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Assessment short-term memory

Elizabeth W Hagood, Tara L Gruenewald
OBJECTIVES: A considerable volume of experimental evidence demonstrates that exposure to aging stereotypes can strongly influence cognitive performance among older individuals. However, whether such effects extend to stereotypes regarding older adults' generative (i.e. contributory) worth is not yet known. The present investigation sought to evaluate the effect of exposure to positive versus negative generative value primes on an important aspect of later life functioning, memory. METHOD: Participants of age 55 and older (n = 51) were randomly assigned to read a mock news article portraying older individuals as either an asset (positive prime) or a burden (negative prime) to society...
October 26, 2016: Aging & Mental Health
Soren Impey, Timothy Jopson, Carl Pelz, Amanuel Tafessu, Fatema Fareh, Damian Zuloaga, Tessa Marzulla, Lara-Kirstie Riparip, Blair Stewart, Susanna Rosi, Mitchell S Turker, Jacob Raber
BACKGROUND: Astronauts are exposed to (56)Fe ions that may pose a significant health hazard during and following prolonged missions in deep space. We showed previously that object recognition requiring the hippocampus, a structure critical for cognitive function, is affected in 2-month-old mice irradiated with (56)Fe ions. Here we examined object recognition in 6-month-old mice irradiated with (56)Fe ions, a biological age more relevant to the typical ages of astronauts. Moreover, because the mechanisms mediating the detrimental effects of (56)Fe ions on hippocampal function are unclear, we examined changes in hippocampal networks involved in synaptic plasticity and memory, gene expression, and epigenetic changes in cytosine methylation (5mC) and hydroxymethylation (5hmC) that could accompany changes in gene expression...
October 24, 2016: BMC Genomics
Fatemeh Ostadan, Carla Centeno, Jean-Felix Daloze, Mira Jesper Frenn Lundbye-Jensen, Marc Roig
A single bout of cardiovascular exercise performed immediately after practicing a motor task improves the long-term retention of the skill through an optimization of memory consolidation. However, the specific brain mechanisms underlying the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on procedural memory are poorly understood. We sought to determine if a single bout of exercise modifies corticospinal excitability (CSE) during the early stages of memory consolidation. In addition, we investigated if changes in CSE are associated with exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory...
October 20, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Yuda Turana
Observational studies have conveyed the connection between hypertension and cognitive impairment. Several forms of dementia are more frequent in hypertensive subjects or those with previous history of hypertension compared to subjects with normal blood pressure.In many studies, hypertension occuring in mid-life is a risk factor of dementia occuring in later age. Long-standing hypertension will induce structural damages in the brain. It is also widely known that hypertension attributes to small vessel diseases causing lacunar infarcts and white matter lesions associated with cognitive decline...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Harini C Krishnan, Catherine E Gandour, Joshua L Ramos, Mariah C Wrinkle, Joseph J Sanchez-Pacheco, Lisa C Lyons
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Insufficient sleep in individuals appears increasingly common due to the demands of modern work schedules and technology use. Consequently, there is a growing need to understand the interactions between sleep deprivation and memory. The current study determined the effects of acute sleep deprivation on short- and long-term associative memory using the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, a relatively simple model system well known for studies of learning and memory. DESIGN: Aplysia were sleep deprived for 9 h using context changes and tactile stimulation prior to or after training using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible (LFI)...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Jeffrey Livezey, Thomas Oliver, Louis Cantilena
A 32-year-old male developed neuropsychiatric symptoms 2 weeks after starting mefloquine 250 mg/week for malaria prophylaxis. He continued to take the medication for the next 4 months. Initial symptoms included vivid dreams and anxiety, as well as balance problems. These symptoms persisted and progressed over the next 4 years to include vertigo, emotional lability, and poor short-term memory, which have greatly affected his personal and professional life. An extensive evaluation revealed objective evidence supporting a central vestibulopathy...
December 2016: Drug Saf Case Rep
D Hernández-Bonilla, C Escamilla-Núñez, D Mergler, S Rodríguez-Dozal, M Cortez-Lugo, S Montes, L A Tristán-López, M Catalán-Vázquez, A Schilmann, Horacio Riojas-Rodriguez
BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal involved in multiple physiological functions. Environmental exposure to airborne Mn is associated with neurocognitive deficits in humans. Children, whose nervous system is in development, are particularly susceptible to Mn neurotoxicity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the association between Mn environmental exposure, and effects on visuoperception and visual memory in schoolchildren. METHODS: We assessed schoolchildren between 7 and 11 years old, with similar socioeconomic status, from the mining district of Molango (n=148) and Agua Blanca (n=119, non-mining area) in Hidalgo state, Mexico...
October 11, 2016: Neurotoxicology
Markus Sack, Jenny N Lenz, Mira Jakovcevski, Sarah V Biedermann, Claudia Falfán-Melgoza, Jan Deussing, Maximilian Bielohuby, Martin Bidlingmaier, Frederik Pfister, Günter K Stalla, Alexander Sartorius, Peter Gass, Wolfgang Weber-Fahr, Johannes Fuss, Matthias K Auer
Excessive intake of high-caloric diets as well as subsequent development of obesity and diabetes mellitus may exert a wide range of unfavorable effects on the central nervous system (CNS) in the long-term. The potentially harmful effects of such diets were suggested to be mitigated by physical exercise. Here, we conducted a study investigating early effects of a cafeteria-diet on gray and white brain matter volume by means of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Half of the mice performed voluntary wheel running to study if regular physical exercise prevents unfavorable effects of a cafeteria-diet...
October 12, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Jayne Newbury, Thomas Klee, Stephanie F Stokes, Catherine Moran
Purpose: This study explored associations between working memory and language in children aged 2-4 years. Method: Seventy-seven children aged 24-30 months were assessed on tests measuring language, visual cognition, verbal working memory (VWM), phonological short-term memory (PSTM), and processing speed. A standardized test of receptive and expressive language was used as the outcomes measure 18 months later. Results: There were moderate-to-strong longitudinal bivariate relationships between the 3 processing measures and language outcomes...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
Marta Nieto, Laura Ros, Gloria Medina, Jorge J Ricarte, José M Latorre
Over the last two decades, there has been a growing interest in the study of the development of executive functions (EF) in preschool children due to their relationship with different cognitive, psychological, social and academic domains. Early detection of individual differences in executive functioning can have major implications for basic and applied research. Consequently, there is a key need for assessment tools adapted to preschool skills: Shape School has been shown to be a suitable task for this purpose...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Lindsey Edwards, Lynne Aitkenhead, Dawn Langdon
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to establish the relationship between short-term memory capacity and reading skills in adolescents with cochlear implants. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A between-groups design compared a group of young people with cochlear implants with a group of hearing peers on measures of reading, and auditory and visual short-term memory capacity. The groups were matched for non-verbal IQ and age. The adolescents with cochlear implants were recruited from the Cochlear Implant Programme at a specialist children's hospital...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Tonatiuh Pena Centeno, Orr Shomroni, Magali Hennion, Rashi Halder, Ramon Vidal, Raza-Ur Rahman, Stefan Bonn
Recent evidence suggests that the formation and maintenance of memory requires epigenetic changes. In an effort to understand the spatio-temporal extent of learning and memory-related epigenetic changes we have charted genome-wide histone and DNA methylation profiles, in two different brain regions, two cell types, and three time-points, before and after learning. In this data descriptor we provide detailed information on data generation, give insights into the rationale of experiments, highlight necessary steps to assess data quality, offer guidelines for future use of the data and supply ready-to-use code to replicate the analysis results...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Data
Xia Deng, Chun-Yan Tang, Jie Zhang, Lei Zhu, Zun-Chun Xie, Hong-Han Gong, Xiang-Zuo Xiao, Ren-Shi Xu
The cortical thickness has gained an extensive attention as a pathological alteration of sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD), the alteration of pathological cortical thickness may distinctly contribute to the consistent clinical manifestations. Therefore, we investigated the cortical thickness correlates of clinical manifestations in the mid-stage sPD from the Han population of Chinese mainland (HPCM). A sample of 67 mid-stage sPD patients and 35 matched controls from HPCM were performed a corticometry of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the assessment of clinical manifestations including the demographic and disease-related characteristics, and underwent the final analysis of the cortical thickness correlates with the clinical manifestations...
October 28, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Christian H Poth, Werner X Schneider
Human vision is organized in discrete processing episodes (e.g., eye fixations or task-steps). Object information must be transmitted across episodes to enable episodic short-term recognition: recognizing whether a current object has been seen in a previous episode. We ask whether episodic short-term recognition presupposes that objects have been encoded into capacity-limited visual working memory (VWM), which retains visual information for report. Alternatively, it could rely on the activation of visual features or categories that occurs before encoding into VWM...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Somayyeh Mokhber, Paria Zargham Ravanbakhsh, Fatemeh Jesmi, Mohadeseh Pishgahroudsari, Atefeh Ghanbari Jolfaei, Abdolreza Pazouki
BACKGROUND: Obesity, particularly morbid obesity, has various physical and mental complications. Excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) is a sleep disorder that reduces individuals' performance capability and the accuracy of their short-term memory and causes learning problems. This retrospective study aimed to document the presence of EDS in a sample of obese patients in comparison to patients with a normal weight. OBJECTIVES: This article compares the excessive daytime sleepiness of obese and non-obese patients in the minimally invasive surgery research center in Tehran, Iran...
July 2016: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal
Julia Neitzel, Marion Ortner, Marleen Haupt, Petra Redel, Timo Grimmer, Igor Yakushev, Alexander Drzezga, Peter Bublak, Christoph Preul, Christian Sorg, Kathrin Finke
Posterior cortical atrophy is dominated by progressive degradation of parieto-occipital grey and white matter, and represents in most cases a variant of Alzheimer's disease. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy are characterized by increasing higher visual and visuo-spatial impairments. In particular, a key symptom of posterior cortical atrophy is simultanagnosia i.e. the inability to perceive multiple visual objects at the same time. Two neuro-cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to underlie simultanagnosia, either reduced visual short-term memory capacity or decreased visual processing speed possibly resulting from white matter impairments over and above damage to cortical brain areas...
October 3, 2016: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Serguei V S Pakhomov, Wrenda Teeple, Anne M Mills, Michael Kotlyar
Mild-to-moderate impairment in frontally mediated functions such as sustained attention, working memory, and inhibition have been found to occur during tobacco withdrawal and may present a barrier to successful cessation. These findings have led to studies evaluating cessation treatments that target nicotine withdrawal related cognitive impairment. The instruments currently used to assess cognitive function provide detailed and specific information but have limitations including being time consuming, cumbersome, anxiety provoking, and having poor ecological validity...
October 2016: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Marie B Yuille, Cory K Olmstead, Ashleigh K Wells, Britta Hahn
RATIONALE: The beneficial effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists on cognitive performance have been widely shown. Paradoxically, recent preclinical studies employing extremely low doses of nAChR antagonists have also found cognitive enhancement, perhaps pointing to a novel treatment mechanism for cognitive deficits. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to test whether low doses of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine would benefit performance in human volunteers...
September 27, 2016: Psychopharmacology
Kristen M Beavers, Iris Leng, Stephen R Rapp, Michael E Miller, Denise K Houston, Anthony P Marsh, Don G Hire, Laura D Baker, George A Bray, George L Blackburn, Andrea L Hergenroeder, John M Jakicic, Karen C Johnson, Mary T Korytkowski, Brent Van Dorsten, Stephen B Kritchevsky
OBJECTIVES: To test whether average long-term glucose exposure is associated with cognitive and physical function in middle-aged and younger-old adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Data obtained as part of the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial (NCT00017953) and Look AHEAD Movement and Memory ancillary study (NCT01410097). PARTICIPANTS: Overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged 45 to 76 at baseline (N = 879)...
September 27, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Francesco Franza
BD-II has been consistently associated with cognitive dysfunction across a broad range of cognitive domains. Atypical antipsychotic drugs, or SGAs are effective antipsychotics in these diseases, often in combination with antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Data on the possible effect of antipsychotics on neuro-cognition are rare and conflicting. The main objective of our study was to assess the effectiveness and possible risks to cognitive function in a group of inpatients affected by BD-II. Forty-five inpatients with Bipolar II Disorder (DSM-5) were included in a two-year observational study...
September 2016: Psychiatria Danubina
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