traits with performance during and on exit from medical school. We sampled all students graduating in 2013 from the 30 UKCAT consortium medical schools...
October 4, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
P Lambe, E Kay, D Bristow
AIM: In 2013 the UKCAT included a non-cognitive situational judgement test in addition to the four cognitive subtests commonly used by UK dental schools to select students. However, little is known about the situational judgement test's psychometric properties and relationship to other selection tools. This study's aim was explore these issues to inform decisions about the inclusion of the UKCAT SJT in the dental student selection process. METHOD: The sample comprised a cohort of applicants to a Bachelor of Dental Surgery programme, at a UK dental school, which does not use achievement in the UKCAT SJT in its selection process...
September 26, 2016: European Journal of Dental Education: Official Journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
Paul A Tiffin, Lazaro M Mwandigha, Lewis W Paton, H Hesselgreaves, John C McLachlan, Gabrielle M Finn, Adetayo S Kasim
BACKGROUND: The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) has been shown to have a modest but statistically significant ability to predict aspects of academic performance throughout medical school. Previously, this ability has been shown to be incremental to conventional measures of educational performance for the first year of medical school. This study evaluates whether this predictive ability extends throughout the whole of undergraduate medical study and explores the potential impact of using the test as a selection screening tool...
2016: BMC Medicine
Jonathan Mathers, Alice Sitch, Jayne Parry
CONTEXT: Medical schools are increasingly using novel tools to select applicants. The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) is one such tool and measures mental abilities, attitudes and professional behaviour conducive to being a doctor using constructs likely to be less affected by socio-demographic factors than traditional measures of potential. Universities are free to use UKCAT as they see fit but three broad modalities have been observed: 'borderline', 'factor' and 'threshold'. This paper aims to provide the first longitudinal analyses assessing the impact of the different uses of UKCAT on making offers to applicants with different socio-demographic characteristics...
October 2016: Medical Education
Filip Lievens, Fiona Patterson, Jan Corstjens, Stuart Martin, Sandra Nicholson
CONTEXT: Widening access promotes student diversity and the appropriate representation of all demographic groups. This study aims to examine diversity-related benefits of the use of situational judgement tests (SJTs) in the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) in terms of three demographic variables: (i) socio-economic status (SES); (ii) ethnicity, and (iii) gender. METHODS: Outcomes in medical and dental school applicant cohorts for the years 2012 (n = 15 581) and 2013 (n = 15 454) were studied...
June 2016: Medical Education
James P Blackmur, Nazir I Lone, Oliver D Stone, David J Webb, Neeraj Dhaun
The 2-hour long United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) is used by many universities in the United Kingdom as part of their selection process for undergraduate medical and dentistry degrees. We aimed to compare the performance of senior doctors in primary and secondary care and across a range of specialties, in a modified version of the medical school entrance examination-the mUKCAT. Lay people were also included in the study. Despite its widespread use, this is the first study that examines the performance of senior clinicians in the UKCAT...
May 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
R McAndrew, J Ellis, R A Valentine
: It is important for dental schools to select students who will complete their degree and progress on to become the dentists of the future. The process should be transparent, fair and ethical and utilise selection tools that select appropriate students. The interview is an integral part of UK dental schools student selection procedures. OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken in order to determine whether different interview methods (Cardiff with a multiple mini interview and Newcastle with a more traditional interview process) along with other components used in selection predicted academic performance in students...
February 22, 2016: European Journal of Dental Education: Official Journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
Adrian Husbands, Mark J Rodgerson, Jon Dowell, Fiona Patterson
BACKGROUND: While the construct of integrity has emerged as a front-runner amongst the desirable attributes to select for in medical school admissions, it is less clear how best to assess this characteristic. A potential solution lies in the use of Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) which have gained popularity due to robust psychometric evidence and potential for large-scale administration. This study aims to explore the psychometric properties of an SJT designed to measure the construct of integrity...
2015: BMC Medical Education
J I Foley, K Hijazi
AIM: To assess the association between admissions performance and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), and subsequent achievement within a graduate-entry dental school. METHOD: The study was conducted at the University of Aberdeen Dental School between 2010 and 2014. Student demographics, pre-admission scores (PAS), Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) tariffs, multiple mini-interview (MMI) grades, UKCAT scores and percentiles were correlated with academic performance reported as the University Common Assessment Scale (0-20)...
July 2015: British Dental Journal
Jane Adam, Miles Bore, Roy Childs, Jason Dunn, Jean Mckendree, Don Munro, David Powis
BACKGROUND: Over the past 70 years, there has been a recurring debate in the literature and in the popular press about how best to select medical students. This implies that we are still not getting it right: either some students are unsuited to medicine or the graduating doctors are considered unsatisfactory, or both. AIM: To determine whether particular variables at the point of selection might distinguish those more likely to become satisfactory professional doctors, by following a complete intake cohort of students throughout medical school and analysing all the data used for the students' selection, their performance on a range of other potential selection tests, academic and clinical assessments throughout their studies, and records of professional behaviour covering the entire five years of the course...
2015: Medical Teacher
Nana Sartania, John D McClure, Helen Sweeting, Allison Browitt
BACKGROUND: The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and its four subtests are currently used by 24 Medical and Dental Schools in the UK for admissions. This longitudinal study examines the predictive validity of UKCAT for final performance in the undergraduate medical degree programme at one Medical School and compares this with the predictive validity of the selection measures available pre-UKCAT. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study of one cohort of students, admitted to Glasgow Medical School in 2007...
2014: BMC Medical Education
Adrian Husbands, Alistair Mathieson, Jonathan Dowell, Jennifer Cleland, Rhoda MacKenzie
BACKGROUND: The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) was designed to address issues identified with traditional methods of selection. This study aims to examine the predictive validity of the UKCAT and compare this to traditional selection methods in the senior years of medical school. This was a follow-up study of two cohorts of students from two medical schools who had previously taken part in a study examining the predictive validity of the UKCAT in first year. METHODS: The sample consisted of 4th and 5th Year students who commenced their studies at the University of Aberdeen or University of Dundee medical schools in 2007...
2014: BMC Medical Education
R McAndrew, R Greatrix
The United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) has now been an active part of U.K. dental admissions for seven years with the test being used by 11 dental schools within their admissions processes. This paper gives an overview on UKCAT and highlights some of the on-going work in relation to its development. This paper also highlights what UKCAT is and some developments with respect to the UKCAT. It also facilitates the process of keeping dental practitioners informed.
February 2014: British Dental Journal
Paul A Tiffin, John C McLachlan, Lisa Webster, Sandra Nicholson
BACKGROUND: The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) was introduced to facilitate widening participation in medical and dental education in the UK by providing universities with a continuous variable to aid selection; one that might be less sensitive to the sociodemographic background of candidates compared to traditional measures of educational attainment. Initial research suggested that males, candidates from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds and those who attended independent or grammar schools performed better on the test...
2014: BMC Medical Education
Sam Leinster
Medical student selection is an important but difficult task. Three recent papers by McManus et al. in BMC Medicine have re-examined the role of tests of attainment of learning (A' levels, GCSEs, SQA) and of aptitude (AH5, UKCAT), but on a much larger scale than previously attempted. They conclude that A' levels are still the best predictor of future success at medical school and beyond. However, A' levels account for only 65% of the variance in performance that is found. Therefore, more work is needed to establish relevant assessment of the other 35%...
2013: BMC Medicine
I C McManus, Chris Dewberry, Sandra Nicholson, Jonathan S Dowell
BACKGROUND: Most UK medical schools use aptitude tests during student selection, but large-scale studies of predictive validity are rare. This study assesses the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), and its four sub-scales, along with measures of educational attainment, individual and contextual socio-economic background factors, as predictors of performance in the first year of medical school training. METHODS: A prospective study of 4,811 students in 12 UK medical schools taking the UKCAT from 2006 to 2008 as a part of the medical school application, for whom first year medical school examination results were available in 2008 to 2010...
2013: BMC Medicine
I C McManus, Chris Dewberry, Sandra Nicholson, Jonathan S Dowell, Katherine Woolf, Henry W W Potts
BACKGROUND: Measures used for medical student selection should predict future performance during training. A problem for any selection study is that predictor-outcome correlations are known only in those who have been selected, whereas selectors need to know how measures would predict in the entire pool of applicants. That problem of interpretation can be solved by calculating construct-level predictive validity, an estimate of true predictor-outcome correlation across the range of applicant abilities...
2013: BMC Medicine
Rizwana Lala, Duncan Wood, Sarah Baker
The United Kingdom's Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) aims to assess candidates' "natural talent" for dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the UKCAT for dental school applicant selection. The relationship of the UKCAT with demographic and academic variables was examined, assessing if the likelihood of being offered a place at a UK dental school was predicted by demographic factors and academic selection tools (predicted grades and existing school results). Finally, the validity of these selection tools in predicting first-year dental exam performance was assessed...
September 2013: Journal of Dental Education
Adrian Husbands, Jonathan Dowell
CONTEXT: The multiple mini-interview (MMI) is the primary admissions tool used to assess non-cognitive skills at Dundee Medical School. Although the MMI shows promise, more research is required to demonstrate its transferability and predictive validity, for instance, relative to other UK pre-admissions measures. METHODS: Applicants were selected for interview based on a combination of measures derived from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) form (academic achievement, medical experience, non-academic achievement and references) and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) in 2009 and 2010...
July 2013: Medical Education
Ben Kumwenda, Jon Dowell, Adrian Husbands
BACKGROUND: The assessment of non-academic achievements through the personal statement remains part of the selection process at most UK medical and dental schools. Such statement offers applicants an opportunity to highlight their non-academic achievements, but the highly competitive nature of the process may tempt them to exaggerate their accomplishments. The challenge is that selectors cannot discern applicants' exaggerated claims from genuine accounts and the system risks preferentially selecting dishonest applicants...
July 2013: Medical Teacher
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