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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503539/differences-in-pes-planus-and-pes-cavus-subtalar-eversion-inversion-before-and-after-prolonged-running-using-a-two-dimensional-digital-analysis
#1
Charlotte Sinclair, Ulla Svantesson, Rita Sjöström, Marie Alricsson
In sports, there is a constant discussion about the hyper-pronation and supination of the foot during loading and its relation to injuries or discomfort. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible differences in the subtalar joint in the midstance phase of running, between individuals with Pes Planus and Pes Cavus, after 5 min and 45 min of running. Thirty-four subjects, meeting the requirements for Pes Planus (30 feet) and Pes Cavus (35 feet), according to the criteria for Medial Longitudinal Arch-angle, were included in the study...
April 2017: Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473871/lateral-wedges-with-and-without-custom-arch-support-for-people-with-medial-knee-osteoarthritis-and-pronated-feet-an-exploratory-randomized-crossover-study
#2
Michael A Hunt, Judit Takacs, Natasha M Krowchuk, Gillian L Hatfield, Rana S Hinman, Ryan Chang
BACKGROUND: Pronated foot posture is associated with many clinical and biomechanical outcomes unique to medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). Though shoe-worn insole treatment, including lateral wedges, is commonly studied in this patient population, their effects on the specific subgroup of people with medial knee OA and concomitant pronated feet are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lateral wedge insoles with custom arch support are more beneficial than lateral wedge insoles alone for knee and foot symptoms in people with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis (OA) and pronated feet...
2017: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446388/medial-shoe-ground-pressure-and-specific-running-injuries-a-1-year-prospective-cohort-study
#3
René B K Brund, Sten Rasmussen, Rasmus O Nielsen, Uwe G Kersting, Uffe Laessoe, Michael Voigt
OBJECTIVES: Achilles tendinitis, plantar fasciopathy and medial tibial stress syndrome injuries (APM-injuries) account for approximately 25% of the total number of running injuries amongst recreational runners. Reports on the association between static foot pronation and APM-injuries are contradictory. Possibly, dynamic measures of pronation may display a stronger relationship with the risk of APM-injuries. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate if running distance until the first APM-injury was dependent on the foot balance during stance phase in recreational male runners...
April 15, 2017: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394675/influence-of-age-sex-and-anthropometric-determinants-on-the-foot-posture-index-in-a-pediatric-population
#4
Ana María Jimenez-Cebrian, María Francisca Morente-Bernal, Pedro Daniel Román-Bravo, Juan Francisco Saucedo-Badía, Juan Antonio Alonso-Ríos, Alonso Montiel-Luque
BACKGROUND: The Foot Posture Index (FPI) is a clinical tool for diagnosis that aims to quantify the grade of a foot position as neutral, pronated, or supinated. Its purpose is to develop a simple six-factor method for rating foot posture with an easy and quantitative result. We evaluated possible differences in the FPI by sex and the influences of age, weight, height, foot size, and body mass index (BMI) on foot posture. METHODS: In 150 asymptomatic children (79 boys and 71 girls) aged 8 to 13 years, we determined weight, height, BMI, and FPI in the bipedal, static, and relaxed position...
March 2017: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390293/comparison-of-foot-muscle-morphology-and-foot-kinematics-between-recreational-runners-with-normal-feet-and-with-asymptomatic-over-pronated-feet
#5
Xianyi Zhang, Jeroen Aeles, Benedicte Vanwanseele
Over-pronated feet are common in adults and are associated with lower limb injuries. Studying the foot muscle morphology and foot kinematic patterns is important for understanding the mechanism of over-pronation related injuries. The aim of this study is to compare the foot muscle morphology and foot inter-segmental kinematics between recreational runners with normal feet and those with asymptomatic over-pronated feet. A total of 26 recreational runners (17 had normal feet and 9 had over-pronated feet) participated in this study and their foot type was assessed using the 6-item Foot Posture Index...
March 31, 2017: Gait & Posture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259028/influence-of-foot-posture-on-the-functioning-of-the-windlass-mechanism
#6
Rachel Lucas, Mark Cornwall
The absence of a functioning windlass mechanism may delay re-supination of the foot during locomotion and put excess stress on the mid-tarsal joint and soft tissues of the foot. The purpose of this study was to describe the foot posture of individuals that have an impaired or absent windlass mechanism. Forty-seven individuals (34 females and 13 males) with a mean age of 26 years were recruited to participate in this study. The Foot Posture Index was used to visually assess the posture of both feet. In addition, a digital gauge was used to measure dorsal arch height and midfoot width in bilateral resting standing...
January 17, 2017: Foot
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182859/radiographic-study-of-pes-planovarus
#7
Janic Aebi, Monika Horisberger, Arno Frigg
BACKGROUND: Depending on the direction of the subtalar joint, a foot deformity generally tends towards pronation (pes planovalgus) or supination (pes cavovarus). However, the combination of hindfoot varus and flat midfoot/forefoot (pes planovarus) is an exception to this rule. Pes planovarus has so far only been referred to in connection with Müller-Weiss disease and congenital disease. We diagnosed pes planovarus in otherwise healthy patients without these diseases. METHODS: Forty patients with 54 symptomatic feet who were treated between August 2012 and July 2016 were included (mean age, 44...
May 2017: Foot & Ankle International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28027667/do-structural-changes-of-the-foot-influence-plantar-pressure-patterns-during-various-stages-of-pregnancy-and-postpartum
#8
Preetha Ramachandra, Pratap Kumar, Asha Kamath, Arun G Maiya
BACKGROUND: The foot of a pregnant woman undergoes morphological changes with the advancement of pregnancy. It is important to understand the structural changes of the foot during pregnancy and postpartum because any such change may alter the plantar pressure pattern and the entire foot biomechanics. METHOD: Primigravidae with a gestational age of 12 weeks or less, aged between 18 and 35 years were included in the study. They were prospectively studied across 5 time periods during pregnancy and postpartum...
December 1, 2016: Foot & Ankle Specialist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27992254/an-investigation-of-structure-flexibility-and-function-variables-that-discriminate-asymptomatic-foot-types
#9
Sarah P Shultz, Jinsup Song, Andrew P Kraszewski, Jocelyn F Hafer, Smita Rao, Sherry Backus, Rajshree Mootanah, Howard J Hillstrom
It has been suggested that foot type consider not only foot structure (high, normal, low arch), but also function (over-pronation, normal, over-supination) and flexibility (reduced, normal, excessive). Therefore, this study used canonical regression analyses to assess which variables of foot structure, function, and flexibility can accurately discriminate between clinical foot type classifications. The feet of 61 asymptomatic, healthy adults (18-77 years) were classified as cavus (N=24), rectus (N=54), or planus (N=44) using standard clinical measures...
December 19, 2016: Journal of Applied Biomechanics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887922/obesity-foot-pain-and-foot-disorders-in-older-men-and-women
#10
Alyssa B Dufour, Elena Losina, Hylton B Menz, Michael P LaValley, Marian T Hannan
OBJECTIVE: We investigated obesity, foot pain and selected foot disorders, and determined if associations differed by foot posture or dynamic foot function. METHODS: We included 2445 men and women (4888 feet) from the Framingham Foot Study (2002-2008). A foot examination assessed presence of disorders and pain on each foot. Body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) was categorized as normal (<25), overweight (25-29.99), moderate-obesity (30-34.99) severe-obesity (35+). Foot posture (normal, cavus, planus) and dynamic foot function (normal, supinated, pronated) were defined using plantar pressure measurement system...
November 22, 2016: Obesity Research & Clinical Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27736722/the-use-of-a-static-measure-to-predict-foot-posture-at-midstance-during-walking
#11
Thomas G McPoil, Jessica Ford, Joel Fundaun, Chelsea Gallegos, Andrew Kinney, Peter McMillan, Jessica Murphy, Elliot Sky, Derrick Torba, Michael Bade
Previous studies have successfully used the longitudinal arch angle (LAA) to assess foot posture, but the measurement consistency and ability of the LAA to predict dynamic foot posture during activity in a variety of foot types have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the LAA as well as if the clinical method of assessing the LAA could be used to predict the LAA at midstance during walking for supinated, normal, and pronated foot types. The Arch Height Ratio was used to select 35 participants with 12 supinated, 46 normal, and 12 pronated feet...
August 2016: Foot
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27721087/selective-activation-of-lower-leg-muscles-during-maximum-voluntary-isometric-contractions
#12
Marco Hagen, Gerrit Schwiertz, Karl B Landorf, Hylton B Menz, George S Murley
The pronators and supinators play a key role in the medio-lateral stability of the ankle joint complex (i.e. talo-crural and subtalar joints). We hypothesized that each shank muscle has a specific activation pattern determined by its anatomical course around the axes of the subtalar and talo-crural joints. A secondary objective was to examine the effect of foot posture on these activation patterns. Forty-nine young adults (25 normal-arched feet, 24 flat-arched feet) performed maximum voluntary isometric contractions against manual resistance in four movement directions: plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), pronation (PRO) and supination (SUP)...
December 2016: Human Movement Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27672062/biomechanical-analysis-of-stability-of-posterior-antiglide-plating-in-osteoporotic-pronation-abduction-ankle-fracture-model-with-posterior-tibial-fragment
#13
Kathleen Hartwich, Alejandro Lorente Gomez, Jaroslaw Pyrc, Radosław Gut, Stefan Rammelt, René Grass
BACKGROUND: We performed a biomechanical comparison of 2 methods for operative stabilization of pronation-abduction stage III ankle fractures; group 1: Anterior-posterior lag screws fixing the posterior tibial fragment and lateral fibula plating (LSLFP) versus group 2: locked plate fixation of the posterior tibial fragment and posterior antiglide plate fixation of the fibula (LPFP). METHODS: Seven pairs of fresh-frozen osteoligamentous lower leg specimens (2 male, and 5 female donors) were used for the biomechanical testing...
January 2017: Foot & Ankle International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27541338/foot-alignments-influence-the-effect-of-knee-adduction-moment-with-lateral-wedge-insoles-during-gait
#14
Tomonori Sawada, Kazuki Tokuda, Kenji Tanimoto, Yoshitaka Iwamoto, Yuta Ogata, Masaya Anan, Makoto Takahashi, Nobuhiro Kito, Koichi Shinkoda
Lateral wedge insoles (LWIs) reduce the peak external knee adduction moment (KAM). However, the efficacy of LWIs is limited in certain individuals for whom they fail to decrease KAM. Possible explanations for a lack of desired LWI response are variations in foot alignments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the immediate biomechanical effects of LWIs depend on individual foot alignments during gait. Fifteen healthy adults participated in this study. Their feet were categorized as normal, pronated, and supinated using the foot posture index...
September 2016: Gait & Posture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27468312/establishing-normative-foot-posture-index-values-for-the-paediatric-population-a-cross-sectional-study
#15
Gabriel Gijon-Nogueron, Jesus Montes-Alguacil, Pilar Alfageme-Garcia, Jose Antonio Cervera-Marin, Jose Miguel Morales-Asencio, Alfonso Martinez-Nova
BACKGROUND: The Foot Posture Index (FPI) is an observational tool designed to measure the position of the foot. Its reliability is well established, and it provides normative reference values for the general population. However, this is not so for the paediatric population. The aim of this study is to determine FPI reference values in childhood, taking into account age and gender. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 1,762 school children (863 boys and 899 girls) aged 6-11 years, from Málaga, Granada and Plasencia (Spain)...
2016: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27408486/shock-attenuation-properties-at-heel-strike-implications-for-the-clinical-management-of-the-cavus-foot
#16
Charlene Grech, Cynthia Formosa, Alfred Gatt
BACKGROUND: This study explored the relationship between foot types and corresponding variations in shock attenuating properties of the heel. METHODS: Thirty matched participants were assigned to 3 groups: pronated, neutral, and supinated. A low-mass accelerometer was mounted to the calcaneus of the right leg of each participant. RESULTS: Acceleration at heel strike for supinators was significantly higher than that in individuals with pronated and neutrally aligned feet...
September 2016: Journal of Orthopaedics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27334976/a-cross-sectional-observational-study-comparing-foot-and-ankle-characteristics-in-people-with-stroke-and-healthy-controls
#17
Dorit Kunkel, Julia Potter, Louis Mamode
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore and compare foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls; and between stroke fallers and non-fallers. METHODS: Participants were recruited from community groups and completed standardized tests assessing sensation, foot posture, foot function, ankle dorsiflexion and first metatarsal phalangeal joint range of motion (1st MPJ ROM), hallux valgus presence and severity. RESULTS: Twenty-three stroke participants (mean age 75...
June 23, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27310027/association-between-preoperative-pain-intensity-of-mtp-joint-callosities-of-the-lesser-toes-and-fore-mid-hindfoot-deformities-in-rheumatoid-arthritis-cases
#18
Makoto Hirao, Kosuke Ebina, Kenrin Shi, Tetsuya Tomita, Takaaki Noguchi, Hideki Tsuboi, Jun Hashimoto, Hideki Yoshikawa
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether preoperative pain intensity in callosities of the lesser toe metatarsopharangeal (MTP) joint was associated with the grade of fore-mid-hindfoot deformities, because rheumatoid arthritis (RA) foot deformity includes the whole part of foot, and curiously differences between cases in the pain intensity of MTP joint callosities are often observed. METHODS: We evaluated 24 feet that had undergone forefoot surgery [August, 2014 - December, 2015] for painful lesser toe MTP joint deformity (callosities) in RA cases...
January 2017: Modern Rheumatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27302428/association-between-foot-posture-index-and-ankle-sprain-in-indoor-football-players
#19
Afsaneh Safar Cherati, Masoud Dousti, Shima Younespour
OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the relationship between foot type and ankle sprain incidence. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study using the FPI, 68 adult male and female indoor football (Futsal) players were measured and their feet were classified according to foot posture index (FPI) as neutral, supinated and pronated. They were followed over 6 month as a one competition season and at the end, any injuries at the ankle during this period were detected. RESULT: There was no significant association between FPI score (considering the total FPI score and its six components) and occurrence of ankle sprain...
October 1, 2016: Global Journal of Health Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27301732/comparison-of-dorsal-and-dorsomedial-displacement-in-evaluation-of-first-ray-hypermobility-in-feet-with-and-without-hallux-valgus
#20
Dishan Singh, Carlo Biz, Marco Corradin, Laura Favero
BACKGROUND: Hypermobility of the first ray, a probable primary cause of hallux valgus, has traditionally been evaluated in the dorsal direction only although the first tarso-metatarsal joint allows movement in a dorso-medial direction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 600 feet, divided according to the presence or absence of hallux valgus, were evaluated for both dorsal and dorso-medial displacement using a Klaue device. RESULTS: In the control group, the mean first ray displacement was 7...
June 2016: Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Journal of the European Society of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
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