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"Cognitive training"

Maria Anderson, Feng Xu, Ming-Hsuan Ou-Yang, Judianne Davis, William E Van Nostrand, John K Robinson
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) depositions in both the brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature are recognized as important pathological components that contribute to the cognitive impairments found in individuals with AD. Because pharmacological options have been minimally effective in treating cognitive impairment to date, interest in the development of preventative lifestyle intervention strategies has increased in the field...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
J D Huntley, A Hampshire, D Bor, A Owen, R J Howard
BACKGROUND: Interventions that improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease are urgently required. AIMS: To assess whether a novel cognitive training paradigm based on 'chunking' improves working memory and general cognitive function, and is associated with reorganisation of functional activity in prefrontal and parietal cortices (trial registration: ISRCTN43007027). METHOD: Thirty patients with mild Alzheimer's disease were randomly allocated to receive 18 sessions of 30 min of either adaptive chunking training or an active control intervention over approximately 8 weeks...
October 6, 2016: British Journal of Psychiatry: the Journal of Mental Science
Xu Li, Zhi Li, Ke Li, Ya-Wei Zeng, Hai-Song Shi, Wen-Lan Xie, Zhuo-Ya Yang, Simon S Y Lui, Eric F C Cheung, Ada W S Leung, Raymond C K Chan
Anhedonia, the diminished ability to experience pleasure, is a challenging negative symptom in patients with schizophrenia and can be observed in at-risk individuals with schizotypy. Deficits in hedonic processing have been postulated to be related to decreased motivation to engage in potentially rewarding events. It remains unclear whether non-pharmacological interventions, such as cognitive training, could improve anhedonia. The present study aimed to examine the neural mechanism for alleviating hedonic deficits with working memory (WM) training in individuals with social anhedonia...
October 18, 2016: Scientific Reports
Joachim T Operskalski, Aron K Barbey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Pedro Shiozawa, July Silveira Gomes, Daniella Valverde Ducos, Henrique Teruo Akiba, Álvaro Machado Dias, Alisson Paulino Trevizol, Ricardo R Uchida, Natasza Orlov, Quirino Cordeiro
Introduction: We report a transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) protocol over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) combined with cognitive training in schizophrenia. Method: We assessed psychotic symptoms in nine patients using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). All evaluations were scored at baseline, at the end of the intervention protocol, and during a 4-week follow-up. The tDCS protocol consisted of 10 consecutive sessions over 5-day periods...
July 2016: Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Susan J Pressler, Jordan M Harrison, Marita Titler, Todd M Koelling, Miyeon Jung, Susan G Dorsey, Giorgos Bakoyannis, Penny L Riley, Lisa Hoyland-Domenico, Bruno Giordani
Twenty-three percent to 50% of heart failure (HF) patients have memory loss. Objectives were to (a) characterize major allelic frequency of 2 variants in apolipoprotein (APOE) gene in HF patients, (b) evaluate differences in memory and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels based on APOE ε4 allele(s), and (c) estimate effect sizes (ESs) and confidence intervals (CIs). In this pilot, 29 HF patients were enrolled and 26 completed. Recall and delayed recall memory were measured at baseline and 12 weeks...
October 12, 2016: Western Journal of Nursing Research
Kendra M Cherry-Allen, Jeff M Gidday, Jin-Moo Lee, Tamara Hershey, Catherine E Lang
The authors tested whether 2 doses of remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC), induced via blood pressure cuff inflation, enhanced motor and cognitive learning to an equal extent, and explored a panel of blood biomarkers of RLIC. Thirty-two young adults were randomized to 3 groups and underwent a 7-day protocol of RLIC/sham followed by motor and cognitive training, with follow-up. Both RLIC groups had greater motor learning and a trend toward greater cognitive learning compared with the sham group. RLIC at the lower inflation pressure was as effective as RLIC with the higher inflation pressure...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Motor Behavior
David Gil-Sanz, Mar Fernández-Modamio, Rosario Bengochea-Seco, Marta Arrieta-Rodríguez, Gabriela Pérez-Fuentes
OBJECTIVE: Social cognition is recognized to be a deficit in individuals suffering from schizophrenia. Numerous studies have explored the relationship between social cognition and social functioning in outpatients with schizophrenia through the use of different social cognition training programs. This study examines the efficacy of the Social Cognition Training Program (PECS in Spanish) in adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. METHODS: Data were derived from a sample of 44 non-hospitalized adult patients who presented with a DSM-IV-TR Axis I diagnosis of schizophrenia and 39 healthy controls...
2016: Clinical Schizophrenia & related Psychoses
Krister Håkansson, Aurélie Ledreux, Kirk Daffner, Yvonne Terjestam, Patrick Bergman, Roger Carlsson, Miia Kivipelto, Bengt Winblad, Ann-Charlotte Granholm, Abdul Kadir H Mohammed
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a central role in brain plasticity by mediating changes in cortical thickness and synaptic density in response to physical activity and environmental enrichment. Previous studies suggest that physical exercise can augment BDNF levels, both in serum and the brain, but no other study has examined how different types of activities compare with physical exercise in their ability to affect BDNF levels. By using a balanced cross over experimental design, we exposed nineteen healthy older adults to 35-minute sessions of physical exercise, cognitive training, and mindfulness practice, and compared the resulting changes in mature BDNF levels between the three activities...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Ludovico Pedullà, Giampaolo Brichetto, Andrea Tacchino, Claudio Vassallo, Paola Zaratin, Mario Alberto Battaglia, Laura Bonzano, Marco Bove
BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but the definition of the best cognitive rehabilitation tools and features is still an open issue among researchers. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effectiveness of COGNI-TRAcK (a customized application software delivering personalized working memory-based exercises) on cognitively impaired people with MS and to investigate the effects of an adaptive vs. a non-adaptive cognitive training administered by means of COGNI-TRAcK...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation
Laurence Desjardins-Crépeau, Nicolas Berryman, Sarah A Fraser, Thien Tuong Minh Vu, Marie-Jeanne Kergoat, Karen Zh Li, Laurent Bosquet, Louis Bherer
PURPOSE: Physical exercise and cognitive training have been shown to enhance cognition among older adults. However, few studies have looked at the potential synergetic effects of combining physical and cognitive training in a single study. Prior trials on combined training have led to interesting yet equivocal results. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of combined physical and cognitive interventions on physical fitness and neuropsychological performance in healthy older adults...
2016: Clinical Interventions in Aging
Daniel J Simons, Walter R Boot, Neil Charness, Susan E Gathercole, Christopher F Chabris, David Z Hambrick, Elizabeth A L Stine-Morrow
In 2014, two groups of scientists published open letters on the efficacy of brain-training interventions, or "brain games," for improving cognition. The first letter, a consensus statement from an international group of more than 70 scientists, claimed that brain games do not provide a scientifically grounded way to improve cognitive functioning or to stave off cognitive decline. Several months later, an international group of 133 scientists and practitioners countered that the literature is replete with demonstrations of the benefits of brain training for a wide variety of cognitive and everyday activities...
October 2016: Psychological Science in the Public Interest: a Journal of the American Psychological Society
Grace M McPhee, Luke A Downey, Anthony Noble, Con Stough
As the elderly population grows the impact of age associated cognitive decline as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia will increase. Ageing is associated with consistent impairments in cognitive processes (e.g., processing speed, memory, executive function and learning) important for work, well-being, life satisfaction and overall participation in society. Recently, there has been increased effort to conduct research examining methods to improve cognitive function in older citizens...
October 2016: Medical Hypotheses
Daniel Glizer, Penny A MacDonald
Cognitive deficits are prevalent among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in both early and late stages of the disease. These deficits are associated with lower quality of life, loss of independence, and institutionalization. To date, there is no effective pharmacological treatment for the range of cognitive impairments presented in PD. Cognitive training (CT) has been explored as an alternative approach to remediating cognition in PD. In this review we present a detailed summary of 13 studies of CT that have been conducted between 2000 and 2014 and a critical examination of the evidence for the effectiveness and applicability of CT in PD...
2016: Parkinson's Disease
Eun Jae Ko, In Young Sung, Eui Soo Jeong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
Blanka Klimova
Recent demographic trends indicate that older people appear to be one of the fastest growing population groups worldwide. In the year 2000, people older than 65 years represented 12.4% of the population. This number is expected to rise to 19% by 2030, particularly in developed countries. Therefore, there is sustained effort at both national and international levels to prolong the active life of these people as long as possible. Since the present older generation at the age of 55 years is already digitally literate, the use of technologies is one of the solutions...
2016: Clinical Interventions in Aging
Jennifer Bail, Karen Meneses
BACKGROUND: Advancements in chemotherapy have greatly increased breast cancer survival, leading to an increased focus on the management of long-term effects of treatment. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment, one such long-term effect, is experienced by as many as 90% of breast cancer survivors (BCS) and negatively affects employment, daily function, and quality of life. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment is a top research and clinical practice priority. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this article is to review computer-based cognitive training intervention studies tested in BCS, present implications for practice and directions for future research, and discuss neuroplasticity and cognitive reserve, the mechanisms by which computer-based cognitive training produces physiologic changes in the brain...
October 1, 2016: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Éric Ettore, Emeline Wyckaert, Renaud David, Philippe Robert, Olivier Guérin, Frédéric Prate
New technologies offer innovations to improve the care of the elderly with Alzheimer's or and other forms of dementia. Robots, endowed with features such as monitoring of physiological parameters, cognitive training or occupational therapy, have appeared. They are not, however, intended to replace humans. Still underutilized, these robots are in development, much like the digital literacy of the elderly.
September 2016: Soins. Gérontologie
Mariusz Gujski, Tomasz Juńczyk, Jaroslaw Pinkas, Alfred Owoc, Iwona Bojar
The aging of the population generates a number of very interesting research questions in the fields of medicine, psychology, sociology, demography, and many others. One of the issues subject to both intensive research by scientists and exploration by practitioners is associated with cognitive functions. The article presents current knowledge regarding practical actions in the field of promoting cognitive function using diagnostic programmes and training using modern technologies. An important aspect presented in this study is also related to the welfare of the maintenance or improvement of cognitive function...
September 2016: Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine: AAEM
Lauren Wallace, Nicholas Raison, Faisal Ghumman, Aidan Moran, Prokar Dasgupta, Kamran Ahmed
BACKGROUND: There is a need for new approaches to surgical training in order to cope with the increasing time pressures, ethical constraints, and legal limitations being placed on trainees. One of the most interesting of these new approaches is "cognitive training" or the use of psychological processes to enhance performance of skilled behaviour. Its ability to effectively improve motor skills in sport has raised the question as to whether it could also be used to improve surgical performance...
September 19, 2016: Surgeon: Journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
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