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relapse malaria

Nicholas J White
Relapse may have evolved in malaria as a mechanism to avoid suppression by more virulent species in mixed infections, thereby increasing transmission opportunities. Later evolution of long latency in Plasmodium vivax was a necessary adaptation as early hominins moved to colder areas with shorter mosquito breeding seasons. Genetic diversity was maintained through heterologous hypnozoite activation.
October 12, 2016: Trends in Parasitology
Gabriele Franken, Marita Bruijns-Pötschke, Joachim Richter, Heinz Mehlhorn, Alfons Labisch
For a long time, only two phases of the life cycle of the agents of malaria parasites were known: the cycle inside the mosquito body and the cycle in the red blood cells of humans as intermediate hosts. A possible tissue development cycle inside humans, however, had already been proposed before 1900. In general, Pieter Klaesz Pel is considered the first scientist who has described such a tissue cycle. However, a closer look at Pel's work shows that he still followed an old (conservative) way of thinking, since he still referred to "malaria poison and malaria miasma...
October 7, 2016: Parasitology Research
Andre M Siqueira, Oscar Mesones-Lapouble, Paola Marchesini, Vanderson de Souza Sampaio, Patricia Brasil, Pedro L Tauil, Cor Jesus Fontes, Fabio T M Costa, Claudio T Daniel-Ribeiro, Marcus V G Lacerda, Camila P Damasceno, Ana Carolina S Santelli
Brazil is the largest country in Latin America. Furthermore, a considerable portion of its territory is located within the Amazon region in the north. As a result, Brazil has reported half of the total malaria cases in the Americas in the last four decades. Recent progress in malaria control has been accompanied by an increasing proportion of Plasmodium vivax, underscoring a need for a better understanding of management and control of this species and associated challenges. Among these challenges, the contribution of vivax malaria relapses, earlier production of gametocytes (compared with Plasmodium falciparum), inexistent methods to diagnose hypnozoite carriers, and decreasing efficacy of available antimalarials need to be addressed...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Toby Leslie, Sami Nahzat, Walid Sediqi
Around half of the population of Afghanistan resides in areas at risk of malaria transmission. Two species of malaria (Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum) account for a high burden of disease-in 2011, there were more than 300,000 confirmed cases. Around 80-95% of malaria is P. vivax Transmission is seasonal and focal, below 2,000 m in altitude, and in irrigated areas which allow breeding of anopheline mosquito vectors. Malaria risk is stratified to improve targeting of interventions. Sixty-three of 400 districts account for ∼85% of cases, and are the target of more intense control efforts...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Anupkumar R Anvikar, Naman Shah, Akshay C Dhariwal, Gagan Singh Sonal, Madan Mohan Pradhan, Susanta K Ghosh, Neena Valecha
Historically, malaria in India was predominantly caused by Plasmodium vivax, accounting for 53% of the estimated cases. After the spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in the 1990s, the prevalence of the two species remained equivalent at the national level for a decade. By 2014, the proportion of P. vivax has decreased to 34% nationally, but with high regional variation. In 2014, P. vivax accounted for around 380,000 malaria cases in India; almost a sixth of all P. vivax cases reported globally. Plasmodium vivax has remained resistant to control measures, particularly in urban areas...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Claudia Surjadjaja, Asik Surya, J Kevin Baird
Endemic malaria occurs across much of the vast Indonesian archipelago. All five species of Plasmodium known to naturally infect humans occur here, along with 20 species of Anopheles mosquitoes confirmed as carriers of malaria. Two species of plasmodia cause the overwhelming majority and virtually equal shares of malaria infections in Indonesia: Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax The challenge posed by P. vivax is especially steep in Indonesia because chloroquine-resistant strains predominate, along with Chesson-like strains that relapse quickly and multiple times at short intervals in almost all patients...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Yossef Alnasser, Cusi Ferradas, Taryn Clark, Maritza Calderon, Alejandro Gurbillon, Dionicia Gamboa, Uri S McKakpo, Isabella A Quakyi, Kwabena M Bosompem, David J Sullivan, Joseph M Vinetz, Robert H Gilman
Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent cause of human malaria in the world and can lead to severe disease with high potential for relapse. Its genetic and geographic diversities make it challenging to control. P. vivax is understudied and to achieve control of malaria in endemic areas, a rapid, accurate, and simple diagnostic tool is necessary. In this pilot study, we found that a colorimetric system using AuNPs and MSP10 DNA detection in urine can provide fast, easy, and inexpensive identification of P. vivax...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Justin A Green, Khadeeja Mohamed, Navin Goyal, Samia Bouhired, Azra Hussaini, Siôn W Jones, Gavin C K W Koh, Ivan Kostov, Maxine Taylor, Allen Wolstenholm, Stephan Duparc
Tafenoquine is in development as a single-dose treatment for relapse prevention in Plasmodium vivax malaria. Tafenoquine must be co-administered with a blood schizonticide; either chloroquine or artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This open-label, randomized, parallel-group study evaluated potential drug interactions between tafenoquine and two ACTs: dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine or artemether-lumefantrine. Healthy volunteers of either sex, aged 18-65 years, without glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, were randomized into five cohorts (n=24 per cohort) to receive tafenoquine on day 1 (300 mg) plus: once daily dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine on days 1, 2 and 3 (120:960 mg for 36-<75 kg bodyweight; 160:1280 mg for ≥75-100 kg bodyweight); or artemether-lumefantrine (80:480 mg) two doses 8 h apart on day 1, then twice daily on days 2 and 3; or each drug given alone...
October 3, 2016: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Anju Verma, Hema Joshi, Vineeta Singh, Anup Anvikar, Neena Valecha
BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax is the most widely distributed human malaria parasite and accounts for approximately the same number of malaria cases as Plasmodium falciparum in India. Compared with P. falciparum, P. vivax is difficult to eradicate because of its tendency to cause relapses, which impacts treatment and control strategies. The genetic diversity of these parasites, particularly of the merozoite surface protein-3 alpha (msp-3α) gene, can be used to help develop a potential vaccine...
2016: Malaria Journal
Marcelo Augusto Mota Brito, Henry Maia Peixoto, Anne Cristine Gomes de Almeida, Maria Regina Fernandes de Oliveira, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra Romero, José Pereira Moura-Neto, Nakul Singh, Wuelton Marcelo Monteiro, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de Lacerda
INTRODUCTION: In the Brazilian Amazon, malaria infections are primarily caused by Plasmodium vivax. The only drug that kills the hypnozoite form of P. vivax is primaquine, thereby preventing relapse. However, treating glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals with primaquine can lead to severe hemolysis. G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) affects approximately 400 million people worldwide, most of whom live in malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, clinicians need tools that can easily and reliably identify individuals with G6PDd...
July 2016: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical
Chester Joyner, Alberto Moreno, Esmeralda V S Meyer, Monica Cabrera-Mora, Jessica C Kissinger, John W Barnwell, Mary R Galinski
BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax infections in humans or in new world monkeys pose research challenges that necessitate the use of alternative model systems. Plasmodium cynomolgi is a closely related species that shares genetic and biological characteristics with P. vivax, including relapses. Here, the haematological dynamics and clinical presentation of sporozoite-initiated P. cynomolgi infections in Macaca mulatta (rhesus macaques) are evaluated over a 100-day period. METHODS: Five M...
2016: Malaria Journal
Jacob E Lemieux, Alice D Tran, Lisa Freimark, Stephen F Schaffner, Heidi Goethert, Kristian G Andersen, Suzane Bazner, Amy Li, Graham McGrath, Lynne Sloan, Edouard Vannier, Dan Milner, Bobbi Pritt, Eric Rosenberg, Sam Telford, Jeffrey A Bailey, Pardis C Sabeti
Human babesiosis caused by Babesia microti is an emerging tick-borne zoonosis of increasing importance due to its rising incidence and expanding geographic range(1). Infection with this organism, an intraerythrocytic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, causes a febrile syndrome similar to malaria(2). Relapsing disease is common among immunocompromised and asplenic individuals(3,4) and drug resistance has recently been reported(5). To investigate the origin and genetic diversity of this parasite, we sequenced the complete genomes of 42 B...
2016: Nature Microbiology
Mamadou A Diallo, Aida S Badiane, Khadim Diongue, Awa Deme, Naomi W Lucchi, Marie Gaye, Tolla Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Ndiaye, Louise K Sene, Abdoulaye Diop, Amy Gaye, Yaye D Ndiaye, Diama Samb, Mamadou S Yade, Omar Ndir, Venkatachalam Udhayakumar, Daouda Ndiaye
BACKGROUND: Plasmodium ovale is rarely described in Senegal. A case of clinical malaria due to P. ovale wallikeri in West Central of Senegal is reported. CASE: A 34-year-old male baker in Dakar, with no significant previous medical history, was admitted to a health clinic with fever and vomiting. Fever had been lasting for 4 days with peaks every 48 h. As monospecific Plasmodium falciparum HRP-2 RDT was negative, he was treated with antibiotics. However, owing to persisting symptoms, he was referred to the emergency unit of the Youssou Mbargane Diop Hospital, Dakar, Senegal...
2016: Malaria Journal
Cindy S Chu, Nicholas J White
INTRODUCTION: Relapses are important contributors to illness and morbidity in Plasmodium vivax and P. ovale infections. Relapse prevention (radical cure) with primaquine is required for optimal management, control and ultimately elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria. A review was conducted with publications in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish using the search terms 'P. vivax' and 'relapse'. AREAS COVERED: Hypnozoites causing relapses may be activated weeks or months after initial infection...
October 2016: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Yehenew A Ebstie, Solomon M Abay, Wondmagegn T Tadesse, Dawit A Ejigu
Despite declining global malaria incidence, the disease continues to be a threat to people living in endemic regions. In 2015, an estimated 214 million new malaria cases and 438,000 deaths due to malaria were recorded. Plasmodium vivax is the second most common cause of malaria next to Plasmodium falciparum. Vivax malaria is prevalent especially in Southeast Asia and the Horn of Africa, with enormous challenges in controlling the disease. Some of the challenges faced by vivax malaria-endemic countries include limited access to effective drugs treating liver stages of the parasite (schizonts and hypnozoites), emergence/spread of drug resistance, and misperception of vivax malaria as nonlethal...
2016: Drug Design, Development and Therapy
Anou Dreyfus, Jonathan W Dyal, Raewynne Pearson, Clovice Kankya, Charles Kajura, Lordrick Alinaitwe, Steven Kakooza, Katharine M Pelican, Dominic A Travis, Michael Mahero, David R Boulware, Lawrence Mugisha
BACKGROUND: The burden of human leptospirosis in Uganda is unknown. We estimated the seroprevalence of Leptospira antibodies, probable acute/recent leptospirosis, and risk factors for seropositivity in humans in rural Western Uganda. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 359 non-pregnant adults visiting the Kikuube and Kigorobya Health Centers were sequentially recruited during March and April 2014. A health history survey and serum were collected from consented participants...
August 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Ankur Sharma, Solomon Conteh, Jean Langhorne, Patrick E Duffy
Pregnancy malaria (PM) is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups...
2016: PloS One
Jessica C Kissinger
Two new studies confirm that Plasmodium vivax populations are more diverse than Plasmodium falciparum and identify signs of recent selection at many loci, including those for drug resistance. P. vivax shows a trend of regional adaptations that poses challenges to global efforts to control and eliminate this major cause of relapsing malaria.
July 27, 2016: Nature Genetics
Sedigheh Zakeri, Lotus Leonie van den Hoogen, Akram Abouie Mehrizi, Fatemh Karimi, Ahmad Raeisi, Chris Drakeley
BACKGROUND: Iran has achieved a substantial decline in malaria incidence over the past decades. A common feature of malaria-endemic settings is the requirement for more sensitive techniques to describe levels of low transmission. In this study, serological and parasitological methods were used to measure transmission levels of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax during an elimination programme (2012) in Chabahar District, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, south-eastern Iran. METHODS: Participants were randomly selected from 64 different geographical clusters in Chabahar city and surrounding villages...
2016: Malaria Journal
M Seilmaier, W Guggemos, A Wieser, V Fingerle, L Balzer, T Fenzl, M Hoch, U von Both, H U Schmidt, C M Wendtner, E Strobel
Background | Relapsing fever is divided into tick borne relapsing fever (TBRF) and louse borne relapsing fever (LBRF). This report describes 25 refugees from East Africa who were diagnosed to suffer from LBRF within a period of 6 month only at a single hospital in Munich / Germany. Material & Methods | The aim was to point out common clinical features as well as laboratory findings and clinical symptoms before and after initiation of treatment in 25 patients with louse borne relapsing fever (LBRF) who were diagnosed and treated at Klinikum München Schwabing from August 2015 to January 2016...
July 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
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