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Sonia Kapur, Anna Zajicek
How are the images of abused South Asian marriage migrants shaped by domestic violence advocates? We explore the social constructions of battered Asian Indian marriage migrants in the victim advocates' narratives. First, we find the narratives both reproduce and challenge the dominant stereotypes, utilizing some individualistic typifications while constructing these images with an understanding of the broader context of battered South Asian women's experiences. Second, depending on the issue (e.g., economic dependence or religion), the advocates paint either a multidimensional or a one-dimensional picture of their clients...
March 1, 2018: Violence Against Women
Henry Bladon
This paper looks at the relationship between fiction and psychiatry. Specifically, the idea of psychiatrists as fiction writers is explored, and reference is made to various fictional texts to illustrate the problems of stigma and negative imagery. These two main areas of focus are highlighted as ones that the practice of writing fiction might address, and some potential pitfalls are discussed. The paper suggests how psychiatrists might ameliorate the present problems by incorporating their unique clinical skills and knowledge into fictional narratives...
April 2018: BJPsych Bulletin
Angus Fayia Tengbeh, Luisa Enria, Elizabeth Smout, Thomas Mooney, Mike Callaghan, David Ishola, Bailah Leigh, Deborah Watson-Jones, Brian Greenwood, Heidi Larson, Shelley Lees
The 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic presented a challenging setting in which to carry out clinical trials. This paper reports findings from social science research carried out in Kambia, Northern Sierra Leone during first year of an Ebola vaccine trial (August 2015-July 2016). The social science team collected data through ethnographic observation, 42 in depth interviews; 4 life narratives; 200 exit interviews; 31 key informant interviews; and 8 focus group discussions with trial participants and community members not enrolled in the trial...
March 5, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Sana B Ali, Juana Romero, Kevin Morrison, Baria Hafeez, Jessica S Ancker
OBJECTIVES:  Although electronic patient portals are offered by most health care organizations, poor usability and poor fit to patient needs may pose barriers to adoption. We collaborated with an academic hospital to conduct iterative user evaluation of a newly deployed portal designed to deliver inpatient data upon hospital discharge. METHODS:  Three evaluators applied heuristic usability evaluation and conducted 23 individual user testing sessions with patients with chronic disease or managing the care of family members with chronic disease...
January 2018: Applied Clinical Informatics
Sümeyra Tosun, Nafiseh Faghihi, Jyotsna Vaid
To explore lay conceptions of characteristics of an ideal sense of humor as embodied in a known individual, our study examined elicited written narratives by male and female participants from three different countries of origin: United States, Iran, and Turkey. As reported in an earlier previous study with United States-based participants (Crawford and Gressley, 1991), our study also found that the embodiment of an ideal sense of humor was predominantly a male figure. This effect was more pronounced for male than for female participants but did not differ by country...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Thomas R Egnew
Many clinicians may feel poorly prepared to manage patient suffering resulting from the travails of chronic illness. This essay explores the thesis that chronically and terminally ill patients can be holistically healed by transcending the suffering occasioned by the degradations of their illnesses. Suffering is conveyed as a story and clinicians can encourage healing by co-constructing patients' illness stories. By addressing the inevitable existential conflicts uncovered in patients' narratives and helping them edit their stories to promote acceptance and meaning, suffering can be transcended...
March 2018: Annals of Family Medicine
Kathleen Hall Jamieson
After documenting the existence and exploring some implications of three alternative news narratives about science and its challenges, this essay outlines ways in which those who communicate science can more accurately convey its investigatory process, self-correcting norms, and remedial actions, without in the process legitimizing an unwarranted "science is broken/in crisis" narrative. The three storylines are: ( i ) quest discovery, which features scientists producing knowledge through an honorable journey; ( ii ) counterfeit quest discovery, which centers on an individual or group of scientists producing a spurious finding through a dishonorable one; and ( iii ) a systemic problem structure, which suggests that some of the practices that protect science are broken, or worse, that science is no longer self-correcting or in crisis...
March 13, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Tom Margham, Natalie Symes, Sally A Hull
BACKGROUND: Identifying patients at risk of harm in general practice is challenging for busy clinicians. In UK primary care, trigger tools and case note reviews are mainly used to identify rates of harm in sample populations. AIM: This study explores how adaptions to existing trigger tool methodology can identify patient safety events and engage clinicians in ongoing reflective work around safety. DESIGN AND SETTING: Mixed-method quantitative and narrative evaluation using thematic analysis in a single East London training practice...
March 12, 2018: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
John Noel M Viaña, Frederic Gilbert
Memory dysfunction and cognitive impairments due to Alzheimer's disease can affect the selfhood and identity of afflicted individuals, causing distress to both people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. Recently, a number of case studies and clinical trials have been conducted to determine the potential of deep brain stimulation as a therapeutic modality for people with Alzheimer's disease. Some of these studies have shown that deep brain stimulation could induce flashbacks and stabilize or even improve memory...
January 1, 2018: Dementia
Jennifer L Cerully, Joie D Acosta, Jennifer Sloan
Introduction: Many service members experiencing symptoms of mental health conditions do not receive mental health care for these symptoms. The stigma associated with having a mental health condition or seeking treatment is often cited as a specific barrier to mental health care. However, study results bearing on the question of whether and how stigma may reduce treatment-seeking have been inconsistent. Methods: We searched 10 databases for sources published between 2004 and 2014 that prospectively linked stigma to treatment-related outcomes (such as treatment seeking, retention, and reports of symptoms) using longitudinal data and predictive models...
March 8, 2018: Military Medicine
Bronwyn Louise Pearse, Claire M Rickard, Samantha Keogh, Yoke Lin Fung
BACKGROUND: Bleeding management in cardiac surgery is challenging. Many guidelines exist to support bleeding management; however, literature demonstrates wide variation in practice. In 2012, a quality initiative was undertaken at The Prince Charles Hospital, Australia to improve bleeding management for cardiac surgery patients. The implementation of the quality initiative resulted in significant reductions in the incidence of blood transfusion, re-exploration for bleeding; superficial leg and chest wound infections; length of hospital stay, and cost...
March 8, 2018: Australian Critical Care: Official Journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses
Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn
Reflecting the dangers of irresponsible science and technology, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein quickly became a mythic story that still feels fresh and relevant in the twenty-first century. The unique framework of the Frankenstein myth has permeated the public discourse about science and knowledge, creating various misconceptions around and negative expectations for scientists and for scientific enterprises more generally. Using the Frankenstein myth as an imaginative tool, we interviewed twelve scientists to explore how this science narrative shapes their views and perceptions of science...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
Phillip Baker, Sharon Friel, Adrian Kay, Fran Baum, Lyndall Strazdins, Tamara Mackean
BACKGROUND: Despite decades of evidence gathering and calls for action, few countries have systematically attenuated health inequities (HI) through action on the social determinants of health (SDH). This is at least partly because doing so presents a significant political and policy challenge. This paper explores this challenge through a review of the empirical literature, asking: what factors have enabled and constrained the inclusion of the social determinants of health inequities (SDHI) in government policy agendas? METHODS: A narrative review method was adopted involving three steps: first, drawing upon political science theories on agenda-setting, an integrated theoretical framework was developed to guide the review; second, a systematic search of scholarly databases for relevant literature; and third, qualitative analysis of the data and thematic synthesis of the results...
November 11, 2017: International Journal of Health Policy and Management
Lauren M Dinour, Jacalyn Szaro, Renata Blumberg, Mousumi Bose
OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of a community-engaged assignment on graduate student learning in the nutritional sciences. DESIGN: Convergent mixed-methods design with parallel data collection and terminal merging of data. Data were composed of grant proposals, reflection papers, and informal course evaluations from 2 semesters of the same course. Fall students wrote proposals on behalf of a community partner whereas spring students wrote fictitious grants to improve nutrition on their campus...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Heather A Feldner, Samuel W Logan, James C Galloway
AIM: Rehabilitation professionals are increasingly recognizing mobility as a basic human right and endorsing the efficacy of early powered mobility for children with mobility impairments to foster independence, promote socialization with peers and facilitate participation in family and community life. However, the relationship between mobility and technology provision, when considered in the context of lived experiences of children with mobility impairments and their families, is complex and understudied...
March 9, 2018: Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology
Constance Ann Thomas
Incivility is of great concern in nursing, yet little is known about nursing students' encounters with incivility during clinical education. The lived experience of nursing students who encountered uncivil acts (n = 12) was explored through narrative interviews. Themes describing incivility emerged, including covert criticism and open shaming. Students experienced emotional and physical turmoil, and mixed messages that created a paradox. Further research is needed to understand components of incivility and the negative remnants left by uncivil encounters on nursing students...
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Oddgeir Synnes, Kirsti Malterud
AIMS: This study aims to explore how minority stress related to sexual orientation is reflected in narratives from lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals in Norway, with an impact for national public health policy. METHODS: Arthur Frank's dialogical narrative analysis was applied to personal stories from 65 persons self-referring to different categories of queer identities, submitted online anonymously to a Norwegian national archive for queer history. A purposive sample of three different stories were selected due to their capacity to illuminate how various aspects of minority stress are narrated in diverse interplays between individual voices and resources, and cultural scripts and societal influences...
March 1, 2018: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Ying Hao, Lisa M Bedore, Li Sheng, Elizabeth D Peña
PURPOSE: Narrative skills between Mandarin and English in Mandarin-English (ME) bilingual children were compared, exploring cross-linguistic interactions of these skills, and influences of age and current language experience (input and output) on narrative performance. METHOD: Macrostructure and microstructure in elicited narratives from 21 ME bilingual children were analysed. Language experience was collected by parent report and entered as a covariate. Repeated measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to compare the two languages...
March 8, 2018: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
Wendy M Pearce, Kieran Flanagan
PURPOSE: Concern exists about the cross-cultural appropriateness of existing language assessments for non-mainstream populations, including Indigenous children who may speak a non-standard dialect of the mainstream language. This study therefore aims to investigate the language skills of Indigenous Australian children in comparison with non-Indigenous children, with a view to exploring the cultural appropriateness of language sampling assessment methods. METHOD: The performance of 51 typically developing Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian children was compared on a standardised assessment and a spoken narrative protocol using language sample analysis measures...
March 8, 2018: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
Larry Charleston, Jeffrey Royce, Teshamae S Monteith, Susan W Broner, Hope L O'Brien, Salvador L Manrriquez, Matthew S Robbins
OBJECTIVE: To review the scope of the problem facing individuals with migraine who are under- or uninsured. In this first of a 2-part narrative review, we will explore migraine epidemiology and the challenges that face this vulnerable population. BACKGROUND: Implementation of the Affordable Care Act has improved access to health care for many individuals who were previously uninsured, but there are many, particularly those of certain demographics, who are at high risk for worse outcomes...
March 8, 2018: Headache
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